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A CONSOLIDATION OF EXMIBITORS MCRAiD-WORiD AND NOTION PICTURE NiWI 












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Roxy Opens ^aA.io City Music 





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OFFIC£.««BECf)USE THE SCREEN TELLS 
THE FIRST TIME THE ROMANCE DEAR 




TO EUERY WOMAN 



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SYLVIA SIDNEY 

(ARY GRANT- CHARUE RUOOLEi 

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PRODUCTION 



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MAKION GERINO 

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—heg pardon we mean 

(next page tells you) 



Sure it^s the same 
as 1928 because 

Good times 
are here again 
thanks to the 
Laughing Lion! 




^^M-G-M Issue. Every few pages you'll find M-G-M things 
to gladden your heart. Watch carefully! M-G-IVI's 
Happy New Year Party continues on Page 29 

....J 



Make it a 
good one 
with FOX 
PICTURES 



^ -3 193: 



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©CIB 175906 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 





/ 

Vol. im.' No. 1 




December 31, 1932 



LET'S GET COMMERCIAL 

ONE of the sensational aspects of this issue of Motion 
Picture Herald is in its careful avoidance of resumes 
of the bad news of 1932 and its even more careful 
avoidance of forecasts for 1933 from the authorities who 
suffered the aforesaid 1932. 

But editors will be editors and there must be a New Year's 
message. It is our serious, dignified, solemn plea to this in- 
dustry to please get commercial, to engage in the production 
of motion pictures with a single idea of making money — money 
for the maker, money for the distributor and money for the 
exhibitor. This will require also entertainment for consumers. 

Just to avoid, in this happy holiday season, naming names 
and hurting the feelings of a number of friends and producers, 
let it be remarked as a generality that the only really good 
motion pictures of 1932 have been too infernally smart. 

In spite of every possible excuse and some that were 
impossible, the writer of this page has seen many motion pic- 
tures in the year just agone or agoing. All those that were 
good were too good, too intelligent, too demanding of 
thought, or else far too expensive. Most of them were made 
by brilliant young men engaged in making names and making 
fame, for themselves or their friends. Several of them were 
elaborately made from plays and novels that were written 
for tiny minority audiences. Now no matter how you may 
distort and "dumb-up" a castle it is never a bungalow. 

The motion picture and its production community smarted 
a long time over the taunts of writers who called it lowbrow. 
To prove its intelligence it has gone to such spokesmen of 
the masses as Lewis, Dreiser, Hemingway and their ilk. 

It is now admitted that when Hollywood reads, it reads the 
best of them. But that's been proved. Now let's let it stand. 

Along about 1898 a Klondike millionaire with his pockets 
heavy with dust and nuggets came to New York. He heard 
ihat Martin's In Fifth Avenue was "the best place to eat, 
but expensive." He rolled into the restaurant one evening 
and took a table looking into Madison Square. He tossed 
aside the meaningless menu and roared at the waiter: "Bring 
me fifty dollars worth of ham and eggs." 

And that Is supposed to be a suggestion to the vendors 
of caviar. 

AAA 
ELECTRIFYING THE DOLLAR 

WE laughed all the way from Cos Cob to Mamaroneck 
a-commuting to the job yesterday at reflections on 
the solemn suggestion of the scientists In convention 
assembled with the Econometric Society at Atlantic City that 
the nation's currency be established on the new basis of the 
average cost of the kilowatt hour of energy production. 



You may consider this absurd as something to worry about, 
but let It be observed in passing that several years ago, when 
this industry had a dollar, the scientists, many of them the 
same persons, conspired to endow our art with sound. 

If, as they seriously propose, a bond assured promise of 
the future production of forty kilowatt hours of juice by an 
electrical company Is to be taken as the foundation of a 
dollar, how much currency ought to be issued on a guaranty 
from Mr. Charles Chaplin that he will knock 'em out of their 
seats with seven reels In 1935? As far as we can see, which 
is too far for comfort, there is more sense in a celluloid dollar 
issued against entertainment hours than the current project 
which draws columns of page one area In newspapers that 
ought to know better. Further, these scientific gentlemen 
have the presumption to propose calling It the "Edison Dol- 
lar". That Is taking extraordinary advantage of Mr. Edison, 
the father of all the kilowatts. Were he alive to comment, 
his remarks would be more aromatic than encouraging. 

The proponents of the Edison Dollar, who ask for the 
national average cost of generating 40 kilowatt hours as the 
basis of the American dollar, have done well by their press 
agents, but the commercial departments of the great elec- 
trical Interests are likely to apply big feet to tender posteriors 
when the retail rate issue comes up. Just between Cos Cob 
and Mamaroneck, as we crossed the state line between 
Connecticut and New York, the reflection arose that although 
40 kilowatt hours are generated for a dollar, one kilowatt hour 
costs about 3 cents to the retail consumer in Connecticut 
and over the line In New York from 7 to I2I/2 cents. 

Perhaps the motion picture Industry as a large consumer 
might well raise some questions about this matter of kilowatt 
hours and dollars. 

AAA 



THE BOURBON TOUCH 

MERIT just will prevail. Our own and handsome 
Mr. Charles E. ("Chick") Lewis, exhibitor, publicist 
and editor of the Round Table section, has just 
received his official commission as a Colonel of the military 
staff of the Governor of the sovereign State of Kentucky. 
The staff of Motion Picture Herald has long Included several 
A.B.'s, at least one electrical engineer with lots of B.S. from 
several universities, the same being an ex-bartender, too; one 
ex-locomotive engineer, two ex-press agents, and a brace of 
ex-film executives. What we really needed was a Kentucky 
Colonel. "Colonel Lewis" sounds pleasing. The only other 
Colonel Lewis we ever knew is from Illinois, Colonel J. Ham 
Lewis, and he has pink whiskers. Our new Colonel hasn't any. 
1933 looks like a great little year, from here. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD MARTIN QUIGLEY, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 

Incorporating Exhibitor's Herald, founded 1915; Motion Picture News, founded 1913; Moving Picture World, founded 1907; Motography, founded 1909; The Film 
Index founded 1906. Published every Thursday by Quigley Publishing Connpany, 1790 Broadway, New York City. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Martin Quigley, Editor-in-Chief 
and Publisher- Colvin Brown, Vice-President and General Manager; Terry Ramsaye, Editor; Ernest A. Rovelstad. Managing Editor; Chicago office, 407 South Dearborn 
street Edwin 'S. Clifford, manager; Hollywood office. Pacific States Life Building, Leo Meehan, manager; London office, 4! Redhill Drive, Edgware, London, England, 
W H. Mooring, representative; Berlin office, Katharinstrasse 3, Berlin-Halinsee. Germany. Hans Tintner, representative; Paris office, I Rue Gabrielle, Pans 18°, France, 
Paul Gordeaux 'representative- Sydney office, 102 Sussex street, Sydney, Australia, Cliff Holt, representative; Mexico City office, James Lockhart, Apartado 269, Mexico 
City Mexico 'Member Audit Bureau cf Circulations. All contents copyright 1932 by Quigley Publishing Company. All editorial and business correspondence should 
be addressed to the New York Office Better Theatres, devoted to the construction, equipment and operation of theatres, is published 2very fourth week as section 2 
of Motion Picture Herald Other Quigley Publications: Motion Picture Daily, The Hollywood Herald, The Motion Picture Almanac, published annually, and The Chicagoan 



Four Men Who Dared 

Those who conceived and brought to fruition the ambitious enterprise that is now Radio City 






JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER, JR. 



M. H. AYLESWORTH 



DAVID SARNOFF 



Active head of one of the world's 
mightiest oil domains as successor to 
the original "John D." He carries on 
where the father left off, his interests 
powerful in commerce, vaster still and 
more enduring in philanthropy. Chair- 
man of board. Rockefeller Foundation 
(scientific research); trustee. Rockefeller 
Institute for Medical Research; asso- 
ciated with Bureau of Social Hygiene, 
International Health Board, China Medi- 
cal Board. Means more to the Univer- 
sity, Alpha Delta Phi, Brown University, 
City Midday, Recess, Bankers, Sleepy 
Hollow Country and other clubs than 
they mean to him. 



Proceeding from law to public utilities 
to radio entertainment, he added thea- 
tres to his interests by becoming presi- 
dent of Radio-Keith-Orpheum, while 
still remaining head of the National 
Broadcasting Company, which he be- 
came when the development of shows 
by wireless prompted the founding of 
that corporation. Has sought education 
assiduously, schools he has attended 
including the University of Denver, Col- 
orado Agricultural College, University 
of Denver, University of Wisconsin and 
Columbia. Practiced law in Fort Col- 
lins, Colo., but quit professional life to 
run corporations. 



President and director of the Radio Cor- 
poration of America and chairman of 
the board of Radio-Keith-Orpheum. Yet 
he is only 41. A boy of nine when his 
parents brought him from Uzlian, Minsk, 
Russia, and not much older when he 
stuck 72 hours to his post taking wire- 
less reports of the sinking Titanic. He 
was a junior Marconi operator then, but 
his heroism brought quick promotion, 
making him commercial manager of the 
Marconi company. Absorption of Mar- 
coni by the new Radio Corporation of 
America brought him into the company 
he now heads. He has never worked 
outside the communications field. 





Rothafel is a name almost obliterated 
by "Roxy," which now joins Bailey, 
Barnum, Ringling, Frohman, Belasco and 
others on the roster of American show- 
men, and which will ultimately become 
quasi-legendary. The Roxy medium is 
according to his own day. Although it 
branches out, its origins and associa- 
tions belong to the motion picture. 
Coming from the Middle West to New 
York when a lad, he worked at many 
things, but finally found himself running 
a picture theatre in Pennsylvania. Re- 
turning to the Middle West, he began 
to add singers and orchestras to his 
screen program, and the rest was merely 
a matter of how far they'd let him go. 



SAMUEL LIONEL ROTHAFEL 



[8] 



December 3 1, I 932 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



9 



INDUSTRY STARTS ARBITRATION 
DISTRIBUTORS ADOPT APPEALS B 




Official Announcement Await- 
ed fronn Distributors Indicat- 
ing Adoption of S. R. Kent's 
Program for Correcting Ills 

The Sidney R. Kent program for correct- 
ing trade pjractices will soon be an in- 
tegral, part of film distribution machinery. 
The national appeals board for adjusting 
major differences and an optional form of 
exhibition contract which contains a clause 
permitting voluntary arbitration of local dis- 
putes are expected to become operative be- 
tween February 1 and February IS. The 
sponsors believe that both will pave the way 
for better relations between buyer and seller 
of motion pictures. 

Distributor signatories of the pact will, 
within a few days, make official announce- 
ment, individually, of their acceptance of 
the board of appeals. Final adoption of the 
board by several companies followed a series 
of conferences between the respective legal 
and sales departments and a committee of 
theatre owners. The contract and arbitra- 
tion planks of Mr. Kent's plan were accepted 
previously. 

Meanwhile, Allied States Association ap- 
pears to be intent on proceeding with a cam- 
paign for federal legislation. Word was 
dispatched from national headquarters to the 
membership at large requesting contribu- 
tions of $25 each to finance lobbying activi- 
ties in connection with the crusade. There 
are no current indications that Allied will 
swing to the industry program. Leaders of 
the association said last month that they 
would proceed with a legislative policy un- 
less and until the distributors agreed to the 
Kent proposals. They insisted at that time 
that all distributor-circuits participate. 

Allied's national directorate will assemble 
at headquarters in Washington on January 
5th to discuss progress of the campaign. 
Each member is supposed to have in hand 
a list of federal legislators who have been 
approached on the matter either in person 
or by letter. 

On the other hand, members of the 
MPTOA are prepared to use the contract 
and the arbitration system. M. A. Light- 
man, president, sent word from Memphis 
Tuesday that his organization "is meeting 
with huge success in getting wires of rati- 
fication from the directors of our state 
affiliates." 

Six Distributors To Use Contract 

Fox, Universal, Paramount, Metro, Edu- 
cational-World Wide and RKO are defi- 
nitely committed to the program. Universal 
is understood to be the only company which 
has not completed negotiations on the ap- 
peals board. Willard McKay, counsel for 
the corporation said Tuesday that there re- 
mained only a few details to be clarified. 
This was to be done, he said, in a few days. 

"Every single objection raised by the dis- 
tributors to the appeals board has finally 
been overcome," according to a spokesman 
for the negotiating committee. He said this 
week that the objections were based prin- 
cipally on the unfamiliarity of distributors 



with the modus operandi of the pact and 
that the purposes have not been changed. 

The legal directors of the various dis- 
tributors are understood to be preparing the 
text of the appeals board agreement, and the 
official announcement of acceptance. 

Columbia Pictures and United Artists are 
still reconsidering their original rejections 
of the pact. In both cases the company's 
legal advisors are against adoption, while 
the sales departments favor it. Present in- 
dications are that the sales executives will 
win out. Warner Brothers has not been 
committed either way. 

The local arbitration system, according to 
a distributor spokesman, is intended to cre- 
ate a form of "home rule" in the territories 
as the basic means of abolishing the many 
deep-rooted disputes which have prevailed 
over a long period between the independent 
owners, exchanges and affiliated theatres. 
These disputes involve protection, zoning, 
admissions, double features and the like. 

There are no specific meeting places men- 
tioned for the arbitration boards, but it is 
expected that many will probably collect 
periodically in the key city offices of the 
Film Boards of Trade. This is not compul- 
sory, the agreement merely insisting that all 
sessions be held in the distribution centers 
in which the principals operate. 

"It is now up to the people in each terri- 
tory to adjust their own situation," said the 
distributor representative. "They will be 



OQ3 



This IVeek 

Industry starts arbitration on February 
15; distributors adopt board of ap- 
peals Page 9 

Opening of two theatres inaugurates 
operation of Radio City as an amuse- 
ment center Page 10 

Anti-double feature policy reversed as 
many exhibitors disregard ban on dual 
bills Page 12 

Twenty-six books and plays bought by 

producers during November Page 18 

Censorship — A Box Office Factor Page 19 

Ufa and Tobis uphold Germany's film 



business in time of trial 



FEATURES 



Edito rial 

The Camera Reports 
Asides and Interludes 
J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 
Meetings 



DEPARTMENTS 



Box Office Receipts 
Showmen's Reviews 
Chicago 

Managers Round Table 
Short Features 
Technological 
The Release Chart 
What the Picture Did for 
Stage Attractions 
Classified Advertising 



Me 



Page 20 



Page 7 

Page 21 
Page 27 
Page 48 
Page 34 



Page 42 
Page 36 
Page 80 
Page 58 
Page 80 
Page 83 
Page 84 
Page 50 
Page 



Page 90 



MPTO State Affiliates Are Now 
Ratifying Proposals; Allied 
Continues with Plans for Fed- 
eral Legislative Campaign 

permitted to do this as they see fit. They 
have the means and they will be left alone 
to proceed along their own desires." 

Board in Effect Three Years 

The arbitration clause and optional ex- 
hibition contract were accepted several 
weeks ago for three years, but distributors 
refused at that time to agree to a similar 
period on the national appeals board. They 
insisted that it should first be tried for one 
year, at the end of which changes in opera- 
tion could be inade if deemed necessary. 
However, an indefinite period of experimen- 
tation has now been decided upon, although 
the life of the pact will continue for three 
years. Periodically, the interested parties 
will review the work of the board for pur- 
poses of correction. 

Fundamental principles of the appelate 
body have been established, but actual de- 
tails of procedure will be left for the board 
to work out. Inasmuch as the board will 
take its cases from the local arbitration 
units, whenever the arbitration boards are 
unable to agree, there is little likelihood that 
the appeals council will have any cases be- 
fore it for three or four months. 

The board of appeals will be composed of 
exhibitors and sales managers of companies 
participating in the pact. For the ordinary 
run of cases there will be three representa- 
tives of disinterested distributors and three 
independent exhibitors. On so-called "extra- 
ordinary" cases, or on those cases where 
an affiliated circuit is involved, the board 
will be composed of four independent ex- 
hibitors, two distributor and two circuit rep- 
resentatives. 

At all times the plaintifif and the defense 
will each have the right to challenge one 
member of the distributor delegation or one 
of the exhibitor representation. When this 
occurs a member is automatically eliminated 
from the opposite side, thereby reducing the 
board from a 3-3 ratio in ordinary cases, to 
2-2. In controversies of the extraordinary 
type, a challenge will reduce the board to 
three independent exhibitors, two distribu- 
tors and one circuit representative. 

Methods of Selecting Mennbers 

The theatre owners have not yet decided 
upon a method of selecting delegates. The 
national associates are expected to designate 
a panel, including alternates. The original 
draft of the plan, as drawn by Mr. Kent and 
a joint Aliied-MPTOA committee, provided 
that, "In case the dispute arises in what is 
known as Allied territory, the representa- 
tives of the independent exhibitors shall be 
designated by Allied States Association, and 
in cases where the dispute arises in what is 
known as MPTOA terirtory, the representa- 
tives of the independent exhibitors shall be 
designated by the MPTOA." 

When the dispute arises in so-called "neu- 

(Continned on page 26) 



10 



MOTION PICTU RE HERALD 



December 3 1, I 932 



RADIO CITY BEGINS CAREER: 



Gorgeous 
R oxy's 

By TERRY RAMSAmrii!: ^ 

As this week closes' Mr. Samuel L 
Rothafel again dashes forward on his ca- 
reer in a feat of Roman riding such as 
the world of amusement has never 
dreamed. With two pairs of reins in hand 
he rides with one foot on the Radio City 
Music Hall, devoted to vaudeville and 
spectacle, and under the other the RKO 
Roxy motion picture theatre, devoted to 
the art that destroyed vaudeville and su- 
persedes the old forms of drama and 
spectacle. 

Radio City Music Hall, architecturally 
the world's greatest and finest theatre, was 
opened Tuesday night with 6,200 mem- 
bers of who's who in New York out front 
and only slightly fewer members of who's 
which on stage and back. The theatre is 
so big that it took approximately 10,000 
persons from 8 o'clock until forty-five min- 
utes after midnight to get it open to Roxy's 
satisfaction. It may now be said to be 
open. 

The chief significance of the Radio City 
Music Hall, at this stage, Is as a blazing 
landmark of endeavor and attainment in 
endowing the theatre and its arts with 
beauty, grandeur and the utmost in the 
mechanisms and facilities which science has 
made available. Rockefeller money. Radio 
daring and Roxy concepts have set before 
America and the world an achievement In 
theatre construction which shall be his- 
tory. In that the cause of the amusement 
industry is served, magnificently served. 

The frame is glorious beyond compari- 
son. The picture in that frame — as painted 
under the skyhigh proscenium Tuesday 
night — ^we shall be coming to that im- 
mediately. 

The show in Its nineteen interminable 
numbers can only be understood in terms 
of the showman, his amazing assurance, his 
equally amazing Internal doubtings, his 
vaulting ambition, his dreams, his sympathy 
and his emotionalism. On a stage 80 by 
144 feet in area, In four hours of program, 
he revealed It all. 

Really Began in 1914 

Roxy's big night had been on the way 
since that night of April II, 1914 when he 
opened the Strand on Broadway and stood 
the audience up with a shot from Pathe 
News and "The Star Spangled Banner." 
He did it again Tuesday night, without 
the film. 

In his Radio City show Roxy took the 
big beating heart of Babbitt America to 
his own and said it all, in a big, big way. 
Including, so help me, "Dixie" and "Old 



Theatrics Mark 
Radio City Debut 



Black Joe." He opened with a "Sym- 
phony of the Curtains," demonstrating and 
emphasizing the machinery of control 
which so fills him with delight. The cur- 
tain did tricks, great awesome tricks, while 
two organists on two great organs piped 
and pealed from their surprising niches in 
the vast arch cliffs. Big, big, big, the 
organs screamed, shouted, purred. 

On came an ode of "Dedication" pro- 
claimed by Mr. Robert T. Haines, made up 
In a big, big way as a Being, as old as 
Time and twice as authoritative. It was 
as close as Roxy could come to having 
his stage dedicated In person by the Al- 
mighty Himself. Then, as though in fear 
of the majesty of the idea, It was counter- 
balanced by a reciting clown in rouge and 
white with a narrative paean about the 
building of Radio City damnably illus- 
trated and symbolized by a burst from 
steam jets rising in the play of such lights 
as never were seen this side of the Pearly 
Gates of Thence. 

There was Roxy's obeisance to the high 
Art of choreography with Mr. Harald 
Kreutzberg in the role of the "Angel of 
Fate" supported by sundry other dancers, 
abstractly, oh so abstractly, depicting fun 
in „ ^raveyard, lighted the while with a 
ghoulish arsenical green with the flavor of 



grass grown on the fringes of some decom- 
posing hell. But not until into the morning 
did Art really hit its stride, when at Num- 
ber 18, Martha Graham "and her dance 
group" broke loose and arted all over the 
stage in a "choric dance for an antique 
Greek tragedy" for a very long time. 

A Show for the People 

But Roxy took no chances with a curse 
of highbrowlsm. He had an antidote for 
that sufficient to cancel any charges from 
the upper end of the scale, when at Num- 
ber I 7, Doctor Rockwell, vaudeville mono- 
logist, equipped with scissors, bit by bit, 
cut away the skirt of a warbling diva and 
reached a delicate climax by taking a 
neat sample 2I/4 by 3% Inches in area, as 
we estimated It from the eighteenth row, 
from her short lace panties. Set in sev- 
eral million dollars worth of handmade 
heaven this act had all the fitness and 
charm of a dachshund pup having his way 
against the Empire State Building. 

There was a day before the coming of 
the glory of now that Roxy looked with 
hungering eyes on the glamours of the 
Metropolitan and the exalted fame of 
Gatti-Casazza, Bodansky and the like, bor- 
rowing some of the aromas of operatic 
sanctity for the Rialto and Rivoli in the 
services of sundry ballet masters, set de- 
signers and the like. But now. In the great 
glorious now, opera Is but an ante in the 
potpourri of the Music Hall. There's Frau- 
lein Vera Schwarz from the Staats-Oper, 
Berlin, singing a lot of "Liebeswalzer" and 



THE QUESTION THAT FACES 



5 Much was expected of Radio 
City Music Hall. Backed by the 
ample financial resources of the 
Rockefeller interests and inspired 
and guided by S. L. Rothafel, this 
elaborate venture in the amuse- 
ment business was depended upon 
to establish new and greater stand- 
ards. It was expected to typify 
the progress made in the building 
of better theatres. 

5 Radio City Music Hall does all 
of this. It is an extraordinary 
achievement in size, in beauty, in 
appointments and in equipment. 
Roxy's astute judgment, based on 
a long and thorough experience 
in buildings of popular amuse- 
ment, gives a character and an 
advance to this new and extra- 
ordinary hall of entertainment. 



5 The real news relative to the 
new development is not, however, 
concerned with the building or 
with the environment created 
therein. There was no question 
of the outstanding excellence of 
these, before the inaugural eve- 
ning and there can be none now. 
But there was question as to what 
was to be disclosed upon the stage 
and the opening performance 
leaves that question unanswered, 
or at least not satisfactorily an- 
swered. 

5 The opening program, in vari- 
ous of its units, rattled about 
piteously in the great and beauti- 
ful hall. Other units which were 
of dimensions corresponding to 
the vastness of the hall were 
bland, neutral and quite unim- 



December 31, 1932 



« 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



MUSIC HALL, ROXY OPEN 



there's none other than the great Titta 
Ruffo himself in excellent voice, together 
with some four excerpt acts from "Car- 
men." And what "Carmen"! Bizet at his 
busiest never dreamed such extended 
magnificence as Roxy's "Carmen" painted 
verily on a seven league canvas with 
brushes of comet's hair. As a series of 
stage pictures Roxy's "Carmen" is gor- 
geous, every now and then. Four acts of 
it, however, more than suffice, in the 
same sense that a man thirsty for a glass 
of water gets embarrassed at Lake Michi- 
gan. It's bigger, bigger, bigger. 

Pleasant, sincere words should be set 
down for the vast orchestra so competently 
conducted by Erno Rapee, 

But mainly bigness counted. Everything 
big that Roxy ever heard of, except may- 
be Niagara Falls and Kate Smith. He may 
get them yet, too. 

It was 12:45 o'clock in the morning 
and great patches were opening up among 
the ermine drifts of the expanses of audi- 
torium as the audience melted and 
trickled, when Roxy answered a call to 
the stage, thanked his staff and hit his 
time honored radio chord: "Good night — 
and God bless you." 

What Roxy does, what he will have done, 
with the Radio City motion picture the- 
atre, the RKO Roxy, as this issue of Mo- 
tion Picture Herald reaches you, will may- 
hap be another story of showmanship — 
motion picture showmanship, which for 
America's millions Is after all the only 
showmanship that matters. 



Theatres Are Designed and 
Equipped on Elaborate Scale 



By GEORGE SCHUTZ 

The two theatres of Radio City, open- 
ing as the first full-functioning units of 
the Radio Corporation's division of Rocke- 
feller Center in New York, were revealed 
this week with all the glamor promised 
by the many months of publicity given 
them. They prove to be extraordinary 
theatres, one In sheer immensity, both In 
the elegance of their architecture and 
programs. 

With a program that was ultimately 
cut down to more than four hours in 
length and exhaustively prepared by 
many geniuses of the theatre laboring 
under the supervision of Roxy (S. L. 
Rothafel), the most gorgeous of these 
theatres. Radio City Music Hall, dis- 
closed to more than 6,000 people the 
type of entertainment to be presented 
there. The inaugural performance con- 
sisted in what some may call "glorified 
vaudeville," but Its elements finally 
wrought out something more than that. 
The Music Hall show most resembles a 
revue, but it is offered in more serious 
vein, with emphasis on the semi-classical 
and spectacular. Few theatres — if. In- 
deed, any — could quite accommodate 
its vast ensembles and prodigious theatri- 
cal effects, but for these very things the 



MR. ROTHAFEL By Martin Quigley 



pressive. One or two items, 
notably the choir from the Tusk- 
egee Institute, were impressive and 
seemed logically a part of what 
was to be expected in an enter- 
prise of such pretentions. But the 
show generally was Roxy's old 
show frmn the original Koxy 
theatre — without the picture. 
And it is, of course, a matter of 
common knowledge in the trade 
that attendance at the old theatre 
fluctuated erratically, the determ- 
ining factor being the varying 
appeal of the motion picture and 
in no way the stage show which 
it was possible largely to stand- 
ardize as to quality and appeal. 

5 The problem as to attractions 
therefore remains as something to 
engage Roxy's manifold abilities 



during the succeeding months. 
If he is left principally reliant 
upon vaudeville, especially in its 
present decadent state, Roxy and 
his associates are likely to learn an 
expensive lesson on the point of 
the relative importance of a the- 
atre building as compared with a 
theatre attraction. The whole 
history of the show business points 
to the dominance of the attrac- 
tion, the hall, however adequate 
or inadequate it may happen to 
he, being of decidedly secondary 
importance. 

5 The situation then is that Roxy 
is now all dressed up with the 
greatest and finest in the history 
of the theatre; the question is will 
he be able to find somewhere to 
go with it. 



Music Hall has been specifically designed. 

The stage, without being disproportion- 
ate, has a height at the proscenium open- 
ing of 60 feet. Several large ballet units, 
a couple of choruses, a galaxy of princi- 
pals, sets, props, cyclorama and four 
horses failed to fill it Tuesday night. And 
perhaps as many as 200 performers were 
raised out of depths beneath It by the 
might of its lift equipment. Stage light- 
ing, emanating from the auditorium pro- 
jection room, from between the contour 
curtain and the proscenium arch and from 
the rigging loft, and produced under elec- 
tronic control, probably challenged the 
ingenuity of even Leon Leonidoff and 
Robert Edmond Jones. The proscenium 
drop — the contour curtain — furls up- 
ward at almost any point along its vast 
breadth, dividing the stage, if desired, 
Into one or more smaller stages. The 
technics of this stage are alone capable 
of providing quite a performance in 
themselves. 

From the proscenium arch the audi- 
torium bells out In lengthening arches, 
stepped for both architectural and acous- 
tical reasons all the way back to three 
mezzanines deep in the rear. Pierced plas- 
ter bands form a strip pattern horizontally 
across the series of arches. They are illu- 
minated from the rear, while the forward 
ones serve also as organ loft grilles. In 
this theatre there are two organs. 

Mezzanines Displace Balconies 

The Music Hall mezzanines have been 
designed on the same principle applied 
in the other Radio City theatre, the 
RKO Roxy. It has been desired to elim- 
inate any overhanging balconies In order, 
it is said, to create a feeling of intimacy 
in the audience and to preclude the pos- 
sibility of bad acoustical areas. The mez- 
zanines are not only relatively shallow, but 
recede Into an upper area to the rear of 
the main level. 

The RKO Roxy, opening Thursday night 
as the motion picture theatre of Radio 
City, shows the application of similar prin- 
ciples in its auditorium. Just as the audi- 
torium of the Music Hall does not flatten 
out to form a front wall opening In a 
proscenium arch, that of the Roxy ends 
with similar abruptness. Here, however, 
the stage opening is rectangular, with 
the walls slightly converging to flank It, 
and the front curtain following in a con- 
cave contour the curve of the ceiling. 
And, as we have seen, there are no bal- 
conies, but merely three shallow mezza- 
nines. 

The Roxy auditorium has walls entirely 

(.Continued on page 26) 



12 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 



ANTI-DUAL MOVEMENT REVERSED AS 
MANY DISREGARD BAN ON DOUBLES 



Many Exhibitors Returning to 
Double Feature Policy Under 
Pressure of Weak Business; 
Elimination Pacts Discarded 

The recently prevalent tendency pointing 
toward elimination of double feature show- 
ings at motion picture theatres has suddenly 
reversed, according to reports from various 
cities which indicate that many exhibitors, 
prompted by conditions, and, in many cases, 
by similar action of competitors, are swing- 
ing back to the old dual policy. Local bans 
are being disregarded in many territories. 
Kansas City, Detroit, Milwaukee, Racine, 
Boston, Memphis and St. Louis are among 
the cities where exhibitors are returning to 
double bills in order to bolster box office 
returns. 

Only Chicago seems to be holding to an 
agreement committing owners to singles. 

In Detroit, where Allied States Associa- 
tion has fought for three monthe to enforce 
the ban on dual features, the lid blew off a 
few days ago when seven prominent neigh- 
borhood houses returned to doubles. Sev- 
eral of the smaller houses had violated the 
agreement to ban duals almost from its in- 
ception. H. M. Richey, business manager of 
Allied in Michigan, admitted that the desire 
of a majority of exhibitors was for double 
features but reaffirmed the statement that 
the position of his association has been and 
always will be that double bills are unwise. 
"Consequently," Mr. Richey said, "the asso- 
ciation is looking out of the window as far 
as the matter is concerned at present." 

Only a short time ago, Racine revoked its 
cooperative agreement calling for single 
features. The change was largely due to the 
fact that Tom Norman brought back duals 
to the Uptown theatre. Now the Crown and 
Capitol are again showing doubles. 

Double featuring difficulty hit Memphis 
this week. Loew's, Warner and RKO are 
participating. 

Similarly the situation in downtown Mil- 
waukee, which has been comparatively free 
from double bills, has changed. The War- 
ner theatre has adopted a policy of doubles 
and two other theatres have given double 
features a trial. 

In St. Louis, the Film Board of Trade has 
notified Radio-Keith-Orpheum that it is 
opposed to the double bill policy in force 
at the Missouri theatre. RKO, replying that 
the policy has been in force three years, 
ever since it was started by the Skouras 
brothers, informed the board that if it wants 
to operate the house the circuit will be glad 
to turn it over. Meanwhile, Publix has con- 
tinued to show double features. 

At a recent meeting in Baltimore of the 
Motion Picture Theatre Owners of Mary- 
land, it was decided that each theatre owner 
will have to settle the questions of admis- 
sions and double features for himself. Her- 
man A. Blum, president, informed members 
that the organization would be glad to help 
straighten out any problem involving com- 
petitive theatres. 

Under the new local decentralized man- 
agement of Publix theatres in New England, 
three Boston first run house?, are changing 
from a single feature to a double feature 



policy. The important Fenway, Paramount 
and Uptown are all going to doubles and 
the Beacon theatre will continue as a second 
run double feature house. The Modern, 
which has been playing double features 
under a second run policy, is reported re- 
turning to singles. 

In addresses delivered last week in Mil- 
waukee before the Better Films Council and 
the MPTO of Wisconsin and Upper Mich- 
igan, Carl E. Milliken, secretary of the 
MPPDA, deplored the "double feature 
nuisance." 

Chicago theatres, according to Carl Les- 
serman, of Warners, are keeping their anti- 
double feature agreement with but a few 
unimportant exceptions. This city practiced 
the system for years, to a greater extent 
than elsewhere, until a sudden agreement 
was effected by all local owners several 
weeks ago. 

Kansas City is another spot where double 
billing regulations self-imposed by exhibitors 
have fallen by the wayside through lack of 
observance by those who adopted them as a 
"constructive measure." 

A "Code of Ethics" limiting twin bills 
to one a week and none on Sunday is being 
tacitly ignored by neighborhood houses. 
They embraced the pact several months ago 
but soon thereafter double billing cropped 
up again and the Independent Theatre Own- 
ers Association solemnly swore its members 
to stick by the "gentlemen's agreement." 
With a couple of exceptions, all agreed. 

The agreement, reiterated and reaffirmed, 
was short-lived, and now the lid is off and 
the bars are down. Where a house has four 
changes a week, three are likely to be a 
double program. Houses charging from 15 
to 25 cents run doubles on 10-cent nights, 
twice or more times a week. Double bills 
on Sunday have made their appearance at 
houses which hitherto scorned the practice. 
Two features and a program of shorts, or 
one feature and two shorts are apt to be 
billed as a "mammoth triple program." 

The Independent Theatre Owners in Kan- 
sas City even went so far as to appoint a 
grievance committee with powers to inves- 
tigate violations of the pact and report back 
to the membership for consideration. But 
this is seemingly useless, as no penalties are 
imposed and the association is powerless 
to enforce the agreement. 

Generally, exhibitors give two reasons 
for failure of the various "gentlemen's 
agreements" : Conditions and the fact that 
some exhibitors will not adhere to the regu- 
lations 100 per cent. Where an exhibitor 
is willing to stick to single features, his com- 
petition starts double billing, and the first 
exhibitor has to follow suit to keep business. 
At least that is the general excuse. 

What the remedy is, exhibitors are not 
saying. In the meantime, catch-as-catch-can 
rules prevail. 

E. M. Herr, Ex-President 
Of Westinghouse, Is Dead 

Edwin Musser Herr, who had been presi- 
dent of the Westinghouse Electric & Manu- 
facturing Company from 1911 to 1929, died 
at his home in New York last Saturday at 
the age of 72. 



Paramount Lists 
$5,206,887 Loss 
For 3rd Quarter 

Paramount Publix Corp., in its consoli- 
dated statement, which includes subsidiary 
companies, reports a combined net loss, ex- 
clusive of capital losses which were charged 
to capital surplus, of $5,206,887 for the 
three months to October 1, 1932, after de- 
ducting interest, depreciation and all 
other charges and reserves. This compares 
with a loss of $8,199,544, reported for the 
three months ending July 2, 1932, and a 
profit of $1,252,000 for the third quarter of 
1931. 

During the period, a reserve was pro- 
vided for depreciation of fixed assets 
amounting to $2,884,634, of which $2,659,- 
634 was charged off and the balance of 
$225,000 was capitalized to film production 
cost. 

The corporation proposes to provide re- 
serves for revaluation of fixed assets as of 
April 3, 1932, which reserves will be 
charged against the capital surplus which 
was created by the stockholders in changing 
the common stock of the company from 
shares without par value to shares with par 
value of $10. When these reserves are 
placed on the books, there will be a saving 
in depreciation of approximately $750,000 
for the three months to October 1, 1932, 
which adjustment will reduce the three 
months' loss to approximately $4,457,000. 

Mclntyre, Clarke Associate, 
Commits Suicide in New York 

D. E. Mclntyre, executive associate of 
Harley L. Clarke for some years, who com- 
mitted suicide by jumping from an upper 
floor of the St. Moritz Hotel in New York 
last week, was buried this week in Boston. 
Mr. Mclntyre handled the Fox studio on 
the Coast during the absence of Winfield 
Sheehan. His work with certain of the 
utilities enterprises of Mr. Clarke led to his 
being sent to Hollywood to study the pro- 
duction situation. 

His recommendations for economy re- 
sulted in his taking over operation of the 
plant for about six months, after which he 
returned to New York. He is reported to 
have had no business affiliations at the time 
of his death. Mr. Mclntyre had been suffer- 
ing from an ailment in his neck for some 
time and Chicago physicians had suggested 
he return for treatment after the first of 
the year. 

Nat Saland Resigns as 
Craft Laboratory Head 

Nat Saland, a pioneer in the laboratory 
field, announced his resignation Wednesday 
as president of Craft Film Laboratory, New 
York. Mr. Saland, who joined Craft in 
1929 after operating independently, also re- 
signed from the directorate. 




It was WARM with 
"Hilda" in "What 
Price Glory" 




A NEW DAM 

has them 



SCRAPP')* , 








HAT'S NOTHING to 



makes 



'(for 



Flagg and Quirt . . . back again . . . and 
cockier than ever. New cock-eyed 
gags. New knockout dames headed 
by Lupe (Voluptuous) Velez. New 
records as these frolicking, flirting, 
fighting fools convulse the nation 
with antics that put belly-laughs 
where they belong. 




EDMUND LOWE 
VICTOR McLAGLEN 
LUPE VELEZ 
EL BRENDEL 



Directed by John Blystone 

rox picture 




HOTTER and PEPPIER 




than 

"WHAT PRICE GLORY" 

"COCK EYED WORLD" 

"WOMEN 
OF ALL NATIONS" 






December 3 1, 1 932 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



17 



FASCINATING PICTURE CAN BE MADE 



FIREBIRD 

Judith Anderson and Henry Stephenson 
(a corking team) pulled a well-bred crime 
thriller out of Lajos Zilahy's (Budapest) 
"Firebird." Why it is called "Firebird" I 
do not know. 

As a stage play, it is rather dull and 
leaky, it all having been done once before 
by one Oscar Wilde in "Lady Winder- 
mere's Fan." But when the Mystery Squad 
of scenario pluggers in Hollywood and a 
hand-picked, high-bred cast who can move 
in ultra-swell Budapest circles squared off 
a fascinating picture can be made of this 
play for those who, like myself, would walk 
away from a Camille and walk a mile for 
a good crime story. 

Here are the angles: In a swell apart- 
ment house an actor — matinee idol and a 
girl-tumbler — have been murdered. 

In this house lives the owner, his wife 
and daughter. He is a mighty fellow in the 
councils of the Hungarian government. He 
(Henry Stephenson) tries to ferret out 
who did the job. He doesn't like actor- 
killing on his property. 

He is unconsciously running down his 
wife (with the aid of the Police Commis- 
sioner). She finally confesses the crime. 
She was the actor's mistress and the latter 
threatened exposure. The Big Fellow is 
inexorable. His wife must face the music. 

But the Police Commissioner (Montagu 
Love) suddenly says Tush! and Bull! He 
has witnesses that she (Judith Anderson) 
was out of the house during the hour the 
crime was committed. Here is a tense and 
exciting second act. We all remain men- 
tally cock-eyed in our seats guessing who 
killed the actor. Percy Hammond said it 
was Lee Shubert. I guessed Sam Goldwyn. 

Well, Mates, it was the daughter, whom 
we only saw once for a moment in the pro- 
logue. She was having an affair with her 
Clark Gable when in a dispute the gun 
(there's always a gun) went off. And the 
mother tried to take the blame. But the 
girl goes off to jail — and is probably ad- 
judged not guilty and buried in flowers for 
killing another ham. 

Picture value, 90 per cent. 

SINGAPORE 

This play by Robert Keith contains con- 
ventional, and therefore, generally profit- 
able, picture material. It is for those who 
like to take their East hot off the passion- 
griddle. 

We'll take you somewhere east of Suez 
where a man can raise a thirst, where there 
"ain't" no Ten Commandments and a direc- 
tor can do his worst — and still click at the 
box-office. 

Eric Hope is a young Englishman who 
works for a big-time Sultan. Eric has a 
bungalow in Singapore. He had also in 
his bungalow Malaya, a pretty half-breed 



Is DeCasseres' Opinion of Play 
"Firebird"; Critic Takes Stock 
Of the Staged Latest Output 

by BENJAMIN DeCASSERES 



girl (played with a ravishing It-noose by 
Suzanne Caubaye). Naturally, Eric and 
Malaya are — yes, just as you thought. 

Now, the gasp-and-pop-eye angle (called 
the Creeping Menace in old Fort Lee days) 
gets working when Eric's bride comes out 
from England. Malaya naturally becomes 
active. Her meal ticket is sinking into a 
Depression. 

So — Malaya by peeping here and listen- 
ing there discovers that something is 
a-doin' between Eric's bride and the Sultan. 
She even hears the bride say she'd like to 
see hubby bumped off so she could become 
La Sultana and wear the big "jools." 

So the Sultan brings his cobras to court 
with a gang of goona-goona dancing 
wenches (grand old picture stuff now be- 
gins to jell) and while the revels are at 
their flurriest the Sultan has one of the 
cobras sting the wife to death. 

Well, it won't need a Rupert Hughes to 
make a picture of this, anyhow. 

Picture value, 90 per cent. 

THE PERFECT 
MARRIAGE 

Should old married people spill the beans 
to one another about what happened when 
they were newly married and the flood was 
still beyond the control of Will Hays' Com- 
mandments ? 

That is the theme of Arthur Goodrich's 
new play, "The Perfect Marriage." A 
chateau in Auvergne, France. A famous 
aged playwright and his wife are about to 
celebrate their fiftieth wedding anniversary. 
They have had a peaceful time of it. The 
President of France and other bourgeoises 
send their congrats. They bill and coo like 
two old people will. 

But in pops the Devil — Miss Fay Bainter. 
She had been the playwright's secretary in 
years agone and she knows where the 
bodies of both the husband's and wife's 
early infidelities are buried. In fact, she 
herself is the old man's sin. 

We fade back forty-five years (grand 
transformation of all actors and actresses) 
and we see just how the two old happy 
people cheated on one another. An old 
fellow in the first act was the wife's boy 
friend. 

Back to the anniversary celebration — the 
cat is out of the family bag. Great swearing 
and wringing of hands and threats. But 
all's well that ends Broadway. Clever. 

Picture value, 50 per cent. 

AUTUMN 
CROCUS 

With the success of "Music in the Air" 
and "Autumn Crocus" (by C. L. Anthony) 
we may expect a craze for the bucolic, the 



pastoral, the yodeler, Tyrolean troubadours 
and romances in mountain moonlight. 
Away with goona-goona and Bali. Comes 
now the Alps ! 

"Autumn Crocus" contains a picture, a 
pretty picture, a sweet picture. It is laid 
in the Tyrol. There is an inn. Ruling this 
inn is the latest New York sensation, 
Francis Lederer. He's an English actor 
and he's got Clark Gable, John Gilbert, 
John Barrymore, Clive Brook and all the 
rest laid out flat so far as the girls go. 
They say six picture producing companies 
have already opened their safes to Francis. 

The story: An English Lady in Spec- 
tacles (Patricia Collinge) falls in love with 
the inn-keeper. They meet on a mountain- 
side where the Englishwoman is willing 
to take a plunge into sex-life. But he 
informs her that he has a wife. She 
nearly falls down the mountain. But, still, 
afterward, she thinks she'll take a dip into 
what every woman should know. But now 
her old-maid friend warns her that familiar- 
ity breeds babies. Ouch ! 

Well, nothing happens. The Tyroleans 
sing, the harpist plays his harp and the 
English lady goes away. 

There are other side issues, somewhat 
comic, in the inn. The public is strong for 
the play — and there are many good picture 
angles in it. And there are so many idle 
Alps sets at present in Hollywood ! 

Picture value, 40 per cent. 

DEAR JANE 

When crime begins to wane, when we 
get fed up on lounge-pawing and when the 
Marx Brothers and Schnozzle have banked 
twelve millions for their picture getaway, 
then, maybe, some director will turn yearn- 
ingly toward something soft, dreamy, old- 
fashioned, with minuets, moonlight, eigh- 
teenth-century gurgles and giggles, Sam 
Johnson, Sir Joshua Reynolds, Davy Gar- 
rick, Jimmy Boswell — and the Battle of 
Trafalgar done in the old tank (long shot). 

He can find all this in "Dear Jane," the 
first new production of Eva Le Gallienne's 
Civic Repertory Company. It concerns love 
episodes in the life of Jane Austen, famous 
English novelist. 

Jane (played delightfully and without a 
trace of psychological stuffing by Josephine 
Hutchinson) giggles and flirts and jilts 
three lovers. The third is a Nelson hero 
(1798), and as he is about to marry Jane 
she quits his castle to resume the produc- 
tion of book-worm fodder. 

Joseph Schildkraut stalks through "Dear 
Jane," in which the motion picture angles 
are dependent on a change in film styles. 
For my part, I'm thirsty to see some old- 
time screen romance as clean as a Method- 
ist angel. 

Picture value, 10 per cent. 



18 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 



26 BOOKS AND PLAYS PURCHASED; 
HOLLYWOOD SEEKS STORY SOURCES 



Nine Producers Buy Material 
During November; Total Less 
Than October; Paramount, 
Fox Lead with Six Purchases 

Nine producers concluded negotiations 
during November for motion picture rights 
to 26 books and plays. Paramount and Fox 
each bought six; Metro acquired four; Radio 
and Warners took three each. Columbia, 
Fanchon Royer, Reliance and Universal 
each bought one. 

Story buys during November were slight- 
ly fewer than in October when producers 
negotiated rights to 28. Since March 1, 
which marked the real beginning of story 
activities for current season production, in- 
dependent producers and large companies, 
combined, bought 184 books and plays. 

New types of stories for pictures and the 
cultivation of additional sources of material 
are problems which are currently occupying 
the attention of Hollywood as never before. 
The pointed suggestion that plays stress 
realism too greatly and do not realize the 
value of a return to idealism was voiced by 
Actors' Equity, which argues that people 
must be "desperately tired of stories of dis- 
aster, of faithlessness, of sordid characters 
and evil deeds." Equity is "convinced that 
this is a strategic point and a favorable mo- 
ment to shift the emphasis" in plots. How 
fast and far the swing may travel in the 
other direction "may safely be left to the 
general temper of the time," Equity said, 
"but to the first dramatists and producers 
who strike the right note there will go both 
profit and honor." 

Meanwhile William LeBaron, producing 
executive, said in Hollywood that news- 
papermen are finding a warm welcome at 
the studios. "With the stage and book- 
publishers able to provide only a small per- 
centage of the vehicles necessary to meet the 
ever-increasing picture output, the pro- 
ducers," he said, "must look to the men and 
women who write the daily newspapers of 
America." 

Before returning to Hollywood, Mervyn Le- 
Roy, director, said in New York that today the 
story transcends the director, star, players and 
technical staging. 

A word of advice to writers was passed on 
by Frederick Melcher, editor of Publishers' 
Weekly, who said last week that by writing 
books that children like to read, an author can 
best make certain of being remembered. He 
cited Mark Twain and other popular stories. 
However, few of these have ever been success- 
fully produced in celluloid. 

An analysis of the stories and plays purchased 
during November for motion picture production 
discloses many well-known authors represented, 
including I. A. R. Wylie, Theodore Dreiser, 
Gene Fowler, Noel Coward, Ann Bridge, Eric 
Noel, Zane Grey, and others. A complete list 
of the November purchases follows : 

Columbia 

Murder of the Circus Queen, a Thatcher 
Colt detective story, by Anthony Abbot; 
adaptation by Milton Raison ; starring 
Adolphe Menjou. 

Fox 

Warrior's Husband, play by Julian Thomp- 
son ; for Jesse Lasky. 



Dangerously Yours, by Eric Noel ; featuring 
Warner Baxter and Mfriam Jordan. 

MoMMER, by Jerry Horwin ; starring Henrietta 
Crosman. 

Peking Picnic, prize novel by Ann Bridge; 

adaptation by Irene Kuhn and Harry Chand- 

lee ; for Jesse Lasky. 
I Loved You Wednesday, play. 
Pilgrimage, by L A. R. Wylie; John Ford 

directing ; featuring Norman Foster and 

Frank Craven. 

Fanchon-Royer 

Behind Jury Doors, by Frank Fenton; adap- 
tation by Jack Neville; releasing through 
Mayfair. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

Men Must Fight, a play by Reginald and S. 
K. Laurence. 

Excess Baggage, a play by John McGowan; 
made as a silent in 1927. 

Another Language, a play by Arthur J. Beck- 
hard and Rose Franken. 

He Who Gets Slapped, a play by Leonid 
Andreyev ; silent version made in 1926. 

Paramount 

Queen Was in the Parlor, romantic comedy, 
by Noel Coward ; adaptation by Edwin Justus 
Mayer; direction by Stuart Walker; starring 
Claudette Colbert. 

Shoe the Wild Mare, by Gene Fowler. 

Jennie Gerhardt, by Theodore Dreiser; star- 
ring Sylvia Sidney; direction by Marion 
Gering ; production by B. P. Schulberg. 

Great Magoo, comedy-romance from the play 
by Ben Hecht and Gene Fowler. 

Chrysalis, a play by Rose Albert Porter. 

Under the Tonto Rim, western, by Zane Grey ; 
starring Kent Taylor ; direction by Henry 
Hathaway. 

RKO Radio 

Romance of a Spahi, by Pierre Loti. 
Green Mansions, South American jungle 

story, by W. H. Hudson; Merian Cooper 

will produce. 
Greta, the Great, by Louis Heifetz and Neil 

Brandt; Joseph Schnitzer and Samuel Zier- 

ler will produce. 

Reliance 

Mr. Helen Green, by Prescott Chaplin and 
William Robson; for United Artists release; 
Edward Small will produce. 

Universal 

Terror Trail, by Grant Taylor; adaptation by 
Jack Cunningham ; direction by Armand 
Schaefer. 

Warner Brothers 

Red Meat, by David Karsner. 

Junior Republic, by Islin Auster ; Edward 
Chodorov will adapt. 

Ed-Lady, by Carl Erickson and David Boehm ; 
featuring Gene Raymond ; direction by How- 
ard Bretherton and William Keighley. 

Hollywood Writers Busy 

Meanwhile writers at practically every studio 
in Hollywood were busily adapting books and 
plays for immediate production. Assignments 
included : 

Columbia 

Jeanne Cohen was appointed eastern story 
editor. The scenario staff was augmented by 



All Companies Bought 184 
Books, Plays Since March 
When Season Began; Seek- 
ing New Source of Material 

four playwrights, including: Lew Levenson, 
Dore S chary, Edwin Gilbert and Lawrence 
Pohle. Adaptation assignments were, Charles 
Condon on "Obey the Law" ; William Kay, 
"Public Be Damned" ; Gertrude Purcell, "Cock- 
tail Hour." Frank Dolan and Charles Auer- 
bach were assigned to write an original. 

Fox 

Writers signed were : Sidney Mitchell, Lex 
Neal, Grace Perkins, Horace Jackson, Gladys 
Lehman, Kate Horton and William Conselman. 

Freuler Film 

F. McGrew Willis finished an original and 
started dialogue and continuity; Edward Sin- 
clair was writing two originals. 

Metro-Soldwyn-Mayer 

Writers signed included : John Wexley, John 
Lawson and F. A. Mitchell Hedges. John 
Mahin's contract was extended and William 
Faulkner completed an original for Joan Craw- 
ford. 

Monogram 

Columbia loaned Charles Logue to adapt 
"Black Beauty." 

Paramount 

Additions to the scenario staff included: 
Llewellyn Hughes, Robert N. Lee, Manuel 
Seff, Glenn Tryon, formerly an actor. Bayard 
Veiller and Frank Butler. Randolph Scott's 
contract was renewed and Keene Thompson re- 
joined the staff. William H. Wright was ap- 
pointed assistant to Howard Hurley in the 
production department, having been transferred 
assistant director of scenarists. Erwin Gelsey, 
scenarist, was appointed assistant to B. P. 
Schulberg. Mr. Gelsey was with Warners. 
Dialogue-writing and adaptation assignments 
were : Harvey Gates, dialogue for "Mysterious 
Rider" ; Maurine Watkins on "Sanctuary" ; 
Lawrence Hazard, dialogue on "Eleven Lives" ; 
Tiffany Thayer and Vincent Lawrence on an 
original ; Joseph Lovett and Joseph Moncure 
March, to adapt "Jennie Gerhardt," and Joseph 
Mankiewicz, to adapt "Good Company." 

RKO Radio 

Radio officials signed the following writers : 
G. B. Stern, Felix Riesenberg, Dick Grace, 
Harold Shumate, Joe Mankiewicz, Henry 
Myers and Philip MacDonald. Rosalie Stew- 
art, stage producer, succeeded Kenneth Mac- 
gowan as scenario editor. Keene Thompson was 
assigned to write an original and Bob Tasker 
will collaborate with Fulton Oursler on adapt- 
ing "Great Jasper." 

Universal 

Arthur Brilant was signed to prepare the 
scenario of "Suicide Club." Other assignments 
were Philip McKee, to adapt "Black and White 
Clown" ; George Green, on "Out on Parole" ; 
Don Ryan, on "Black Pearl," and William 
Harburt to dialogue "Only Yesterday." 

Warner Brothers 

Charles Kenyon and Sidney Sutherland were 
adapting "Red Meat." 




PALMY DAYS' 



THIS SWEEPING'i 



THE 



V. 




FIRST TIME ON THE 
AMERICAN SCREEN! 

A real bull-fight with savage Miura bulls! 
. . . and the great American Matador 

SIDNEY FRANKLIN 

Sensation of 35 countries! Performing the 
heart-stopping feats that made him famous 





theSAMUEL 0 



AND ''WHOOPEE" WERE ONLY CURTAIN-RAISERS TO 



BREATHLESS PANORAMA OF ENTERTAINMENT 




It's here! Ready for you to play! The dashing Mexican 
bull-fighting romance with EDDIE as a pop-eyed 
matador! Funny? Screaming! But thrill with the yell- 
ing, frenzied thousands as men brave death in 
the bull-ring! Revel in the glittering gay fiesta, as 
700 beautiful dancers sway to one glorious song! 






KID FHM 



with LYDA ROBERT! 

The Hotcha Blonde Comedienne 

SIDNEY FRANKLIN 

* Famous American Matador 

AND THE GORGEOUS GOLDWYN GIRLS 





3LDWYN PRODUCTION 





^JUST LOOK AT THESE LINES! 

• "Knockout! Funniest Cantor picture yet! Grandest screen 
performance the writer has ever seen!" 

— N. y. Illusfroted Doily News 

• "One of the biggest causes for merriment ever offered in a 
talking picture . . . dazzles v\/ith its spectacular musical numbers." 

— L A. Times 

• "One of the funniest, most exciting and most eye-filling 
comedies yet offered on the screen." 

— Los Angeles Herold and Express 

• "a triumph for all concerned." — N. Y. American 

"EDDIE CANTOR 




THE KID FROM SPAIN 



// 



(^vv '''' • "Smash hit . . . the king of cinema musical comedy." 

fc j y • — Hollywood Citizen News 

• "It's about four editions of the 'Ziegfeld Follies' wrapped 
into one pretentious package." — Motion Picture Herald 

• "if they would all be like this, theatres would need rubber 
walls." — N. Y. Exhibitor 

• "IT SHOULD GRAB ALL THE MONEY LYING AROUND, SO 
STEP UP, MR. EXHIBITOR AND CUT YOURSELF A SLICE OF IT!" 

— Hollywood Reporter 

UNITED ARTISTS PICTURE 

PRINTED IN U. S. A. 




December 31, 19 3 2 MOTION PICTURE HERALD 19 



CENSORSHIP-A BOX OFFICE FACTOR 



It is a common statement among film peo- 
ple — ^production, distribution and exhibi- 
tion — that the right answer is the box office 
answer. The Academy of Motion Picture 
Arts and Sciences may present awards for 
artistic achievement, clubs and societies 
may vote this picture or that highly com- 
mendable. Resolutions, or threats, may be 
issued against gangster films, sex films. 
Humane societies may object to western 
pictures because, they say, horses are some- 
times injured in wild riding episodes. But, 
says the industry, what does the picture do 
at the box office? Only there, it holds, may 
the great mass of the public voice its ap- 
proval or disapproval. 

There are some authorities who differ 
emphatically with those who hold for the 
box office standard of measurement in mo- 
tion picture entertainment. There are those 
who hold that the purveyors of such enter- 
tainment, in any of its branches, have a 
moral responsibility to the public, to the 
wide world, in the matter of film presenta- 
tions. Speaking for the industry, Will Hays 
has acknowledged that responsibility on 
numerous occasions ever since he became 
affiliated with the motion picture. The 
adoption of a code of regulation regarding 
subjects and their treatment in films by the 
producers themselves is an admission that 
such a responsibility exists. 

Nevertheless, and more especially in these 
difficult days when picture theatre attend- 
ance has hit an all-time low, the box office 
standard is quoted by many leaders as the 
only important one. Pictures must be made 
for a profit, or the picture business will 
cease to exist, they properly declare. We 
cannot make artistic successes and commer- 
cial failures. We cannot produce films for 
the edification and approval of certain 
classes, if the masses will not support them. 
We must make pictures that the public will 
pay for. 

Public Opinion Important 

Looking at the matter, then, from purely 
a "box office" angle, let us see whether or 
not the moral responsibility is definitely 
related to the dollars-and-cents problem of 
the producer and exhibitor. For the mo- 
ment let us forget about artistic ambitions, 
ethics, religious views, personal codes or 
any other standard of judgment for motion 
pictures. What is the box office reaction if 
pictures step beyond the commonly accepted 
limits set, for example, by the producers in 
their own Code of Production Ethics? 

It is a favorite saying of Will Hays that 
"every one in America has two businesses — 
his own and the motion picture business." 
By that he means, of course, that the uni- 
versality of motion picture entertainment is 
such that almost every person who has 
reached the age of reason forms some per- 
sonal opinions about pictures, or, if not 
opinions, at least personal tastes. So far 
as millions of people are concerned, these 
views are either not expressed at all, or 



Regulation, Whether Statutory 
Or Informal, Affects the Box 
Office and Industry's Income 

by LEO MEEHAN 

Hollywood Staff Correspondent 



are expressed within a very small group of 
personal associates. It is the word-of- 
mouth expression which so often affects at- 
tendance at a given picture, favorably or 
adversely. Obviously, therefore, it is a box 
office factor, even though it is difficult to 
actually analyze and compile statistically. 

But there is a channel of expressed pub- 
lic opinion which can be measured with 
considerable accuracy, and that is the cen- 
sorship, statutory or informal, which is 
placed upon motion picture entertainment, 
the potency and extent of which is some- 
times misunderstood or lost sight of by peo- 
ple within the industry. Whether we ap- 
prove of it or not, the motion picture 
business is a regulated business, regulated 
by the public or their constituted agencies. 
It faces regulations affecting its income just 
as definitely as do the railroads through the 
Interstate Commerce Commission, or big 
business through the Sherman Act, or radio 
broadcasting through the Federal Radio 
Commission. 

Every Film Must Run Gantlet 

It is estimated that the population of this 
country which provides 60 per cent of the 
revenue earned by the average picture has 
set up mandatory regulations governing 
motion pictures in one form or another. 
Now this is a cold, passionless box office 
fact. Whether these regulations are old 
fashioned, prejudiced, unjustified, un- 
American, Victorian, archaic, blue-nosed or 
the "will of the minority," the fact remains 
that every motion picture which comes out 
of Hollywood must run the gantlet of some 
sort of censorship before it reaches the 
public. It should be obvious, therefore, to 
any thinking person, that a film which is 
objectionable to any considerable portion 
of this regulated territory is going to be 
adversely affected as to box office returns. 
Even though the liberal application of scis- 
sors to the film eliminates objectionable epi- 
sodes or dialogue, it is likely that such 
elimination will so emaciate the quality of 
the whole picture that people who see the 
revised versions will be disappointed and 
thus become more or less alienated or in- 
different toward motion picture entertain- 
ment. Imagine, if you will, a book reader 
purchasing a novel or borrowing one from 
the library, only to discover that whole 
paragraphs, or even whole chapters, had 
ijeen clipped from the book by the librarian 
or the bookseller ! Would there be a yell ? 

Unfortunately, in the case of the motion 
picture, it is difficult, if not impossible, for 
the layman, the average picture goer, to tell 
whether or not sequences and dialogue have 
been eliminated before he sees a picture. All 
he knows is that the picture is jumpy, or 
that things happen or are said without rela- 
tion to something else in the story, or that 
characters do things without any apparent 
rhyme or reason. He goes out with a feel- 
ing of dissatisfaction, with his expressed or 
inarticulate criticism aimed at the producer 



who made such a senseless picture. And 
possibly the next time he contemplates go- 
ing to the "movies" he turns on the radio 
instead, stays at home. 

Eight great states, among them some of 
the largest in the union, have official state 
censoring agencies. With the exception of 
one, Florida, they all are functioning ac- 
tively. The two most populous states in 
the nation are included: New York and 
Pennsylvania. A substantial loss of box 
office revenue from a motion picture in 
these two states alone spells the difference 
between a profit and a loss to the producer. 
Add to these the other states — Kansas, Ohio, 
Maryland, Virginia and Massachusetts — 
and it is immediately evident that the re- 
strictions of state censorship alone have a 
potentially vital bearing upon the box office 
results. 

A motion picture which is banned wholly, 
or in any considerable portion, in these 
states, or even some of them, is seriously 
crippled at the box office so far as the pro- 
ducer is concerned. Furthermore, exhibi- 
tors must consequently be more or less af- 
fected by censorship deletions which 
materially alter the original version and in 
most cases lower its value as entertainment. 
Saw a leg off a chair and you still can sit 
on it, but it isn't very satisfactory. Same 
way with a picture which has been chopped 
up in a cutting room. 

Local Boards in Many Cities 

Statutory censorship does not end with 
the aforementioned states. There are ap- 
proximately 267 municipal boards of censor- 
ship in these United States in addition to 
the state boards. And -they include some of 
our largest key cities, where first run rev- 
enue is important. Chicago, Atlanta, Bir- 
mingham, Ala. ; Denver, Boston, St. Louis, 
Milwaukee, Detroit, Portland, Ore. ; Spring- 
field, 111. ; Evanston, 111. ; Kansas City, Mo. ; 
Pasadena, Calif. ; Dallas and Houston, 
Texas ; Memphis, Madison, Wis. ; Okla- 
homa City, Glendale, Calif. ; Palo Alto, 
Calif. ; Seattle, New Orleans, Sacramento — 
these are among the many larger centers of 
population which have set up local boards 
which must pass upon the moral and ethical 
merits of every production before it may be 
exhibited. Eliminate the box office returns, 
or cripple them, from several of these cen- 
ters, and again the "box office" of a produc- 
tion has been substantially affected. Here 
again the point should be emphasized that 
a picture may be so revised, such cuts made, 
that a permit to exhibit is obtained, but the 
strength of the original attraction has been 
more or less sapped, and what is left is 
more likely to resemble buttermilk than 
cream, so far as its entertainment value is 
concerned. And the public, not knowing or 
caring, probably, what their duly appointed 
censors have done, thumb their noses at the 
picture as poor or indifferent product from 
the studios of Hollywood, losing their taste 

(Continued on page 26) 



20 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 



UFA AND TOBIS UPHOLD GERMANY'S 
FILM BUSINESS IN TIME OF TRIAL 



Ufa's Profit of $6,960,000 in 
Fiscal Year Presents Contrast 
to Experiences of Emelka, 
DLS and Sudfilm Connpanies 

by HANS TINTNER 

Berlin Correspondent 

UFA's financial statement showing a 
profit of $6,960,000 for the fiscal year end- 
ed May 31 must be considered imposing, in 
view of the general business situation in the 
motion picture market of Germany. 

Ufa and Tobis today are the supports of 
the German film business against develop- 
ments which in the last few weeks have 
seen the announcement of insolvency of sev- 
eral companies which for many a year had 
the best financial standing in the European 
film industry, such as Emelka, DLS and 
Sudfilm. 

The Emelka was the representative film 
company of Southern Germany, with Mun- 
ich as headquarters. Splendid studios, a 
considerable theatre circuit and a progres- 
sive production policy were assets of this 
company. Many a fight was carried on for 
its control; even the Reich was once inter- 
ested in it. Finally the majority passed 
into French financial circles and recently 
it was rumored that the radical German 
Hitlerites tried to get the leadership. 

The DLS was the syndicate of German 
exhibitors. The sale of product was largely 
secured by the exhibitors united in the syn- 
dicate. 

But here, as in the case of the Siidfilm, 
the economic situation and the pronounced- 
ly faulty investment have finally led to in- 
solvency. 

Political Background 

The Ufa statement, however, is in decid- 
ed contrast and its astounding assets must 
not be overlooked. A comparison with 
other industries, in which likewise can be 
observed the development and concentration 
of the most efficient groups as well as the 
decline and dissolution of the weak individ- 
uals, is not sufficient for a clear under- 
standing of the Ufa announcement. 

To appreciate the unrivaled superiority 
of the Ufa it is necessary to consider the 
details which have distinguished this com- 
pany for many a year from the rest of the 
industry. 

The Ufa sound news, to define it with the 
terminology of the newspapers, is a semi- 
official information bureau. The offices of 
this large organization could be called the 
German Film Ministry, although not offi- 
cially so. There is an extremely close 
understanding between German govern- 
mental circles and the Ufa, and the mutual 
contacts are numerous. Whereas in other 
countries even the most powerful film com- 
pany will exclusively concentrate its prod- 
uct to the greatest possible profit, the Ufa 
is taking other viewpoints into consideration 
so that a separation of its production policy 
from political background scarcely is pos- 
sible. 

In 1931-1932 Ufa produced 19 German 



pictures, 11 films in a foreign language, 21 
German cultural films, 21 cultural films in 
a foreign language, 11 shorts, 179 issues of 
sound news and 149 educational and adver- 
tising films. 

Some time ago the Ufa started production 
of a special edition of its weekly sound 
news for foreign countries. The activity 
of the Ufa studios at Tempelhof and at 
Neubabelsberg was satisfactory. In 1931-32 
the studios were occupied for two-thirds of 
the time available. In 1930-31 this figure 
amounted to 83 per cent and it was 64 per 
cent in 1929-30. It was easily possible for 
the Ufa to realize a considerably higher 
percentage of employment in its studios but 
the company did not intend to follow the 
credit policy of the other Berlin studios. 

It is frankly admitted that the credit 
granted from the various studios to the 
film producers has frequently made the pro- 
prietor of the studio an involuntary part- 
ner of the producer. 

The same reasons led to a 25 per cent 
decline of the turnover of the Afifa, the 
editing company of the Ufa. 

Controls 100 Theatres 

The Ufa controls mare than 100 theatres 
with a seating capacity of 103,219. In 1931- 
32 these theatres registered 30,700,000 at- 
tendance, compared with 29,300,000 in 
1930-31 period. By a reduction of admis- 
sion prices the income of the theatres de- 
clined by 10 per cent in spite of the aug- 
mentation of patronage. 

In the last season the Ufa has acquired 
14 new houses, two from the Emelka, one 
with 2,175 seats in Munich, and the other, 
seating 1,043, at Nuremberg. 

The Ufa has 73 branch offices, among 
them the Ufa ton Verlag, manufacturing 
and selling Ufa records. The daily sales 
of this subsidiary amount to 6,000 records. 

Ufa has 14 branches in foreign coun- 
tries which in 1931-32 reported an income 
of 11,000,000 reichsmarks, an increase of 
50 per cent. The whole German film ex- 
port business of 1931-32 is given as 20 mil- 
lion reichsmarks, Ufa being represented 
with half this figure. 

The net profit of the Ufa in 1931-32 
amounts to 2.019.583.77 reichmarks com- 
pared with 3,002,934.17 in the same period 
of the preceding year. No less than 14,- 
333,336.98 marks will be carried forward 
for the next season. 

The film holdings of the Ufa consist of 
1,680 feature films and 731 educationals. 

The close cooperation of the Ufa with 
Gaumont-British in England, and the re- 
cently signed agreement with France which 
in reality is for an unlimited, mutual ex- 
change of product, are expanding the Ufa's 
international activities. 



Skouras Returning to Coast 

Spyros Skouras, theatre operator, leaves 
New York for the Coast some time in Janu- 
ary to continue the survey of Fox West 
Coast theatres which was interrupted by 
a recent visit to New York. An option for 
renewal of operation of the circuit is due on 
February 10, which it is understood will be 
exercised. 



National Board 
Lists Best Films 

For the first time, the National Board of 
Review, through its Committee on Excep- 
tional Photoplays, has chosen the one best 
film out of all American pictures produced 
during the year. The choice for 1932 is 
"I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang," 
Warner Bros. < 

The National Board also announced its 
selection of the ten best American and the 
ten best foreign pictures for 1932. "The past 
year," the board stated, "while providing 
many pictures of excellence from an enter- 
tainment standpoint, has not offered many 
films as outstanding contributions to the 
art of the cinema. Therefore its list of the 
ten 'best' includes some that can accurately 
be called 'best' only in comparison with the 
rest of the year's output, because they are 
good examples of their type. The list of the 
ten best foreign films, outside of some that 
are outstandingly important, is presented 
on the same comparative basis," it is said. 
The titles of the pictures are listed alpha- 
betically : 
AMERICAN 

"As You Desire Me," "A Bill of Divorce- 
ment," "A Farewell to Arms," "I Am a 
Fugitive From a Chain Gang," "Madame 
Racketeer," "Payment Deferred," "Scar- 
face," "Tarzan," "Trouble in Paradise," 
"Two Seconds." 
FOREIGN 

"A Nous La Liberte," "Der Andere," 
"The Battle of Gallipoli," "Golden Moun- 
tains," "Kamferadschaft," "Madchen in Uni- 
form," "Der Raub," "Der Mona Lisa," "Re- 
served for Ladies," "The Road to Life," 
"Zwei Menschen." 

Roxy To Retain Name for 
Radio City Picture House 

S. L. (Roxy) Rothafel last week was 
granted permission by Federal Judge Fran- 
cis G. Caffey to use the name Roxy for the 
new motion picture theatre in Radio City, 
New York. This decision, concluding a 
long drawn out court battle, means that the 
Seventh avenue house must find another 
name. At the same time. Judge Caffey con- 
firmed the recommendation of Addison S. 
Pratt, special master who reviewed the case, 
that the use of the trademark, "Roxy The- 
atres Corporation," could not be taken from 
the old Roxy theatre group. 

"As I see it," the court ruled, "a cancella- 
tion contract dated January 27, 1931, wholly 
terminated the right of the defendant to call 
its theatre the Roxy, save only as specified 
in the cancellation contract itself for the pe- 
riod from March 29, 1931, when the resig- 
nation of Mr. Rothafel as manager of the 
theatre became effective, and September 11 
of this year, when the period of grace 
ended." Howard S. Cullman, receiver of 
the Roxy Theatres Corporation, stated that 
he had advised counsel to appeal from the 
decision. 



December 3 1, I 932 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



21 



illlilllll! 



THE CAMERA CEDCCTS 




AT RADIO CITY OPENING. Left: Merlin H. Aylesworth, NBC and RKO head, and Mrs. Aylesworth. Right: John D. Rockefeller, Jr. 






CHRISTMAS LUNCHEON Taking place just before the holiday, at the regular weekly meeting of the AMPA, at Sardi's m 
New York. Guests of honor shown are Lilian Miles, Capt. Bob Bartlett, Frankie Basch, Pat O'Brien Marcella Burke and George 
Raft. At extreme left is Al Slegel, a member. At extreme right is Rutgers Nielsen, vice-president of the society. 



22 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 





ii 



INTRUDING. On Warren William, First National star, 
as he manages a few minutes for a morning wash-up 
within the private precincts of his own home. How 
these still photographers do get around! 





HAROLD 
LLOVD 





RUSTICATING. Two of Fox's most cele- 
brated stars becoming "just folks" for 
the time being, while on location for 
"State Fair." They are, of course, Janet 
Gaynor and Will Rogers, and they are 
iust two of an all-star cast. 




CO N D iTO ec 




BERLIN AMERICANIZES ITS EXPLOITATION. To those used to Yankee ballyhoo methods, BLONDE WAVES. Marion Davies, 

there's nothing unusual in the erection of a large electric sign to exploit a picture. But MGM star. In a brand new portrait 

in Germany such costly and flamboyant media are noteworthy, and so we show what was featuring the Davies tresses. Miss 

done In Berlin to advertise the showing of Paramount's latest Harold Lloyd comedy, Davies, last seen In "Blondle of the 

"Movie Crazy." This sign is located on the famous Potsdamer Platz in Berlin. Follies," has no new vehicle scheduled. 



December 31, 1932 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



23 




THEATRES OF RADIO CITY OPENED. With the initial performances this week at the Music Hall and RKO Roxy, Radio City 
in the Rockefeller Center development in New York was placed in operation. These two theatres, pictured above, are capable of 
supplying entertainment to more than 9,600 persons at the same time. The Music Hall, devoted to vaudeville, light opera and 
extravaganza, seats over 6,000, while the RKO Roxy, presenting motion pictures and stage features, has a capacity of approxi- 
mately 3,600. Both houses are of modern architecture and decoration. The motion picture theatre employs no proscenium in 
its architectural scheme, and the walls are of wood. The Music Hall auditorium is in an arch pattern. 



TWO GREAT STARS IN PHILIP BARRY'S 




Sparkling romance . . . deep-rooted drama 
of a man, his wife . . . and the woman he 
could not marry who learned that in "The 
Animal Kingdom" we're only human after all. 




RKO RADIO Picture 

David O. Selznick. Executive Producer 



SENSATIONAL STAGE SUCCESS 



with Myma Loy . . William Gargan . . 
Neil Hamilton .. Henry Stephenson., 
nka Chase . . Directed by E. H. Griffith 




ANN HARDING 
LESLIE HOWARD 



in 



"THE ANIMAL 
KINGDOM" 

AN ATTRACTION WORTHY OF THE 
HONOR IT HAS WON ... the first picture 
to grace the screen of the New RKO ROXY 
THEATRE in Radio City, New York. 



26 



Two Radio City 
Theatres Lavish 

{Continued, from page 11) 

of wood, consisting of mahogany panels 
divided by strips of contrasting shade and 
grain. Adjacent to the stage opening are 
tiers of grills, illuminated from the rear and 
admitting the tones of the organ pipes. The 
ceiling is of plaster molded in a pattern and 
dominated decoratively by an immense chan- 
delier. Piercing the ceiling are apertures 
behind which are located small spotlights, 
which supply the major portion of the house 
illumination. The Roxy seats approximately 
3,600. 

The Roxy's opening program is charac- 
teristic of the policy to be followed. The 
theatre has a large symphony orchestra for 
overtures and incidental music, and a resi- 
dent ballet. Around these are built a stage 
program of dancing, musical and comic acts 
booked in. The opening screen program 
consisted of a newsreel which followed the 
dedication overture, augmented by a dance 
feature, and RKO Radio's "The . Animal 
Kingdom," which was given the final spot. 
This performance was the premiere of that 
production. 

The opening Music Hall program offered, 
in addition to numbers by the orchestra and 
resident ballet and chorus, Taylor Holmes 
in a musical dramatic sketch, aerialists, 
comedy by Sisters of the Skillet, Doctor 
Rockwell and H. Ray Bolger ; Fraulein 
Vera Schwarz of the Berlin Opera, the 
Tuskegee choir, an allegorical dance by 
Harald Kreutzberg, excerpts from "Car- 
men" featuring Titta Ruffo, Coe Glade, 
Aroldo Lindi and Patric Bowman, the 
Martha Graham dancers, Weber & Fields 
and a concluding minstrel number with De 
Wolf Hopper acting as a master of cere- 
monies. 

Among those present at the Music Hall 
opening, which was conducted on a more 
elaborate scale than that of the RKO 
Roxy, were John D. Rockefeller, Jr., 
Nelson Rockefeller, Owen D. Young, M. 
H. Aylesworth, David Sarnoff, Gen. 
James G. Harbord, Walter P. Chrysler, 
the acting mayor and mayor-elect of New 
York, Will H. Hays, Adolph Zukor, Jules 
Brulatour, Hope Hampton, Dr. A. H. Gian- 
nini, Major Edward Bowes, Eugene Zukor 
and innumerable others representing the 
financial and social as well as the theatrical 
worlds. 

Personnel of the Radio City theatre staffs, 
which are the same for both houses, is as 
follows : 

Leon Leonidofif, director of production; 
Robert Edmond Jones, general art director ; 
Erno Rapee, general musical director; 
Charles Previn, Macklin Marrow and Jo- 
seph Littau, associate conductors of the thea- 
tres' orchestras. 

Staff organists — Dick Liebert, Arthur 
Gutow, O. A. J. Parmentier and Betty 
Gould. 

James Reynolds, associate art director ; 
Florence Rogge, ballet director ; Desire De- 
frere, opera director : Lasar Galpern, asso- 
ciate ballet master ; Russell Markert, direc- 
tor of Roxyettes ; Leon Rosebrook, director 
of chorus ; Leo Russotto, in charge of radio 
programs; William Stern, stage manager; 
Eugene Braun, electrical engineer ; Harr5 
Hiller, chief sound engineer ; Arthur Smith, 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 

chief projectionist; Hattie Rogge, in charge 
of costumes. 

James H. Turner, chief of administration ; 
Charles W. Griswold, manager of theatres ; 
Martha W. Wilchinski, director of public- 
ity; S. Jay Kaufman, assistant to Roxy; 
Leah Klar, secretary to Roxy; David P. 
Canavan, in charge of maintenance ; Anne 
Beckerle, R. N., supervisor of Radio City 
hospitals. 

The openings were broadcast over NBC 
hookups. 

Censorship Called 
Box Office Factor 

(Continued from page 19) 

for motion picture entertainment. Thus the 
censored picture may not be vitally affected, 
but every subsequent attraction for some 
time is likely to feel the effect in declining 
weekly box office grosses through indiffer- 
ence upon the part of potential patrons. 

Here in America, however, there is still 
another important angle of censorship, too 
often "poo-poohed" by some picture makers. 
It is the gratuitous or unofficial censorship 
of a large group of organizations and indi- 
viduals who either control or partially affect 
the entertainment selections made by 
millions of people. Call them meddlers, 
bigots, parlor agitators or whatever you 
like, the fact remains that they are drops 
in the bucket, that they make up the ranks 
of those who have two businesses, "their 
own and the film business." Directly or in- 
directly, they have a bearing upon the box 
office receipts. 

And we should not forget that in addition 
to those whose interest and efforts are most 
sincere and honest, there are hordes of 
political fakirs and front-page publicity 
seekers who are smart enough to realize 
and use the possibilities of slinging mud at 
the "movies" to further their own selfish 
ends. They get and deserve only our con- 
tempt, but they exist, and from a purely box 
office business angle, we cannot ignore their 
existence. 

Powers Continues 
BIP Agreement 

Negotiations whereby P. A. Powers Pic- 
tures will continue distribution in America 
of the product of British International Pic- 
tures, English producer, were near comple- 
tion at press time. 

Arthur Dent, general manager of BIP, 
was scheduled to return to London from 
New York Wednesday night, following 
conclusion of negotiations. 



Gabriel Hess, MPPDA. 
Testifies in Quittner Suit 

Gabriel Hess, general counsel of the Mo- 
tion Picture Producers and Distributors of 
America, gave testimony on Wednesday in 
the damage suit brought against Paramount 
and others by Joseph Quittner, Middletown, 
N. Y., exhibitor. The trial is being heard 
before Justice McCook in federal court, 
New York. 



December 31, 1932 

Companies Adopt 
Board of Appeals 

(Continued from page 9) 

tral" territory, or in territory in which there 
is both an Allied and an MPTOA unit, the 
independent exhibitor or exhibitor parties to 
the dispute shall have the right to choose 
the independent representatives from panels 
designated individually by Allied and MP- 
TOA. 

Distributors likewise will select a panel in 
New York. This will rotate continuously in 
order to fulfill the plan's stipulation that no 
distributor may have a sales manager sit- 
ting on the board in cases to which the 
distributor is a party. 

A member of such board, before taking 
his seat, shall subscribe to an obligation, in 
a form to be agreed upon, to do full justice 
in every case on the facts presented, re- 
gardless of former associations, friendships 
or declarations. 

The board in every case shall have and 
consider all relevant facts relating to the 
dispute. For example, in disputes growing 
out of protection, the size and location of the 
theatres involved, their admission prices and 
operating policy, the feature of the pro- 
gram emphasized (whether pictures or 
vaudeville), the film rentals paid, the re- 
ceipts, advertising, type of neighborhood and 
patrons, and all other circumstances bearing 
on the competitive situation and the extent 
to which they can or do draw patronage one 
from another. The board, however, shall 
have the right to exclude all irrelevent evi- 
dence having no bearing on the issues and 
tending to delay. 

In the submission of disputes to the na- 
tional appeal board "every effort shall be 
made to constitute such submission a legal 
and binding arbitration, so far as the law 
will permit; and the agreement of the par- 
ties to accept the decision of the board as a 
binding award shall be a condition prece- 
dent to the right of any disputant to invoke 
its jurisdiction," according to the pact. 

In case the board's decision is evenly 
divided in any case, it will be necessary to 
call in a ninth or fifth member, as the case 
may be, and such odd member shall be the 
unanimous choice of the representatives sit- 
ting in the particular case. Failing unani- 
mous agreement on such odd member, the 
same shall, upon request of the board, be 
designated by the Governor of the State of 
New York, or other official or agency unan- 
imously agreed upon. 

The important obstacle to adoption of the 
appeals board revolved around situations 
where affiliated circuit interests, not fully 
controlled by the distributor, did not adopt 
the program. Obviously, this would leave 
the independents in the territory which is 
dominated by the affiliated circuit without 
any redress because these circuits would not 
be compelled to arbitrate. The method of 
settling disputes which might arise out of 
such situations, and which would involve 
protection, principally, is for a local com- 
mittee to meet with the dominant circuit to 
work out a protection schedule favorable 
to all. Then, if this is not successful, the 
question would be submitted to the national 
appeals board sitting as a conciliatory body. 
If the board is unable to affect a settlement 
its members may then "recommend" changes 
to the offending affiliated circuit. 



December 31, 1932 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



27 



|ii Ill 



ASIDES SL INTEKLLDES 



i;iii|i> 



By JAMES CUNNINGHAM 



In an exhausting (and how) interview with 
Mike Simmons, who signs his name with a 
Monogram, we learned that the film world is 
destined to wake up tomorrow only to discover 
that "Monogram Has the Right Idea." "This 
asserveration is not merely a declarative sen- 
tence," declared Monogram's minnesinger, who 
is more _popularly known around Times Square 
as "Six-Syllable Simmons." "It is a trade 
axiom, a committal of faith, a symbol of truth 
as bald as the mosque of Ophir." 

When pressed for further details, Mono- 
gram's lexicographer screwed a monocle tightly 
in the frame of his eyebrow, a stunt which he 
learned while editing a British picture, and 
avowed hotly : "Wherever I go, and I certainly 
do go places these days, as my batch of due 
bills will show, I am constantly reminded by 
discerning members of this industry that 
Monogram has the right idea." (Note, Mr. 
Simmons is also a press agent.) 

"I said to Ray Johnston, our president," he 
continued, "that these people can't be wrong. 
Who are we to say 'neigh'" (Monogram will 
soon release "Black Beauty"). 

"'AH right,' Mr. Johnson sighed, 'just to 
preclude any further titillating witticisms of 
that sort, have it your own way,' and so, be- 
ginning tomorrow, the company's official slogan 
will be, 'Monogram Has the Right Idea 1' " 
V 

Will Rogers was master of ceremonies at the 
dedication of the new writers' building on the 
Fox lot at Movietone City. He told the gath- 
ering that "we have two cornerstones for the 
building,: one for the first and one for the 
second mortgage." 

V 

The other day, a squad of policemen of 
the little town of HuU, in Quebec, paid a 
call on a gambling resort and carted away 
some of the best customers. When it was 
all over, the police blotter read like the tele- 
phone directory of Holl3nvood or Beverly 
Hills. Joe E. Brown's name was on it and 
so were those of Eddie Cantor, Doug Fair- 
banks, Jack Holt, Clark Gable, and even the 
dignified George Arliss, among others. 

V . 

Hollywood Herald's pithy personal para- 
graphs report that Bert Wheeler has a gold 
mine which insures him $100 a day for the 
rest of his life. . . . And that Jimmy (gang- 
ster) Cagney received a letter from a fan in 
the South who asked Jimmy to send a machine 
gun, because the writer was starting a small 
racket of his own. 

V 

Paramount pictures, the company claims, 
are being shown in more theatres, to more 
people than those of any other maker, and 
have been for the past 15 years. The sales 
department is hot after non-theatrical sales. 
Salesmen in the field are urged to sell every 
school, college and social center that has 
facilities for presenting pictures, except 
where competition is a barrier. 

V 

We recently wrote about Sue Carol's activi- 
ties, publicity and otherwise, in connection with 
adopting a baby for somebody else, while in 
New York. The following communication, in 
answer, was received from George Landy 
(Landy and Hunt, publicist, Hollywood) : 
"Although I haven't talked to Sue Carol 
or Nick Stuart since they advertised in New 
York in an effort to adopt a baby, I do want 
you to know that they have advised me that 
the baby Sue selected is being adopted by L. 
Lombardo, a brother of Guy Euid a member 
of his orgamization. 

"I don't know why Sue was intermediary, 
rather than the Lombardos getting the baby 
themselves; but, at least, in justice to her, 
you should know that — while she did get a 
lot of publicity out of it — a baby was adopted, 
so the kid gets a break, too." 



THE following inquiry to readers was re- 
ceived through Toys and Novelties, a. trade 
publication serving that field: 

"Decir Friend : 

"I know about this book. I read a picture 
book motion picture shows. Here's a toy that 
will bring crowds to me store for the first time 
in toy history, a practical real honest to good- 
ness precision made motion picture projector 
at a retail price which allows you to meet the 
greatest market. Here's the chance of lifetime 
to do the kind of merchandising- job you've 
dreamed about. Suggested list price $3.95 and 
a dam good profit for me. Get the Movie 
Master proposition now. 2 week sedary me 
$26.75 Union State Beuik cashier. I have money 
half dollar. Pocket book check cashier. I buy 
you 2 week $3.95. 1 borrow like that, moving 
show machine. I want to see motion picture 
profit. I am 32 years old. How much money 
motion picture. I thing longa reel — reel. Blue, 
green, yellow, black, red reel film show. 

"Merry & Christmas tree. Motion picture 
projectors. Now you write me a letter." 

V 

The "red terror" has struck the picture busi- 
ness. Following the kidnapping of six men 
from jail at Vacaville, Cal., and their resultant 
manhandling 15 miles from town, the citizenry 
of that otherwise peaceful community was 
thrown into fearful frenzy and now no one vvill 
venture forth at night. When word of the in- 
cident reached main street there immediately 
developed a rumor about a march of a "red 
army" into town. The Vacaville theatre's night 
shows are light. 

V 

Very observing people might notice in "The 
Sign of the Cross" replicas of the first fly- 
swatters used by mankind. Emperor Nero vvas 
the inventor. Noting one day the efficiency with 
which horses dispatched the flies which both- 
ered them, Nero caused 1,000 horses to be 
separated from their tails, which he distributed 
among the palaces of the empire. 

V 

Clark Gable has a very expensive new 16- 
cylinder automobile. "It really is economical 
in the long-run," explains Clark. "Every time 
a cylinder misses I save a quarter." 

V 

Metro offers this little news nugget: "At 
a recent party given by Jeannette MacDon- 
ald in honor of Lily Pons, noted operatic 
star, Wallace Beery was the chief mascu- 
line attraction, when he explained all the 
new wrestling holds he learned for his new 
picture, 'Flesh.' " 

V 

Fifty pounds of fog daily zvent into^ the latest 
screen drama of London life. It arrived every 
morning in cans, being nothing more than Rus- 
sian mineral oil, which is atomised in a series 
of sprays, under compressed air pressure, and 
then hangs about the buildings in a perfect 
imitation. Metro used it in "The Lady." 

V 

When death suddenly overtook Abraham E. 
Lefcourt, on November 13, it interrupted the 
career of what might have been a great power 
in motion pictures. Mr. Lefcourt was a close 
friend of Joseph M. Schenck. He had always 
nurtured an ambition to enter films. This de- 
sire was realized one day last summer when 
he launched an independent concern to produce 
and distribute as a means of recouping an 
enormous fortune which he had lost in New 
York real estate during the depression. In 
1928, Mr. Lefcourt's realty holdings were esti- 
mated to be worth $100,000,000. His building 
program in that year represented an investment 
of $50,000,000. He built 20 skyscrapers in or 
near the film sector of Times Square. Mr. 
Lefcourt's will, filed for probate last week, 
disclosed an estate worth $2,500. 

V 

The total number of steadv radio listeners 
in the United States is 61,200,000. 



Once he makes up his mind, Persia's sharp- 
nosed "King of Kings," Reza Shah Pahlevi, is 
a tiger for action, although theatre owners do 
not always enthuse over his decisions. Last 
week he sprang on Anglo-Persian Oil, stock 
control of which is held by the Government 
of Britain's King George V, no tiger. In Te- 
heran, with Raza Shah presiding, the Persian 
Cabinet denounced and cancelled Anglo-Per- 
sian's concession to exploit 500,000 square miles 
of Persian oil land which was to have run 
until 1961 

"Rejoice!" exhorted a special edition of Te- 
heran's evening Ettelaat. "The last foothold 
of foreigners has been removed ! Indeed, in- 
deed, this is a time for the greatest national 
rejoicing!" 

Organized rejoicing, which promptly began, 
was quenched by a snowstorm — but not for 
long. By command of the King of Kings, pic- 
ture theatres all over Persia were thrown open 
to the public free. Time reported the incident 
the other day. 

V 

When 10,000 high school students are per- 
mitted to see selected pictures as a part of 
their course of study they need a substan- 
tial, not to say ponderous, organization to 
speed and steer their halting footsteps. 
This is now being provided by the newly 
created Steering Committee of the Commit- 
tee on Photoplay Appreciation of the Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of English in 
America. 

V 

One of the strangest of all Oriental tor- 
ture devices, the "bell torture," is shown in 
Metro's new picture, "Mask of Fu Manchu." 
In operation, the victim is bound upright under 
a great bell, the crashing and unceasing notes 
of which eventualh drive him mad. 

V 

Wilfred F. Funk, poet and publisher, says 
the ten most beautiful words in the language 
are dawn, hush, lullaby, murmuring, tranquil, 
mist, luminous, chimes, golden and melody. Has 
he ever spent a December day in a picture 
company's home office and heard a press agent 
mention colossal, stupendous, gigantic, enormous, 
spectacular, terrific, magnificent, titanic, im- 
mense and superb? 

Or has he ever tried to sell film to an ex- 
hibitor and heard the one word "Yes?" 

Russell Birdwell, publicity writer at Radio's 
studio in Hollywood, independently filmed 
"Main Stem," which is supposed to have cost 
only $508 and a Saturday off. Mr. Birdwell 
once made "Street Corners" with a little 
money. It netted $6,000. The cost sheet of his 
latest experiment shows an expenditure of 30 
cents to the telephone company for the rent 
of an instrument used as a prop and $4.20 for 
a turkey luhich he gave to a woman running a 
lunchroom used in the film zvhich paid her for 
opening early so he ccndd shoot both the es- 
tablishment and the bird. Reports coming from 
Hollyivood indicate that the new picture was 
generally acclaimed at a preview the other 
dav- 

V 

The management of RKO theatres is still 
talking about the big economy job ahead. 
Every week the men in the field hear about 
it from executives in the home office. One 
of the choicest messages, addressed to man- 
agers of de luxe operations, comes from 
Herschel Stuart, who says: 

"Take that de luxe theatre of yours. You 
have coddled her, babied and spoiled her. She 
is snooty and gaudy and a prostitute. You 
have sweated and slaved to pay for her keep 
. . . You have kept her in luxury, in Park 
Avenue splendor, and often said: 'I cjm't cut 
this and can't cut that . . . ' WHY NOT ? 
You can and we must strip her of her fine 
feathers and place her on army rations. . . ." 



28 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 



Majestic Meets 
On New Budget 

Territorial franchise holders and execu- 
tives of Majestic Pictures will meet in New 
York Thursday to decide upon increased 
negative costs on the remaining 14 features 
of the 1932-33 schedule. Five pictures of 
the 20 scheduled are already completed and 
one other is in production. 

Herman Gluckman, president, will pre- 
side at the meeting which will be attended 
by William D. Shapiro, vice-president, of 
Boston; B. N. Judell, second vice-presi- 
dent; Phil Goldstone, treasurer, in charge 
of production; Eddie Eschmann, distribu- 
tion executive at the home office, and the 
following franchise holders: Anthony Luc- 
hese, Philadelphia and Washington; J. 
Simmonds, San Francisco and Los Angeles ; 
Morris Segal, Cincinnati and Cleveland; 
Jack Berkowitz, Buffalo ; Thomas A. Bran- 
on, Atlanta; H. H. Clemmons and J. Sil- 
verman, of Dallas and Oklahoma City; 
B. H. Mills, Albany; Nat Levine, Seattle, 
and Oscar Hanson, Toronto. 

Decision has already been made to in- 
crease costs of future pictures; the conven- 
tion will merely decide to what extent. 
Following the meeting, Mr. Gluckman, who 
also operates Capital Film Exchange in 
New York, will hold open house in his new 
offices on the tenth floor of the Film Center 
Building, at 630 9th Avenue. 

Majestic this week signed Paul Lukas and 
Leila Hyams for "Sing You Sinner," a play 
by Wilson Collison and adapted by Edward 
T. Lowe, which Frank Strayer will direct. 
Next on the company's production schedule 
will be "The Public Be Damned," co-fea- 
turing Edmund Lowe and Constance Cum- 
mings, with Irving Cummings directing. 

Herman Gluckman has purchased terri- 
torial rights to Nat Levine's single reeler, 
"Technocracy." Tony Luchese purchased 
the reel for Philadelphia and Joe Simmonds, 
for the coast. 

Urge Exhibitor Support 
For Independent Producers 

At a meeting in San Francisco of the In- 
dependent Theatre Owners of Northern 
California, a resolution was passed urging 
independent exhibitors to support indepen- 
dent producers. About 65 exhibitors, rep- 
resenting 75 theatres, are members of this 
organization. 

A review committee of five exhibitors was 
organized to preview releases of indepen- 
dent producers. A report will then be sent 
to independent theatres in northern Cali- 
fornia. 

Selznick Will Continue 
As Radio Production Head 

David O. Selznick will remain in charge 
of production for Radio, it was announced 
late Wednesday in Hollywood by B. B. 
Kahane, president, who went to the Coast to 
confer with Mr. Selznick on contract re- 
newal. Radio will not shift to a unit policy 
of production. 

Van Every Succeeds Schayer 

Dale Van Every succeeded Richard 
Schayer as editor at Universal City on 
Tuesday. 



CHINESE ENJOYING 
FOREIGN "TALKERS" 

The total of theatres and conse- 
quent total of seating capacity in the 
motion picture houses of China has 
more than doubled within the past 
five years, according to a recent news 
dispatch from Peiping, China. One 
leading American exchange is re- 
ported to have indicated that of the 
34 countries in which it operates, the 
greatest increase in business was in 
China during a five months' period. 
In 1927, following 20 years of motion 
pictures in China, 106 theatres had 
a seating capacity of 68,000. The 
last census shows an increase to 233 
houses and a combined seating total 
of 137,000. The ratio of seats to the 
total Chinese population is pointed 
out as still very low, but an indica- 
tion for the future is noted. Amer- 
icans and Europeans in Chinese cities 
are reported amazed at the manner 
in which the native Chinese, know- 
ing only their own language, attend 
and apparently enjoy the films in 
English or German. American films 
still remain the most popular. In 
Shanghai several studios are currently 
producing talking pictures in the 
native Chinese. These are said to be 
very well received. 



Motion Picture Society 
Fornned in Bombay, India 

The Motion Picture Society of India has 
been organized at Bombay for the purpose 
of "promoting a more scientific interest in 
the entire technique of motion pictures, 
both silent and talking." The science, it is 
noted, has not yet received any great atten- 
tion in India. A constitution has been drawn 
up and officers elected. 

H. K. Vakil, dramatic critic of the Bom- 
bay Chronicle, has been named president. 
Other officers are : vice-presidents, A. Zazalb- 
hoy, managing director Bombay Radio Com- 
pany, Ltd., and M. B. Pater, owner, Shri- 
Krishna Film Company ; treasurer, Dr. S. 
R. Mulgaockar ; secretary, K. S. Hirlekar, 
technical adviser, Agfa Photo Company, 
Bombay. Members of the executive com- 
mittee, in addition to the officers, are: Jam- 
nadas Subedar, Ranjit Film Company; C. 
H. Webber, Kodak, Ltd., Bombay; C. M. 
Luhar, Mehta-Luhar Productions, Bombay ; 
S. R. Kantebet, Indian Radio and Cable 
Communications, Ltd., Bombay; A. T. 
Johnson, Western Electric Company, Bom- 
bay. The technical committee includes Mr. 
Kantebet, S. J. Khambata, St. Xavier's Col- 
lege, Bombay; Mr. Subedar, Mr. Luhar, 
Professor G. R. Paranjpye, Royal Institute 
of Science. 



Movietone Denied Tariff Cut 

The United States Tariff Commission at 
Washington has dismissed an application 
of Fox Movietone News, Inc., filed last 
August, seeking an investigation under the 
flexible provisions of the tariff act of the 
rate of duty on negative and positive news- 
reel film, with a view to seelcing a reduc- 
tion. 



IVestern Electric 
Sues Ultraphone 

Western Electric has brought suit for 
patent infringement against Ultraphone 
Sound System, of Minneapolis. Named as 
co-defendant is the Twin City Theatre Cor- 
poration, owning the Princess theatre, Min- 
neapolis, which has an Ultraphone installa- 
tion. The action was filed in the United 
States district court, district of Minnesota. 

The suit is based upon the Lowenstein 
Patent, No. 1,231,764, covering negative 
grid bias amplification to prevent distortion. 
This patent was declared valid and infringed 
in a recent decision of the court of appeals 
for the second circuit in an action brought 
by Western Electric abainst Sol Waller- 
stein of the Broadway theatre, Buffalo, 
using Pacent equipment, according to the 
company. This suit was defended by War- 
ner Brothers. 

J. W. Davis Among Receivers 
Named for New York Local 306 

John W. Davis, Democratic presidential 
candidate in 1924; Hugh Frayne, New York 
State president of the American Federation 
of Labor, and James J. Dooling, a New 
York lawyer, have been named receivers by 
Supreme Court Justice Cotillo for Local 306 
of the International Alliance of Theatrical 
Stage Employees and M. P. Operators, New 
York union. 

They will act as receivers pending the 
determination of the suit brought several 
months ago by four members of Local 306 
against Samuel Kaplan, president. Shortly 
after the trial started, Mr. Kaplan and other 
officers of the local were ordered out of 
office by William C. Elliott, president of the 
lATSE. In the meantime the trial of Mr. 
Kaplan and other officers on indictments 
charging conspiracy and coercion has been 
adjourned to January 26 when it will be re- 
sumed in general sessions court in New 
York. 

Rubenstein Joins Supreme 
Screen Service; Heads Sales 

Leon J. Rubenstein, some years ago vice- 
president and recognized as one of the 
founders of National Screen Service, has 
joined Supreme Screen Service, New York 
trailer company. Mr. Rubenstein will su- 
pervise the national selling campaign of Su- 
preme, an agreement also giving him pos- 
session of a share of the company's stock. 

"The cardinal sin of the trailer," said Mr. 
Rubenstein, "is monotony. The trailer has 
not changed throughout the years. Those 
responsible for it, and who have taken 
profits from it, have failed to inject that 
entertainment value which it was originally 
designed to have." 



RKO Theatre Manager Dead 

Robert Hawkins, manager of the RKO 
Keith theatre in Flushing, N. Y., for the 
past year, died at a New York hospital last 
week following an operation. Mr. Hawkins 
was 42, and is survived by his widow and 
several brothers and sisters. 



Connolly Quits Fox 

Myles Connolly this week resigned as 
Fox supervisor at Movietone City. 





THE FACTS! 

BOX-OFFICE 

CHAMPIONS 

out of 15 for LEO ! 

The votes for the year are counted! Hundreds of 
leading theatres were canvassed week by week in 
M, P. Herald's Box-Office Championship poll And 
here's how the various companies shaped up for 
the year 1931-32: 



M-G-M 

Next company 



3 
2 
2 
1 
1 



Six for M-G-M out of 15 



M'G'M^s New Year's Party continues on next page 



30 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 




In the above chart, based on the Motion Picture Herald's listing of box office 
grosses, the vertical black bars represent the total business done in the 12 cities 
indicated during the seven-week period from November 5 to December 17 in 
1932. The shaded bars represent the business done In the same cities during the 
corresponding period in 1931. 



PLAN NEW SYSTEM FOR 
SELLING TALKER RIGHTS 



New Policy Being Considered 
Would Alter Payment Basis to 
Film "Arbiter" Who Handles 

: Sales of Stage Productions 

A new plan is understood to be under 
consideration which would alter the basis of 
payment to the so-called motion picture 
"arbiter," who, through a tieup with the 
Dramatists' Guild, negotiates the sale of 
motion picture rights to Broadway stage 
productions. A change in the rate to be 
paid the arbiter is included in the new 
plan. Screen rights to plays are said to cost 
the industry about $1,000,000 yearly. 

Joseph P. Bickerton, Jr., an attorney who 
has also been a producer, has been the 
arbiter for the past six years. According to 
the original agreement he has been entitled 
to per cent of the sums paid by picture 
producers for the rights to Broadway plays. 
Fees other than those provided in this agree- 
ment have not been mentioned, although it is 
understood that the Dramatists' Guild has 
specified that any surplus should be disposed 
of by a two-thirds vote of that organization. 

The proposed plan follows a request of 
Herman Shumlin, New York theatrical pro- 
ducer, for a report of the plays sold to film 
companies through Mr. Bickerton and finan- 
cial returns derived therefrom. The request 
was refused by Mr. Bickerton who did, 
however, turn in the report to the counsel 
for the Guild. That group in turn referred 
the matter to the committee, consisting of 
Warren Monsell and Brock Pemberton, who 
had represented the managers in drawing 
up the current basic agreement. 

Dr. Henry Mnckowitz, director of the 



New York Theatre League which includes 
most of the leading producing managers, has 
been asked by this committee to call a meet- 
ing of the League. It is understood that 
some action will be taken within a week, 
after which the League can then meet with 
the Dramatists' Guild and take final steps 
in revising the arbiter's payment plan. 

The estimate made by Mr. Bickerton of 
sales for the past four vears shows a total 
of $4,000,000, which would place his income 
at $25,000 annually. 

In discussing the situation, Mr. Pember- 
ton pointed out that there have been a num- 
ber of complaints regarding the work and 
income of the arbiter. The office was orig- 
inally established to act as a safeguard for 
authors, but, Mr. Pemberton said, the arbi- 
ter did not participate in all sales. More- 
over, Mr. Bickerton has recently re-entered 
the theatrical producing field, which is in 
violation of the original agreement. 

Although Mr. Pernberton did not know of 
any specific proposals that had been made, 
he thought it likely that the percentage of 
sale price would be lowered and a maximum 
sum to be earned in any year established. 



George Kann Leaves MGM 

Georg-e Kann, representative of the 
foreign department at the MGM Coast 
studio, resigned last week. No successor 
has been appointed as yet. The future plans 
of Mr. Kann are indefinite. 



MPPDA Board Meets 

The regular quarterly board of directors 
meeting of the Motion Picture Producers 
and Distributors of America, Inc., was held 
in New York last Fridav. 



Film Society Is 
Formed to Study 
Unusual Pictures 

The Film Society, Inc., an organization 
for the exhibition of motion pictures which 
cannot be shown commercially because of 
lack of box office appeal or because of cen- 
sorship, to a private membership, has been 
formed in New York. Distinguished names 
are included in the published list of spon- 
sors. 

It is planned to offer 10 Sunday evening 
performances throughout the year, with the 
exception of July and August. The mem- 
bership will be limited to 500, each person 
being required to pay dues of $12 per year. 
The organization will not be conducted for 
profit, according to Julien Levy, president. 
The directors include Iris Barry, James 
Shelley Hamilton, Henry Hart, Lincoln 
Kirstein, Mr. Levy, Dwight MacDonald, 
Harry Alan Potamkin, Critchell Rimington, 
R. De Roussy De Sales, Irvin Shapiro, 
Louis Simon, John A. Thomas. Morris L. 
Ernst is counsel. Offices are at 602 Madi- 
son avenue. 

In the course of the announcement Mr. 
Levy said : "There are many films of both 
foreign and domestic origin which never 
even reach the little playhouses because 
they appeal, in their subject matter or tech- 
nique, to a limited audience, or because the 
censor forbids their exhibition. We believe 
there are 500 persons in New York so 
genuinely interested in the motion picture 
that they will pay $12 a year to support an 
organization which offers the opportunity 
to study selected programs of unusual 
films." 

Erpi Case Settlement Is 
Possible Warner Precedent 

The settlement out of court of a recent 
breach of contract action between Electrical 
Research Products, Inc., and the Capitol 
theatre, Springfield, N. H., is seen as point- 
ing a precedent possibly bearing on the liti- 
gation now pending in Wilmington, Del., 
between Warner and Erpi. 

The attorney for the defense in the New 
Hampshire action, involving a sound in- 
stallation, had raised in defense the prin- 
cipal claims made by the Stanley Corpora- 
tion of America, a wholly owner Warner 
subsidiary, at Wilmington. The attorney 
offered a settlement before Erpi witnesses 
took the stand. Erpi accepted on terms in- 
volving payment by the defense of accrued 
charges in full and a "substantial" amount 
of liquidated damages. 

Balaban Assumes Duties of 
Harry Katz in Chicago 

Theatres operated by Publix in Indiana 
and Illinois, including the Great States cir- 
cuit, are now being supervised by John 
Balaban, from Chicago, as the result of the 
recent resignation of Harry Katz, who was 
director of the division. 

Alex Halperin, division booker of the 
Illinois-Indiana theatres, has also resigned. 
With the addition of these theatres, the 
Balaban & Katz circuit becomes the largest 
unit in the decentralized Publix organiza- 
tion. 






THEY OUGHT TO MAKE 
THIS PRIZE STATUE 

INTO A LION! 

Every year Leaping Leo of M-Q-M 
cops the industry's highest honors I 

HERE'S THE 1931-1932 M-G-M LANDSLIDE! 

BEST ACTRESS: 

Helen Hayes (And now watch her in "Son-Daughter") 

BEST PICTURE: 

"Grand Hotel" {It'll be "Rasputin & The Empress" in 1933) 
BEST STORY: 

Frances Marion {"The Champ") ^^^^"^ 
BEST SHORT: (M^.I^^'moRE 

Laurel-Hardy in Hal Roach's "Music Bo\ljM*^Y^''f^^^^ 

EXTRA AWARD: ''-^L^ Q Fun on next 

Wallace Beery in "The Champ" 



32 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, I 932 



TRAVELERS... 



FINANCIAL REVISIONS 
OF RKO ARE OUTLINED 



Further Revisions Indicated in 
Balance Sheet of Sept. 30 
After Exchange Approval of 
Additional Listing of Stock 

Radio-Keith-Orpheum Corp. last week 
disclosed further revisions of its financial 
structure. These are outlined in the Sep- 
tember 30 balance sheet which was made 
available after the New York Stock Ex- 
change had approved the listing of 100,000 
additional common shares which are to be 
issued to Rockefeller Center, Inc., in con- 
sideration of a substantial reduction in the 
amount of space in Radio City originally 
contracted for by RKO. Radio Corpora- 
tion of America, which controls RKO, is 
issuing a similar block of stock to the Rocke- 
feller interests, making the latter one of 
the large stockholders both of RKO and 
RCA. 

Reduction in space required by RKO and 
Radio became necessary owing to the con- 
sent decree obtained by the Department of 
Justice last month stipulating the severence 
of General Electric and Westinghouse from 
Radio and RKO. With the additional list- 
ing, RKO will have outstanding 2,571,355^ 
shares, including 16,437 shares held in the 
company's treasury. 

The September 30, 1932, balance sheet of 
RKO gives effect to the revision as of Janu- 
ary 1, 1932, of book values of certain as- 
sets of the corporation and its subsidiaries, 
the changes being subsequent to the recap- 
italization of the company and the under- 
writing of a new debenture issue by the 
Radio Corporation. 

RKO's table of depression and amortiza- 
tion shows that the corporation annually 
writes off depreciation of buildings at the 
rate of from 2 to 5 per cent ; sound equip- 
ment, at 20 per cent per year ; furniture, 
equipment and furnishings, from 10 to 
33 1/3 per cent ; organs 5 per cent ; auto- 
mobiles, 33 1/3 per cent, and trucks, at 25 
per cent. The book values of leaseholds 
and leased properties are being amortized 
over the terms of the leases or over the esti- 
mated life of the properties — whichever is 
the shorter. 

Feature negatives are amortized 98 per 
cent in about 16 months, and 100 per cent 
by the 20th month. They are amortized 52 
per cent within the third month. Feature 
positives reach complete amortization at the 
13th month, 98 per cent by the 10th, and 
65^2 within the third. 

The September 30 balance sheets shows 
current assets of $17,590,676, compared 
with $26,878,694 on December 31, 1931, 
against current liabilities of $8,722,554 
compared with $9,527,875 on December 31, 
1931. Capital assets have been written down 
to $17,590,676 from $26,878,694 on Decem- 
ber 31, 1931. Buildings and equipment, 
under this heading, have been written down 
to $25,419,847 from $36,242,868 and im- 
provements and equipment on leased prop- 
erty have been written down to $14,160,290 
from $21,990,961. 

Among the current assets it is shown that 
unpaid subscriptions on debentures and 
stock amount to $3,854,231, compared with 
$10,674,170 at the close of 1931. Notes re- 



ceivable increased to $207,319 from $87,655 
and accounts receivable to $1,165,133 from 
$1,120,827. 

Changes in investments and advances to 
affiliated and other companies show equities 
in capital stocks of affiliated and other com- 
panies unchanged at $1,073,523, based on 
appraisal. Unappraised capital stocks were 
reduced on the books to $1,060,732 from 
$1,307,651 and an item of $695,544, repre- 
senting equity in investments and advances 
to wholly owned foreign subsidiary com- 
panies not consolidated, was eliminated en- 
tirely. Advances to affiliated companies 
were increased to $1,740,706 from $735,443. 

Deferred charges, many to be disposed of 
before the end of 1932, totaled $4,979,289, 
compared with $3,662,625 at the end of 
1931. 

Among the liabilities a special reserve of 
$7,382,952 has been set up for the revalua- 
tion of capital assets, bringing total reserves 
to $11,086,356, compared with $4,351,926 at 
the end of 1931. The company has funded 
debt of $3,310,833 maturing before Septem- 
ber 30, 1933, out of total funded debt of 
$38,491,784. 

The new common stock of the company 
has been revalued on the books at $24,557,- 
457, compared with $48,587,713 at the end 
of 1931. After deducting net loss of $4,964,- 
331 incurred for the nine months ended 
September 30 the capital account, includ- 
ing capital surplus of $2,899,792, stood at 
$21,403,784, compared with $132,294,935 at 
the end of 1931. 

After giving effect to the nine months' 
net loss the capital surplus of the company 
was completely wiped out, leaving net deficit 
of $6,053,465 deducted from the company's 
capital. 

The detailed profit and loss statement of 
the company shows heavy economies made 
in salaries, the total being $17,579,547 for 
the nine months ended September 30, com- 
pared with $29,394,016 for the full year 
1931. Operating and general expenses were 
$12,424,157 for the nine months, compared 
with $19,486,853 for all of 1931. Total ex- 
penses of $47,577,408 compare with $76,- 
983,140 for all of 1931, and exceeded gross 
income of $46,830,645 by $746,762. Gross 
income for the nine months was $46,830,645, 
compared with $79,232,392 for all of 1931. 

Wanger Leaving Columbia; 
May Join Radio Pictures 

Walter Wanger, vice president of Colum- 
bia, will sever his connection with that com- 
pany on January 16, according to Harry 
Cohn, president. Active in Columbia pro- 
duction for the past seven months, Mr. 
Wanger was previously general manager of 
production for Paramount. 

Hollywood reports indicate Mr. Wanger 
may join Radio as an associate producer, 
perhaps under the unit system thought 
likely at that plant. Richard Schayer will 
leave Universal in January, three months 
before expiration of his contract, to join 
Columbia as associate producer and head of 
the scenario department, succeeding Mr. 
Wanger. Howard Estabrook may join Uni- 
versal in place of Mr. Schayer, who was 
scenario head. 



Leo Carrillo, player, arrived in New York 
from Hollywood. 

Colin Clive arrived in New York from Lon- 
don, en route to Radio studio in Hollywood. 

Alan Livingston will arrive in Movietone 
City from Canada next week to join Fox. 

William K. Howard, Fox director, arrived 
in New York from Europe, en route to 
Coast. 

Nate Blumberg, midwest manager; Ben 

Berkowitz, publicist, arrived at RKO's New 

York office from Chicago. 
George R. Batcheller returned to New York 

from Chicago. 
Harry Thomas, president of First Division, 

returned to New York from sales- trip. 
Pat O'Brien, player, returned to Hollywood 

from New York. 
Karl MacDonald, Latin America manager 

for Warners, returned to New York from 

South America. 
Cecil B. De Mille left New York for road 

tour with "Sign of the Cross." 
Herman Greenwood, General Electric, sailed 

for Europe. 
Guy Bolton, musical composer, left New York 

for Europe. 

Jascha Heifetz, violinist, sailed from New 
York for Europe. 

Phil Goldstone, producer, arrived in New 
York from the Coast. 

Hal Horne, United Artists' advertising di- 
rector, will return to New York from Holly- 
wood next week. 

Miriam Hopkins arrived in Hollywood from 
New York. 

Charles Rosenzweig, Columbia sales execu- 
tive, will return soon to New York from 
Hollywood. 

A. Kompel, Irving Pictures, left New York 
for Hollywood. 

Lloyd Hughes;, player, arrived in New York. 

J. H. Seidelman, Paramount foreign execu- 
tive, left New York for Europe. 

Frank Mastroly, Carl Laemmle's representa- 
tive, left New York for Universal City. 

Sam Sax, Vitaphone executive, left New York 
for Bermuda. 

WiLLARD S. McKay, Universal legal director, 
returned to New York from Universal City. 

Sam E. Morris, in charge of foreign distribu- 
tion at Warners, will soon sail for Europe. 

Jules Levy has arrived in New York. 

Arthur Loew returned to New York from 
Europe. 

Philip Merrivale, player, arrived in Holly- 
wood from New York to start work for Fox. 

Helen Twelvetrees, player, accompanied by 
her husband, Frank Woody, arrived in Hol- 
lywood from New York. 

John R. Frueler, president of Freuler Film 
Associates, Inc., was due in Hollywood from 
New York. 

Charles L. Glett, vice president of Freuler 
Film Associates, Inc., will visit distributing 
centres of Excellent Film Exchange at Mon- 
treal, Toronto and St. John. 

Academy Gains 159 Members 
Since July; Total Is Now 876 

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and 
Sciences on the Coast reports membership, 
as of December 15, 1932, of 876 members, 
consisting of 578 in the Academy class and 
298 in the Associate class. The total of 
876 represents an increase of 159 since July 
15, 1932. 

Of the 159 added since July, 106 were in 
the Academy class and 52 in the Associate 
class. Taken by branches, the report di- 
vides the increase as follows: actors, 43; 
directors and assistants, 14; producers, 26; 
technicians, 40; writers, 31; special, five. 



ANOTHER 



BLINDFOLD 
TEST! 





"Guess which company will lead all 
others in the annual TEN BEST 

PICTURES OF THE YEAR 

conducted by Film Daily? 

Soon comes the time when hundreds of newspaper 
critics in every city of America cast their votes for 
the past year's TEN BEST PICTURES! 

Will M'G'M top the list again as it has so 
many times before? We think so! Don't you? 



(M-Q-M's New Year's party 



34 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 



Ai E E T I N e S 




A calendar of events and meeting dates of exhibitor and production 
associations and other non-commercial organizations in the industry. 



EAST 

DECEMBER 

29 — Associafed Motion Picture Advertisers: Week- 
ly luncheon and forum, at Sardi's, West 
44th Street, New York. President. Hal 
Home; Secretary, Al Sherman. 

MPTO of Eastern Pa., Southern N. J., and 
Del.: Weekly meeting of board of direc- 
tors, at Philadelphia. 
31 — New York Motion Picture Club: New Year's 
Eve Celebration, at 1560 Broadway, New 
York. President, Lee A. Ochs; Secretary, 
Paul Guiick. 

JANUARY 

2 — Associated Assistant Directors of New York: 

Executive board meeting, at Room 506, 
251 West 42nd Street, New York. Presi- 
dent, Joseph Nadel; Secretary, Walter 
Sheridan. 

3 — New York Motion Picture Club: Weekly forum 

and luncheon, at 1560 Broadway, New 
York. President, Lee A. Ochs: Secretary, 
Paul Guiick; Manager, George Morris. 
Allied Theatres of Michigan: Directors' meet- 
ing, at 607 Fox Building, Detroit. President, 
Glenn A. Cross; Secretary, John E. Niebes. 

4 — Allied Theatres of Illinois: Directors' meeting, 

at Room 411, 910 South Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago. President, Aaron Saperstein; Sec- 
retary, Harry Lasker. 

5 — Allied States Association: Special meeting, 

board of directors, at Washington. Presi- 
dent, W. A. Steffes. 

Associated Motion Picture Advertisers of New 
York: Weekly luncheon and forum, at 
Sardi's, West 44th Street, New York. Presi- 
dent, Hal Home; Secretary, Al Sherman. 

Allied Theatres of Illinois: General meeting, 
at Congress Hotel, Chicago. President, 
Aaron Saperstein; Secretary, Harry Lasker. 

MPTO of Eestern Pa., So. N. J. and Del.: 
Weekly meeting, at Philadelphia. 

6— MPTO of Western Pennsylvania: Monthly 

directors' meeting, at 425 Van Braam Street, 
Pittsburgh. President, William R. Wheat, 
Jr.; Secretary, Fred J. Herrington. 

10 — New York Motion Picture Club: Weekly 

luncheon and forum, at 1560 Broadway, 
New York. President, Lee A. Ochs; Secre- 
tary, Paul Guiick; Manager, George Morris. 
Allied Theatre Owners of New Jersey: Regu- 
lar meeting, Hotel Lincoln, New York. 
Headquarters, 303 West 42nd Street, New 
York. President, Sidney E. Samuelson. 

11 — Allied Theatres of Illinois: Directors' meeting, 

at Room 411, 910 South Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago. President, Aaron Saperstein; 
Secretary, Harry Lasker. 

12 — Associated Motion Picture Advertisers of 

New York: Weekly luncheon and forum, 
at Sardi's, West 44th Street, New York. 
President, Hal Home; Secretary, Al 
Sherman. 

MPTO of Eastern Pa.. So. N. J. and Del.: 

Weekly meeting, at Philadelphia. 
16mm. Motion Picture Board of Trade: Regu- 
lar luncheon and meeting, at Hotel Victoria, 
51st Street and 7th Avenue, New York. 
President, G. P. Foute; Secretary, A. D. V. 
Storey. 

1 6— Associated Assistant Directors of New York: 

Regular meeting and executive committee 
meeting, at Room 506, 251 West 42nd 
Street, New York. President, Joseph Nadel: 
Secretary, Walter Sheridan. 



17 — New York Motion Picture Club: Weekly forum 

and luncheon, at 1560 Broadway, New 
York. President, Lee A. Ochs; Secretary, 
Paul Guiick; Manager, George Morris. 
Allied Theatres of Michigan: Directors' meet- 
ing, at 607 Fox Building, Detroit. Presi- 
dent, Glenn A. Cross; Secretary, John E. 
Niebes. 

18 — Allied Theatres of Illinois: Directors' meeting, 

at Room 411, 910 South Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago. President, Aaron Saperstein; 
Secretary, Harry Lasker. 

19 — Associated Motion Picture Advertisers of New 

York: Weekly luncheon and forum, at 
Sardi's, West 44th Street, New York. Presi- 
dent, Hal Home; Secretary, Al Sherman. 

MPTO of Eastern Pa.. So. N. J. and Del.: 

Weekly meeting, at Philadelphia. 
The Lambs Club: Monthly meeting of the 
Council, at 130 West 44th Street, New 
York. 

WEST 

JANUARY 

2 — International Alliance of Theatre Stage Em- 

ployees, Studio Branch: Monthly meeting, 
at 6472 Santa Monica Boulevard, Holly- 
wood. Business Representative, Lew C. G. 
Blix. 

Motion Picture Make-Up Artists Association: 

Weekly meeting, at 1666 North Highland 
Avenue, Hollywood. President, Perc West- 
more; Secretary, Jack Lloyd. 
Assistant Directors Association: Semi-monthly 
meeting, at 1605 Cahuenga Boulevard, 
Hollywood. Richard L'Estrange, executive 
in charge. 

3 — Federated Motion Picture Studio Crafts: 

Weekly meeting, at 2560 North Beachwood 
Drive, Hollywood. President, Harry W. 
Scott; Secretary, Richard L'Estrange. 

Troupers, Inc.: Semi-monthly meeting, at 1642 
El Centro Avenue, Hollywood. President, 
Joseph DeGrasse; Secretary, Adabelle 
Driver. 

Assistance League: Board of directors' weekly 
meeting, at 5604 DeLongpre Avenue, Holly- 
wood. Managing Director, Mrs. Lee Wray 
Turner. 

International Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers, Studio Branch: Weekly meetina, 
at 5402 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood. 
President, H. D. Matrin; Secretary, A. P. 
Speede. 

Motion Picture Relief Fund: Monthly meeting, 
at 5481 Santa Monica Boulevard. Man- 
aging Director, Mrs. Abraham Lehr. 

4 — The Wampas: Weekly meeting, at 6700 Sunset 

Bouelvard, Hollywood. President, Frank 
Whitbeck; Secretary, Carlisle Jones. 

The Breakfast Club: Weekly meeting, at 3213 
Riverside Drive, Los Angeles. President, 
Carl Laemmie; Manager, Harold B. Link. 

233 Club: Semi-monthly meeting, at 6735 
Yucca Street, Hollywood. President, John 
LeRoy Johnston; Secretary, Abraham S. 
Goldman. 

Brotherhood of Studio Carpenetrs, Local 946: 

Weekly meeting, at 6474 Santa Monica 
Boulevard, Hollywood. Business Represen- 
tative, J. F. Kearns; Secretary, W. E. Sparks. 

5 — Independent Motion Picture Producers Asso- 

ciation: Monthly meeting, at 6001 Santa 
Monica Boulevard, Hollywood. President, 
M. H. Hoffman; Secretary, Nat Levlne. 



International Photographers of the M. P. In- 
dustry. Local 659: Regular quarterly meet- 
ing, at 1605 North Cahuenga Avenue, Los 
Angeles. Business Representative, Howard 
Hurd. 

9 — Motion Picture Make-Up Artists Association: 

Weekly meeting, at 1666 North Highland 
Avenue, Hollywood. President, Perc West- 
more; Secretary, Jack Lloyd. 

The Masquers Club: Semi-monthly meeting, at 
1765 North Sycamore Avenue, Hollywood. 
Harlequin, Antonio Moreno.. 
10 — Federated Motion Picture Studio Crafts: 

Weekly meeting, at 2560 North Beachwood 
Drive, Hollywood. President, Harry W. 
Scott; Secretary, Richard L'Estrange. 

Allied Theatre Owners of California: Semi- 
monthly meeting, at 1584 West Washington 
Boulevard, Los Angeles. President, G. A. 
Metzger. 

Assistance League: Executive committee 
monthly meeting, also board of directors' 
weekly meeting, at 5604 DeLongpre Avenue, 
Hollywood. Managing Director, Mrs. Lee 
Wray Turner. 

International Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers, Studio Branch: Weekly meeting, 
at 5402 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood. 
President, H. D. Martin; Secretary, A. P. 
Speede. 

Motion Picture Operators' Union, Coast 
Branch: Monthly meeting, at 1489 West 
Washington Boulevard. 
I I — The Wampas: Weekly meeting, at 6700 Sunset 
Boulevard, Hollywood. President, Frank 
Whitbeck; Secretary, Carlisle Jones. 

The Breakfast Club: Weekly meeting, at 3213 
Riverside Drive, Los Angeles. President, 
Carl Laemmie; Manager, Harold B. Link. 

Brotherhood of Studio Carpenters. Local 946: 
Weekly meeting, at 6474 Santa Monica 
Boulevard, Hollywood. Business Represen- 
tative, J. F. Kearns; Secretary, W. E. Sparks. 

13 — International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees. Coast Branch: Directors' semi- 
monthly meeting, at 6472 Santa Monica 
Boulevard, Hollywood. Business Represen- 
tative, Lew C. G. Bllx. 

15 — Troupers. Inc.: Semi-monthly meeting, at 1642 

El Centro Avenue, Hollywood. President, 
Joseph DeGrasse; Secretary, Adabelle 
Driver. 

16— Motion Picture Make-Up Artists Association: 

Weekly meeting, at 1666 North Highland 
Avenue, Hollywood. President, Perc West- 
more; Secretary, Jack Lloyd. 

Assistant Directors Association: Semi-monthly 
meeting, at 1605 Cahuenga Boulevard, 
Hollywood. Executive In charge, Richard 
L'Estrange. 

17 — Federated Motion Picture Studio Crafts: 

Weekly meeting, at 2560 North Beachwood 
Drive, Hollywood. President, Harry W. 
Scott; Secretary, Richard L'Estrange. 

Assistance League: Board of directors' weekly 
meeting, at 5604 DeLongpre Avenue, Holly- 
wood. Managing Director, Mrs. Lee Wray 
Turner. 

International Brothershood of Electrical 
Workers, Studio Branch: ' Weekly meeting, 
at 5402 Hollywood Boulevard. President, 
H. D. Martin; Secretary, A. P. Speede. 

18 — 233 Club: Semi-monthly meeting, at 6735 

Yucca Street, Hollywood.. President, John 
LeRoy Johnston; Secretary, Abraham S. 
Goldman. 



BARRYMORES PLEASE NOTE! 

^^Rasputin and The Empress^^ at M-Q^M^s 
celebrated $2 Astor Theatre, New York. 

FRIDAY NIGHT. World Premiere. Riots at the Astor. 
The house could have been sold out ten times! 
SATURDAY. 4 shows to absolute capacity. 
SUNDAY. 3 shows with customers turned away, alas! 
MONDAY. 3 shows to S. R. O. 
TUESDAY. On regular twice-daily schedule a sell-out! 

{and so on, far into 1933/) 

(More M'G'M 
high jinks 
on next page) j;, 



36 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 



$HOWMEN*$ REVIEWS 



This deparfment deals wifh new product 
from the point of view of the exhibitor 
who is to purvey it to his own public 



III' 



"RASPUTIN AND 
THE EMPRESS" 



as seen by 

BENJAMIN DeCASSERES 

The Barrymore family will, in a hundred 
years, be a legend, or an historical fact 
iDoth glamorous and romantic. They are 
the Medici Family of the stage — Cather- 
ine-Ethel Medici-Barrymore, Lorenzo the 
Magnificent, alias John Barrymore, and 
Allesandro Lionel Medici-Barrymore. 

Metro-Soldwyn-Mayer had the grand 
idea of putting the three Barrymores into 
a play. They chose a subject that fits the 
three Barrymores like a slug of whisky fits 
the gullet of a drink-snooper. The story Is 
"Rasputin and the Empress," done by 
Charles MacArthur and splendidly directed 
and sumptuously conceived by Richard 
Boleslavsky. At its world-premiere at the 
New York Astor it was followed absorb- 
ingly by as brilliant and as famous an aud- 
ience as I have seen at an opening in 
many years. 

I can see nothing for "Rasputin and the 
Empress" but a hundred per cent box 
office attraction. Besides the tremendous 
pulling power of the names Lionel, Ethel 
and John (they could drop their last names 
entirely and still everybody would know 
who you are talking about), the scenarist 
and the director have put Into this ter- 
rific (but sometimes slow-moving) drama 
of the fall of a mighty empire every In- 
gredient that attracts and holds all classes 
of picture fans: romance, suspense, mur- 
der, battle, war-tensity, bitter humor, 
palatial sets, gaudy costuming and vivid 
characterizations. 

The story of the strange monk who 
cured the Czar's son by hypnotism when 
all medical aid had failed, his llfe-and- 
death grip on the Romanoffs, his decline, 
his murder and the catastrophe of 1914 
follows very closely the historical facts. 
There has been injected Into the story — 
and very plausibly — a Prince Chegodieff 
and his sweetheart, Princess Natasha. It 
is because Rasputin, feeling his power In- 
vincible, has assaulted Natasha that Prince 
Chegodieff falls upon this diabolical monk 
and in a terrific scene — one of the most 
effective ever seen on the screen — pounds 



Rasputin almost to death with an iron bar 
and throws his body into the Neva. 

As for the story, the only criticism I 
can make Is that it should be tightened up 
in the first few reels. There are scenes 
where I felt the audience fidget. 

The acting of the Barrymores was, in 
the main, superb, with the palm going to 
John Barrymore as the romantic Prince 
Chegodieff. I have always affirmed that 
John was the greatest of the Barrymores 
— when he wanted to be. Lately he has 
played a lot of monkeyshines. He seems, 
sometimes, to be spoofing himself, the role 
and the public. But in this picture he 
gives us the very best that is in him. Here 
are artistic sincerity, simplicity and direct- 
ness, with the irritating mannerisms en- 
tirely deleted. 

Ethel Barrymore looked superb and 
acted with dignity (every Inch a queen) 
as the Czarina. She is at her best when 
she Is awakened to the real character of 
Rasputin after the attack on Princess 
Natasha. A little less eye-rolling, however, 
would have aided her. 

Lionel Barrymore as Rasputin was pow- 
erful and compelling — In spots. He has, 
of course, got to wear whiskers, and that 
always is a cause of laughter (mental, at 
least). When he tries to be diabolical he 
Is least effective and more effective when 
he suggests evil than when he dishes It out. 

"Rasputin and the Empress" will, I be- 
lieve, be shown eventually in every picture- 
house In the country. It is a major event, 
both from an artistic and a box office 
point of view. 

Produced and distributed by Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer. Directed by Richard Boleslavsky. Author, 
Charles MacArthur. Musical score by Herbert 
Stothart. Photography by William Daniels. Film 
editor, Tom Held. Running, time, 127 minutes. 
CAST 

Prince Chegodieff John Barrymore 

The Czarina Ethel Barrymore 

Rasputin Lionel Barrymore 

The Czar Ralph Morgan 

Princess Natasha Diana Wynyard 

The Czarevitch Tad Alexander 

Grand Duke Igor C. Henry Gordon 

Doctor Remezov Edward Arnold 



The Billion Dollar Scandal 

(Paramount) 
Drama 

Almost forgotten headlines — the great oil 
scandals of a couple of presidential administra- 
tions ago — constitute the real background for 
this rather vivid story. Yet the story is so 
treated that a straight bid for human interest 
rather than a trite ethical political preachment 
seems to be its main objective. 

So presented that it is broken up into three 
acts, the story opens with two confidence men, 
Ratsy and Kid McGurn, being paroled, as 
Fingers, who expected to go out with them is 
held in jail. Drama is introduced in this se- 
quence as the disappointed Fingers plans to 
shoot his way out, only to have the warden, 
who is his friend, go to bat for him and get 
his parole. 

Second act is in New York and comedy is 
its highlight as the punch-drunk Kid is 
knocked out in a ludicrous bout and the slangy 
Fingers and the wise-cracking Ratsy begin to 
wonder how they are going to eat as their 
hoped-to-be meal ticket blows up. Close of this 
episode features an auto accident, which might 
return the three to the pen, yet serves to bring 
about a meeting between Fingers and Master- 
son, who, after Fingers fixes him up, hires 
him as his trainer. 

The job gives Fingers an opportunity of 
making "real people" out of his young brother, 
Babe. Opening the third act we find Fingers 
making a hit with Masterson and his "big 
shot" business and governmental associates. In 
on many tips. Fingers cashes in one the stock 
market and boosts his brother along, who in 
the meantime has fallen in love with Doris. 
Masterson, learning of the romance, decides to 
break it up and a fake stock tip ruins Fingers, 
who plans revenge. 

It comes as a newspaper publisher, Gris- 
wold, gets to him and then the sensational 
headline stories that result in a senatorial 
investigation and the repurcusions with which 
every adult is familiar. Into it are woven all 
the scandal, framing, murders, suicides and dou- 
ble-crossings as well as personalities that fea- 
tured those glaring stories. Fingers considers 
himself the "champeen of 120,000,000 peepul," 
but in the end, after all the drama, pathos 
and emotion-stirring incidents have run their 
course, he's just as dead as yesterday's hero, 
unable even to get a job from Griswold or any 
who have profited by his thrilling revelations.^ 

As may be noted, a picture based on this 
type of news story, is lacking in any great 
love-interest romance, consequently its appeal 
to women will have to be created by the right 
kind of a campaign. The same admonition 
will likewise apply to the general campaign. 
In this line, it would appear that any too great 
description of the story will hurt rather than 
help the box office draw. One of the conclud- 
ing lines in the picture is "nothing is as cold 
as yesterday's news," which should serve as 
a tip as to angles which should be ignored. 

Without revealing the plot, personalities 
should carry the brunt of the selling campaign 
and catchlines that feature the characters as 
they are should predominate. Following up 
the title, which is intriguing enough and about 
which it is possible to erect some curiosity- 



1933 is the year which will be 
famed for the glorious performance 

of HELEN HAYES in M-G-M's 

''SON-DAUGHTER'' . 




(Come on over to 
M-G'M's New Year's 
frolic on next page) 



38 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 



1932 



creating ideas, selling Fingers as a "jailbird" 
who went to bat and won for 120,000,000 plain 
people, building up his pals Ratsy and the Kid 
with plenty of side-walk human interest and 
painting Masterson, the big financeer-political 
racketeer and his associates as men who would 
loot the nation for their own gain, may be the 
peg upon which you can stir up interest. — 
McCarthy, Hollywood. 

Produced and distributed by Paramount. Directed 
by Harry Joe Brown. Story and screen play by 
Gene Towne and Graham Baker. Dialogue by Wil- 
lard Mack and Beatrice Banyard. Photography by 
Charles Stumar. Release date, January 6, 1933. 
Running time, 78 minutes. 

CAST 

■ Fingers Robert Armstrong 

Doris Masterson Constance Cummings 

Anna Olga Baclanova 

Masterson Frank Morgan 

Ratsy James Gleason 

Griswold Irving Pichel 

Kid McGurn Warren Hymer 

Babe Frank Albertson 

The Warden Berton Churchill 

Carter B. Moore Sidney Toler 

Parker Walter Walker 

Mr. Jackson Hale Hamilton 

Mrs. Jackson Dorothy Petersop 

Haddock Edmund Breese 

Anderson Ralf Harolde 



The Flag Lieutenant 

(British & Dominions) 
Comedy-Drama 

If precedent is to be trusted, "The Flag 
Lieutenant" was a good picture before it went 
into production, for the silent version had a 
great vogue several years ago. And it may 
just as well be said, here and now, that the 
new version carries forward the reputation of 
its silent forbear, and provides a solid slice of 
entertainment for the mass. The glamour of 
the navy makes a fine background for this 
romantic comedy-drama, and it should make 
an equally solid background for your exploita- 
tion campaign. True, the ways of the British 
navy are not altogether those of Uncle Sam, 
but the kinship of the services is such that your 
patrons will readily appreciate all the atmo- 
sphere of the sea you put into your efforts. 

But if there's capital to be made out of the 
marine element — and the naval sequences bear 
the stamp of authenticity — you also have a pull 
in selling the story on its "greater love hath 
no man" plot. It isn't exactly that, but it tells 
of how a certain Dicky Lascelles, putting the 
welfare of his best friend before his own, very 
much balls up his own chances, with the result 
that several hundred feet of good celluloid need 
to be used up before the tangle is unravelled 
and everything is set for him and his sweetie 
to make the middle aisle trip together. Plenty 
of rapid action characterizes the working out 
of the plot, and the long sequences showing 
bluejackets in action against the unleashed 
hordes of Mahound will hold your patrons 
firmly in their chairs. 

Surely, then, I don't have to tell you how 
to exploit a picture of this type; for your best 
bet is to play it up on conventional lines. The 
names of the players won't mean much to your 
customers, though they may, after seeing the 
piece, hanker after a return visit from Henry 
Edwards and Anna Neagle. For both are of 
the type that makes pleasant watching to the 
romantically minded (as if there were any film 
"fan" who is not!), and they are supported 
by players who fit neatly into their roles. Cus- 
tomers will find something to laugh at, some- 
thing to grip them and — most important — a 
little something to pipe their eye about. — 
Charman, London. 

Produced by British & Dominions at Elstree, Eng- 
land. Directed by Henry Eidwards. Story by Lt. 
Col. W. P. Drury and Major Leo Trevor. Adapted by 
Joan Wentworth Wood. Photography by Stanley 
Rodwell. Recording by J. S. Dennis. Film editing 
by Michael Hankinson. Naval technical advisor, Com- 
mander F. W. Gleed. Running time, 85 minutes. 
CAST 

Lt. Dicky Lascelles Henry Edwards 

Hermione Wynne Anna Neagle 

Admiral Sir Berkeley Wynne Louis Goodrich 

Major Thesiger Peter Gawthorne 

General Gough-Bogle O. B. Qarence 

Colonel McLeod Sam Livesay 

Lt. Palliser Michael Hogan 

Midshipman Lee Peter Northcote 

Midshipman Hood Tully Comber 

Mrs. Gough-Bogle Sybil Grove 

Mrs. Cameron Joyce Bland 



Parachute Jumper 

(Warner) 
Drama 

As a regular-run feature and for smaller town 
entertainment, particularly, this rather excit- 
ing romance drama, pepped up with a lot of 
circus airplane flying, is a reasonably active 
show. 

Throughout the entire story there is ample 
evidence of attempts to present a brand of 
entertainment that will have an appeal for both 
adults and children and to both sexes. Thus 
there is much gayety surrounding the gyrations 
of the two ex-Marine Corps aviators which 
lets them indulge in a little excitement with 
the native damsels in a little Nicaragua jungle 
cantina. Also there is romance, drama, spec- 
tacle, thrills, scores of laughs in the dialogue, 
a digression with a "kept woman," a lot of 
broad hints of gangster menace and finally a 
thrilling mid-air brush with the Border Patrol 
Air Fleet, some breath-taking crashes and an 
interesting search climax. Yet in inserting 
the love interest, several bits of dialogue and 
action have been included that might not set 
so well with those other than the most liberal 
minded. 

The picture covers a lot of territory from 
South America, with the sidewalks of New 
York as the first stopping point, where, in 
search of a job. Bill Keller meets Alabama, 
who is also looking for work. She goes to live 
in the same apartment with Bill and his pal 
Toodles, which may or may not be understood 
in its right meaning — a charitable gesture — by 
every audience. Stunt flying leads Bill to a 
job with Mrs. Newberry, who is Weber's 
sweetheart, and when their happy evening is 
interrupted by that gangster gentleman Bill 
trades his life for a job with him and then 
follow the rum-narcotic running episodes. 
Scenes are broken up by Alabama also getting 
a job with Weber and of course arousing 
Bill's jealousy. Several typical gangster gun 
fights precede Bill's and Toodles' final flight, 
which winds up when they are trapped in the 
air. Toodles bails out when his ship goes 
down, Weber is killed and Bill miraculously 
escapes unscathed when his plane crashes. Then 
the finding and straightening things out with 
Alabama. 

The title and aeronautical atmosphere of the 
picture provide plenty of opportunity for inter- 
est creating exploitation. Tie up with airport 
fliers for aerial ballyhoo is in order. There is 
hardly enough of the Marine element to justify 
any contact with that branch of the govern- 
ment service. The dialogue contains many 
lines that can be transposed into punchy ad 
copy which stresses the thrills, excitement and 
colorful comedy of the picture. Several names 
in the cast — Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Frank 
McHugh, Leo Carrillo and Bette Davis should 
answer the demands for personalities. — Mc- 
Carthy, Hollywood. 

Produced and distributed by Warner Brothers. 
Based on ;in original story by Rian James. Screen 
play by John Francis Larkin. Directed by Alfred E. 
Green. Photographed by James Van Tress. Film 
editor, Ray Curtis. Art director. Jack Okey. Re- 
lease date, January 28, 1933. Running time, 65 min- 
utes. 

CAST 

Bill Keller Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. 

Weber Leo Carrillo 

Alabama Bette Davis 

Toodles Frank McHugh 

Mrs. Newberry Claire Dodd 

The Secretary Sheila Terry 

Steve Harold Huber 

Coffey Tliomas E. Jackson 

Crowley George Pat Collins 

The Colonel Reginald Barlow 

Pilot Pat O'Malley 

Wilson Harold Healy 

Hncheimer Ferdinand Munier 

Pilot Walter Miller 



Long and later a play by the late David Be- 
lasco, the dramatic story of the Japanese girl 
who loves an American officer not wisely but 
too well, has been transferred to the screen 
with painstaking effort and attention to detail. 

The picture, however, by reason of its con- 
tent, rather than any fault of production, is 
rather slow-moving. In consequence, its popu- 
larity at the box office is in a measure prob- 
lematical. The cast is good, and the names 
popular. Sylvia Sidney offers a highly appeal- 
ing Madame Butterfly, and with Gary Grant, 
who is in favor with the feminine contingent of 
the audience, and Charles Ruggles for comedy, 
the exhibitor has three excellent selling names 
for his marquee lights. In support are such 
well known names as Irving Pichel, Edmund 
Breese and Louise Carter. 

The story is simple in itself. Grant and 
Ruggles, American officers, on shore leave in 
Japan, meet Miss Sidney, about to become a 
Geisha Girl. Despite a sweetheart. Sheila 
Terry, at home. Grant takes Miss Sidney as 
his wife. She learns to love him in the Ameri- 
can manner, and when Grant leaves with the 
fleet, continues to keep his home in Japan as 
he left it. She awaits his return, which is 
delayed for three yearSj during which time she 
has a child. Meanwhile, he has married Miss 
Terry. Finally returning with his American 
wife, to whom he has told the story of the 
Geisha Girl, Grant goes to Miss Sidney, who 
has been elaborately preparing for his arrival, 
and tells her that their affair is ended. Send- 
ing her child with a servant to her family, 
Madame Butterfly commits suicide as the pic- 
ture ends. 

This may be rather "touchy" material in 
some communities, so perhaps it would be bet- 
ter to concentrate on the background of the 
famous story, plus the players performing in 
the film. Strike the dramatic side of the 
waiting Japanese wife and son, remaining away 
from any moral situations which may be dis- 
cerned in a consideration of the subject matter. 

The possibilities for lobby displays of the 
Oriental, particularly Japanese character, are 
excellent for attracting pedestrian attention. 
The picture will require hard work in selling, 
but should find reasonable favor with the 
women in particular. — Aaronson, New York. 

Produced and distributed by Paramount. Directed 
by Marion Gering. Screen play by Josephine Lovett 
and Joseph Moncure March. From the story by 
John Luther Long and the play by David Belasco. 
With music from the opera by Giacomo Puccini. 
Incidental music by W. Franke Harling. Photo- 
graphed by David Abel. Release date, December 
30, 1932. Running time, 86 minutes. 

CAST 

Cho-cho San Sylvia Sidney 

Lieut. B. F. Pinkerton Gary Grant 

Lieut. Barton Charlie Ruggles 

Goro Sandor Kallay 

Yomadori Irving Pichel 

Cho-cho's Mother Helen Jerome Eddy 

Cho-cho's Grandfather Edmund Breese 

Mme. Goro Judith Vasselfi 

Suzuki Louise Carter 

Peach Blossom Dorothy Libaire 

Mrs. Pinkerton Sheila Terry 



Lucky Devils 

(RKO Radio) 



Madame Butterfly 

(Paramount) 
Drama 

The long famous "Madame Butterfly" comes 
to the screen as the first of the features B. P. 
Schulberg. as an independent producer, has 
made on the Paramount lot and for Paramount 
release. Originally a story by John Luther 



Drama 

The motion picture stunt men are glorified 
here and their glorification results in a show 
that is packed to the guards with thrilling en- 
tertainment and is so loaded with showmanship 
and exploitation possibilities that the sky is the 
limit in advertising and ballyhoo. 

Starting with a sequence that whirled the 
preview audience into a welter of excitement, 
there is an expose shot that shows the whole 
thrilling bank holdup scene as just a part of 
a picture and then goes on to show the con- 
tributions which the stunt men make that put 
the nerve- jangling smashes into screen enter- 
tainment. All the inside stuff is revealed — the 
airplane dare-devilling, auto crashes, swings, 
leaps, jumps, rescues and what not. 

Yet there is a real story behind all the thrills. 
One that is romantic, dramatic, breezy with 
sparkling comedy, sometimes tragic — as the 
stunt misses fire and the performer is killed — 
a love story that is f/iU of emotion stirring 



MARION 
DAVIES 

plus 

"PEG O' 
MY HEART" 

plus 

LAUGHS! 
TEARS! 
ACTION! 
THROBS! 

plus 

A NATIONAL 
AD CAMPAIGN 

plus 

U'GM SHOW' 
MANSHIP! 

Isn^t that a 
pretty dish to 
set before the 
fansl 

More 
M-G-M 



40 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, I 932 



human interest and a real stunt punch at the 
finish, a boat ride over a roaring cataract that 
enables Skipper, who had turned yellow in the 
eyes of his pals, to get the money that will in- 
sure his wife being properly taken care of while 
their baby is born. 

All the colorful superstitions of the stunt 
men have been included, as have a whole host of 
interesting side lights on the way they live and 
love and hope that their names wont be the 
next to be scratched off the board. In such a 
fast moving succession of thrills, it would ap- 
pear that the picture would be lacking in ap- 
peal to the women. But such is not the case. 
Interwoven through all the excitement is a 
love story, which portrays the woman's fear of 
her mate's hazardous calling that will sink 
right down into the heart of every woman who 
sees it. Likewise it might seem that a con- 
tinuation of thrills would become monotonous, 
yet each different episode is so much a part 
of the main story that it tends to add to the 
suspense and create new interest. 

Properly exploited, making use of an atmos- 
pheric campaign, that it just as exciting and 
interesting as the picture itself, in both adver- 
tising and ballyhoo, it appears that "Lucky 
Devils" can easily be turned into a real money- 
maker. Stress the novelty of this show, its 
color and startling realism. Assure your pa- 
trons that this show features a brand of enter- 
tainment that will alternately hold them sit- 
ting on the edges of their chairs and then stir- 
ring their deepest sympathies ; that it will make 
them gasp and laugh and that the breath tak- 
ing climax will give them a new insight into 
just what men and women sometimes have to 
do to provide screen entertainment. 

There is more than enough to hold the tense 
interest of adults of both sexes and the young- 
sters will be talking about it for weeks after 
they have seen it. — McCarthy, Hollywood 

Produced and distributed by RKO Radio. Directed 
by Ralph Ince. From a story by Casey Robinson 
and Bob Rose, Screen play by Agnes Christine 
Johnston and Ben Markson. Photographed by J. 
Roy Hunt. Release date, February 3, 1933 (tentative). 
Running time, 60 minutes. 



CAST 

Skipper Bill Boyd 

Fran ...Dorothy Wilson, 

Bob ............William Gargan 

Gabby Roscoe Ates 

Happy Bruce Cabot 

Frankie Creighton Chaney 

Doris .....Julie Haydon 

Midge niyllis Fraser 

Ginger Betty Furness 

Slugger William Bakewell 

Rusty Bob Rose 

Neville Gladden James 

Toots Sylvia Picker 

Spence Edwin Stanley 

Cameraman Charles Gillette 



TeilnehmerAntwortetNicht 

The Party Does Not Answer 

(Capital Film) 
Drama 

A drama of a crook, a girl and a clever 
detective, this is fair German screen entertain- 
ment, but offering no assistance to the poten- 
tial patron lacking a knowledge of the 
language. In consequence, the picture must be 
offered to an audience which can fully appre- 
ciate it through understanding of the dialogue. 

Dorothea Wieck is the best cast name for the 
exhibitor who can advisably show the picture, 
since she acquired a considerable and wholly 
justified reputation for her performance in 
the notable "Maidens in Uniform," still play- 
ing on a two-a-day policy in New York. It 
must be recorded, however, that her work in 
the present film does not measure up to the 
standard reached in the earlier film, chiefly by 
reason of the material with which she has to 
work. The name is nonetheless important in 
selling the film. 

The narrative is concerned with the manner 
in which the detective solves the origin of the 
mysterious thefts of the contents of the safe 
of a large company. The gentleman under 
suspicion, posing as the operator of an auto- 
mobile school, is finally forced into admission 



of guilt through the efforts of his attractive 
secretary, played by Miss Wieck, and a young 
man who worms his way into the confidence 
of the criminal, but is in reality the son of the 
owner of the company which the crook victim- 
ized. The romance develops in expected fash- 
ion, and a bit of comedy, as well as excitement 
is introduced when the students of a police 
school become closely involved in the discovery 
of the criminal. When he escapes in a high- 
powered car the students give chase, mounted 
on motorcycles. 

This is fair entertainment for those who, 
through an understanding of German, can more 
readily appreciate the plot and its development. 
One name will mean something to the patrons, 
and should be used to the best advantage. 
There is no real mystery element involved, 
consequently it would be inadvisable to place 
any stress on that angle. — Aaronson, New 
York. 

Produced by Elite Tonfilm. Distributed by Capital 
Film Exchange. Story by Eis and Katscher. Di- 
rected by Rudolf Katscher and Marc Sorkin. Photo- 
graphed by Franz Planer. Sound by Jansen. Re- 
lease date, November 29, 1932. Running time, 76 
minutes. 

CAST 

Nikolai Gustav Gruendgens 

Doris Dorothea Wieck 

Konrad Quandt Gustav Diessl 

Inspector Roller Oskar Sima 

Student Tibor von Halmay 

Brika Truus von Alten 

Body Vladimir Sokoloff 



$li€CT§ 



The Gay Nighties 

(RKO Radio) 
Speed and Laughs 

Clark and McCullough take a dab in politics 
and use the age-old gag of a vampire lure to 
put their opponent out of the race and incident- 
ally get themselves into a peck of trouble. 
McCullough is the political manager; Clark is 
his candidate. Arriving at the convention hotel, 
they find their opponent almost sure of the 
nomination. The hotel is a madhouse of strange 
happenings. A gangster battle, with popping 
pistols and roaring machine guns, rages up and 
down the corridors and through their rooms. 
A newspaper reporter can't find a place to pitch 
his bed. 

Just as McCullough is dressed up to imper- 
sonate a woman and a date is made with his 
rival, a sleep-walking beauty wanders upon the 
scene. Politics is forgotten and even while a 
squad of motorcycle policemen race through the 
corridors, Clark is engrossed in trying to meet 
the sleep-walker. And when all is thought to 
have been arranged, instead of the beauty be- 
ing in the room, it's the wandering reporter. 

The picture moves with lots of speed, and 
laughs tumble over each other. Running time, 
18 minutes. — McCarthy, Hollywood. 



Duck Hunter's Paradise 

(MGM) 

Fair 

Thousands of ducks of all species swarm 
overhead as Mr. and Mrs. Hunter in their 
duck blind among the rushes take quick and 
invariably successful shots at the flocks wheel- 
ing above. Interesting is the manner in which 
their dog retrieves the fallen ducks, in- 
stinctively choosing a wounded rather than a 
dead duck, knowing the wounded may escape, 
and amusing is his encounter with a skunk, 
which ends in disaster and sends him home in 
disgrace. A fair subject. — Running time, 10 
minutes. 

Glad Rags to Riches 

(Educational) 
Appealing 

The Baby Stars present a likable bit with 
melodrama made richly humorous by the youth 



of the players. The tot who played the villain- 
ous proprietor of the night club is particularly 
good. There's a natural appeal to juveniles 
here. — Running time, 11 minutes. 



Gorges of the Ganges 

(Fox) 
Splendid 

Pictorially beautiful, striking in subject mat- 
ter and material, this subject of the Magic 
Carpet series carries the audience into the rac- 
ing currents of the turbulent waters of the 
Ganges River, where the huge and unwieldy 
river junks laboriously make their way up the 
stream, where women beat their clothes against 
the rocks in a crude laundry beside the rush- 
ing tide. Reaching a pinnacle of pictorial im- 
pression is the sequence showing the peasant 
natives, harnessed like horses, dragging the 
boat up stream, sometimes wading to their 
waists, again struggling with animal-like dog- 
gedness at their slaving task. There is cer- 
tainly no need for the absent dialogue here. — 
Running time, 9 minutes. 



The Sponge Divers of Tarpon 

(Stanley) 
Excellent 

The use of Western Electric wide range 
recording equipment at the location of the 
filming has provided this subject with a unique 
and interesting feature of difference. Pictured 
is the work of the Greek sponge divers of Tar- 
pon Springs, Fla., with the actual sound of their 
voices, the movement of the divers and the 
hum of the activity adding much to the effective- 
ness of the subject. Produced by Cinelog Cor- 
poration under the supervision of Lorenzo Del 
Riccio, the short is of wide appeal and gen- 
eral interest, worth a spot on any bill. Lowell 
Thomas renders accompanying dialogue. Run- 
ning time, 11 minutes. 

The Pie-Covered Wagon 

(Educational) 
Novel 

Rather novel, in a measure amusing, is this 
short subject featuring a group of cute baby 
stars, infants but shortly out of the safety pin 
stage, who enact a burlesque upon the covered 
wagon-Indian raid theme, with entertaining re- 
sults. The babies are in the first place attrac- 
tive, in the second amusing in their costumes 
and lastly apparently having the time of their 
lives which reaction with little doubt should 
transfer itself to the audience. An amusing 
novelty. Running time, 10 minutes. 

The Tiger Hunt 

(Principal) 
Unusual 

After a brief introduction. Commander Dyott, 
famed English explorer, renders the accom- 
panying descriptive dialogue to these scenes of 
a tiger hunt, in the grand manner, in the jungles 
of India. Indicating that the death of the 
marauding tiger, the lord of the jungle, is a 
worthwhile event in the jungle, the explorer 
describes the hunt, conducted on the backs of 
one hundred huge elephants trained for the 
purpose. Unusually effective closeups ol the 
fleeing tigers are interesting, but the actions of 
the elephants are perhaps of greater appeal. An 
interesting subject. — Running time, 20 minutes. 

Broadway Gossip 

(Educational) 
Interesting 

There is newness and newsiness in the series 
of the "columnist newsreel" as reported by 
Leo Donnelly. Whether there's a danger of 
overfeeding the public with sensational news of 
the stars and their loves is a subject in itself. 
That the material should be well received seems 
indisputable.— Running time, 9 minutes. 



Norma Shearer's 
at the CapitoL 
Let's go!'' 




The millions whose hearts were touched by the 
pathos and beauty of her work in M'G-M's 
"Smilin' Through" are awaiting eagerly her next 
romantic role. It is based on the stage play 
"La Tendresse" [temporary title) and is now in 
production at the M-GM studios^ i^Xr 



on next page) 




42 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, I 932 



THEATRE RECEIPTS 



The total of theatre receipts from 106 houses in 20 key cities of the country 
for the calendar week ended Decennber 24, 1932, reached $1,009,254, a decrease 
of $126,749 from the total for the previous calendar week, ended December 17, 
when 109 theatres in 20 cities grossed an aggregate of $1,136,003. During the 
more recent seven-day period no new high individual theatre record figures were 
established, while 18 new low record individual house totals were noted. This com- 
pares with no new "highs" and eight new "lows" for the preceding week. 



(.Copyright, 1932: Reproduction of material from this department without credit to Motion Picture Herald expressly forbidden) 



Theatres 



Boston 

Fenway 
Keith's 



1,800 30c-50c 
3,500 30c-55c 



Keith-Boston .. 2,900 25c-5Sc 

Loew's Orpheum 2,200 2Sc-S5c 

Loew's State. . . 3.700 2Sc-SSc 

Metropolitan .. 4,350 35c-65c 

Paramount .... 1,800 30c-S0c 

Buffalo 

Buffalo 3,500 30c-65c 

Century 3,000 25c 

Great Lakes .. 3,000 2Sc-40c 

Hippodrome ... 2,100 2Sc 

Lafayette 3,300 25c 

Chicago 

Chicago ... 4.000 3Sc-68c 

McVickers 2.284 3Sc-68c 

Oriental 3,940 35c-68c 

Palace 2,509 35c-75c 

Roosevelt 1,591 25c-55c 

Cleveland 

Mall 753 15c-25c 

RKO Palace ... 3,100 25c-60c 

State 3.400 2Sc-60c 

Stillman 1,900 25c-35c 

Warner's Lake. 800 15c-S0c 

Denver 

Denham 1.700 15c-2Sc 

Denver 2,500 2Sc-S0c 

Htiffman's Rialto 900 20c-40c 

Orpheum 2,600 2Sc-50c 

Paramount .... 2,000 25c-40c 

Detroit 

Downtown .... 2,750 25c-S0c 

Fisher 2,700 25c-65c 

Fox 5.100 25c-50c 

Michigan 4,000 25c-75c 

United Artists. 2,000 25c-7Sc 



Current Week 



Picture 



"Me and My Gal" (Fox) and.... 13,000 

"Those We Love" (Tiffany ^ 

"Fengruin Poo! Murder" (Radio).. 19,500 



"Afraid to Talk" (U.) 20,000 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 20,000 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 21,000 



'LTnder-Cover Man" (Para.). 



36,000 



"Me and My Gal" (Fox) and.... 16,000 
"Those We Love" (Tiffany) 



"Under-Cover Man" (Para.). 
"Central Park" (F. N.). 



"The Conquerors" (Radio) 

(9 days) 

"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.). 
(4 days) 

"They Call It Sin" (F. N.) 

(3 days) 

"Wild Girl" (Fox) 

(7 days) 
"The Tliirteenth Guest" 

(3 days) (Monogram) 



'The Match King" (F, N.). 



'The Big Drive" (A. L. Rule). 
(25c -55c) 

'Secrets of the French Police". 
(Radio) 



"The Sport Parade" fRadio).... 
"They Call It Sin" (F. N.)... 



14,300 
5,100 
8,900 
2,300 
2,100 
7,100 

2,000 

20,000 
15,000 
13,000 

22,500 
10,000 

1,250 



'The Crooked Circle" 

(World Wide) 

"The Penguin Pool Murder" 17,000 

(Radio) 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 15,500 

(25c -50c) 

"Mr, Robinson Crusoe" (U. A.).. 4,300 



'The Old Dark House" (U.). 



"White Eagle" (Col.) and 

"Silver Lining" (Patrician) 
"You Said a Mouthful" (F. N.). 
(8 days) 

"The Golden West" (Fox) 

(3 days) 

"Big City Blues" (W. B.) 

(4 days) 

"Air Mail" (U.) 



'Fast Life" (MGM) 

(3 days) 
'Central Park" (F. 

(4 days) 



N.). 



'Goona Goona" (First Div.) and. 
■'False Faces" (World Wide) 
'Faithless" (MGM) 



'The Golden West" (Fox). 
"Fast Life" (MGM) 



'revious 



Week 



Gross Picture 



Gresa 



"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.) 15,000 
and "Central Park" (F. N.) 

''Goona Goona" (First Div.) and 22,000 
"Slightly Married" (Chesterfield) 

'Rockabye" (Radio) 22,500 

'Flesh" (MGM) 21,500 

"Flesh" (MGM) 22,500 



'Call Her Savage" (Fox). 



40,000 



"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.).. 17,000 
and "Central Park" (F. N.) 



"Call Her Savage" (Fox) 17,500 

"Red Dust" (MGM) 6,300 

"Too Busy to Work" (Fox) 8,200 

"The Mask of Fu Manchu" 9,800 

(MGM) 



"False Faces" (World Wide)... 



6,700 



'Flesh" (MGM) 26,000 

'Call Her Savage" (Fox) 8,200 

(2nd week) 

'Me and My Gal" (Fox) 15,000 



'False Faces" (World Wide).... 14,000 
(6 days) 

J 



"Rackety Rax" (Fox) 1,700 

"False Faces" (World Wide).... 17,500 



"If I Had a Million" (Para.).... 18,000 
(35c -60c) 

"Sherlock Holmes" (Fox) 3,600 



'Life Begins" (F. N.) and... 
'Virgins of Bali" (Principall 
(2nd week) 



3,100 "Central Park" (F. N.) 3.000 



3,000 "Strange Love of Molly Louvain" 1,800 
(F. N.) 

11,000 "Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 8,000 

(2nd week) 

1.200 "One Way Passage" (W. B.).... 2,750 
1.300 

10.000 "Call Her Savage" (Fox) 12,000 

1,500 "Faithless" (MGM) 1,500 

(3 days) 

2,000 "The Devil Is Driving" (Para.).. 2,500 
(4 days) 



7,500 "No More Orchids" (Col.) 9,600 

10 400 "The Mask of Fu Manchu" 11,200 

(MGM) 

12,500 "Call Her Savage" (Fox) 21,500 

14.600 "Flesh" (MGM) 20,400 

6,700 "Life Begins" (F. N.) and 9,200 

"Virgins of Bali" (Principal) 
(1st week) 



High and Low Gross 

(Tabulation covers period from January, 1931 
to date) 



High 12-5 "Frankenstein" 27,000 

Low 3-25-32 "Explorers of the World". 16,000 

High 4-9-32 "Steady Company" 26,000 

Low 7-9-32 "By Whose Hand?" 16,500 

High 1-24 "Hell's Angels" 32,500 

Low 8-4-32 "Unashamed" 18,000 

High 6-18-32— 

"Hell Divers" "Possessed" andl 

"Sin of Madelon Claudet" / 26,000 

Low 7-18 "Man in Possession" 19,000 

High 1-31 "No Limit" 44,500 

Low 7-4 "I Take This Woman" 30,000 

High 3-28 "My Past" 39,500 

Low 12-23-32 "Under-Cover Man".... 14,300 

High 2-14 "Cimarron" 25,600 

Low 12-9-32 "Rain" 4,700 

High 8-8 "Politics" 35,100 

Low 11-25-32 "Night After Night" 7.800 

High 2-14 "Free Love" 26,300 

Low 7-16-32 "New Morals for Old" 4.200 

High 4-11 "Ten Cents a Dance" 24,100 

Low 6-11-32 "The Secret Witness" 5,800 

High 1-23-32 "Two Kinds of Women". 67,000 

r.ow 12-22-32 "Tlie Match King" 20,000 

High 2-7 "Doorway to Hell" 38.170 

Low 12-20-32 "The Big Drive" 15,000 

High 3-7 "My Pasf 46,750 

Low 12-22-32 "Secrets of the French Police" 

13,000 

High 4-2-32 "Cheaters at Play" 33,000 

Low 12-15-32 "False Faces" 14,000 

High 4-11 "Dishonored" 30,350 

Low 12-21-32 "Tliey Call It Sin" 10,000 

High 5-2 "Laugh and Get Rich" 40,000 

Low 12-23-32 "The Pengviin Pool Murder" 

17,000 

High 12-5 "Possessed" 30.000 

Low 6-20 "Vice Squad" 14,000 

High 10-3 "Five Star Final" 15,000 

Low 7-4 "Big Business Girl" 2,0«0 

High 8-8 "Politiea" 25,000 

Low 11-30-32 "If I Had a Million".... 8,000 

High 1-10 "Hell's Angels" 22,000 

Low 6-25-32 "Forgotten Command- \ 

ments" and "Reserved for Ladies"/ 3,450 



Following its 5 months run at the 
$2 Astor Theatre on Broadway and 
its Road-Show engagements in 
principal cities, "Strange Interlude*' 
comes at popular prices to the thea- 
tres of America. M-G-M is proud to 
give to theatres a new impetus in 
entertainment, a remarkable stage 
play made into a talking picture to 
which time will accord an immortal 
place in film annals. 



V 




The M'G'M 
Netu Year's 
party is still going 
strong on 
next page*' 



44 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 



CTHC/ITCE CECEIPTS — CCNT'Dl 



Theatres 



Current Week 



'revious 



Week 



High and Low Gross 



Picture 



Gross Picture 



Hollywood 



Pantages 3,000 25c-40c 

W. B. Hollywood 3,000 2Sc-SSc 



Indianapolis 

Aswil© ........ 1,100 

Circle 2.800 



Indians 
Lyric . 
Palace 



3,300 
2.000 
2.800 



35c-S0c 
3Sc-S0c 

3Sc-S0c 
3Sc-50c 
3Sc-S0c 



"Prosperity" (MGM) 7,000 

"Central Park" (W. B.) 9,800 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio).. 3,000 

"Tlie Match King" (F. N.) 5,000 

(4 days) 
"Follow the Leader" (Para.) 

(3 days) 

"No More Orchids" (Col.) 8,000 

"Men Are Such Fools" (Radio).. 7,000 

"Payment Deferred" (MGM) ... 4,500 



"The Mask of Fu Manchu'' 
"They Call It Sin" (F. N.) 



"Air Mail" (U.) 



"Central Park" (F. N.). 



Gross 



10,700 
8,800 



3,000 
4,500 



"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.) 6,000 

"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 7,000 

"Flesh" (MGM) 6,000 



(Tabulation covers period from January, 1931 
to date) 



High 4-30-32 "Careless Lady" 22,400 

Low 12-7-32 "Rain" 6,300 

High 2-7 "Little Caesar" 30,00* 

Low 11-7 "Honor of the Family" 7,000 



High 6-13 "Daddy Long Logs" 10,00* 

Low 8-20-32 "Jewel Robbery" 2,500 

High 2-14 "Cimarron" 13,000 

Low 7-30-32 "Westward Passage" 3,500 

High 1-17 "Her Man" 25,000 

Low 9-10-32 "Bring 'Em Back Aliye".. 5,000 



High 5-2 "Trader Horn" 22,000 

Low 12-23-32 "Payment Deferred" 4,500 



Kansas City 

Liberty 1,000 15c-2Sc 

Midland ...... 4.000 2Sc-50c 

Newman 2.000 25c-50c 

Uptown ... 2,000 2Sc-40c 



Los Angeles 



Loew's State .. 2,416 
Paramount .... 3,596 

RKO 2.700 

United Artists 2,000 
W. B. Downtown 2,400 
W. B. Western. 2,400 



25c-65c 
3Sc-70c 
25c-55c 

25c-35c 
2Sc-S5c 
S5c-$1.65 



Minneapolis 

Century 1,640 2Sc-40c 

Lyric 1.238 2Sc-40c 

RKO Orpheum. 2,900 2Sc-SSc 

State ...... 2,300 25c-55c 



"The Most Dangerous Game" 2,300 

(Radio) 

"Payment Deferred" (MGM) .... 6,500 
(7 days and Sat. midnite show) 

"The Devil is Driving" _ (Para.) .'. 5,500 
(7 days and Sat. midnite show) 

"Life Begins" (F. N.) 4,900 

"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 10,700 

"He Learned About Women" 17,000 

(Para.) 

"Penguin Pool Murder" (Radio). 6,500 

Mr. Robinson Crusoe" (U. A.).. 8,000 

"Central Park" (F. N.) 9,400 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 6,900 
(4th week-5 days) 

"Evenings for Sale" (Para.) 4,C(X) 

"Six Hours to Live" (Fox) 2,000 

"The Sport Parade" (Radio) 11,000 

"Rain" (U. A.) 6,000 



"Hell's Highway" (Radio) 2,500 

'Flesh" (MGM) 12,800 

(7 days and Sat. midnite show) 

'Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 6,000 

(7 days and Sat. midnite show) 

'Sherlock Holmes" (Fox) 4,000 



"Flesh" (MGM) 14,750 

"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.) 19,500 

"No More Orchids" (Col.) 1,500 

(3 days) 

"The Mask of Fu Manchu".... 8,650 

'They Call It Sin" (F. N.) 9,700 

'The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 10,000 
(3rd week) 



"Mr. Robinson Crusoe" (U. A.) 4,500 

"Tiger Shark" (F. N.) 2,000 

"Rockabye" (Radio) 12,500 

"Call Her Savage" (Fox) 7,200 



High 1-23-32 "Hell Divers" 30,400 

Low 12-8-32 "Man Against Woman"... 6,000 

High 2-27-32 "Shanghai Express" 25,000 

Low 12-8-32 "Evenings for Sale" 5,000 

High 1-10 "Girl of the Golden West" 8,000 

Low S-21-32 "Lena Rivers" 2.000 



High 10-25 "Susan Lenox" 39,000 

Low 3-5-32 "The Silent Witness" 6,963 

High 10-31 "Beloved Bachelor" 41,009 

Low 2-6-32 "Tomorrow and Tomorrow" 7,500 



High 9-26 "Monkey Business" 32,000 

Low 2-6-32 "Sky Devils" 3,000 

High 2-7 "Little Caesar" 27,008 

Low 4-23-32 "Destry Rides Again" 6,200 



High 5-30 "KiW" 4,000 

Low 1-24 "Men on Call" 1,200 

High 12-14 "Cimarron" 30,000 

Low 12-24-32 "The Sport Parade" 11,000 

High 1-2-32 "Sooky" 10,000 

Low 12-24-32 "Rain" 6,000 



Monfreal 

Capitol 2.547 25c-7Sc 

Imperial .. 1,914 15c-S0c 

Loew's .......... 3,115 25c-75c 

Palace . . . . 2,600 2Sc-75c 

Princess 2,272 25c-60c 

New York 

Cameo 549 25c-75c 

Capitol 4,700 35c-$1.6S 

Criterion 850 50c-$1.65 

Embassy 598 2Sc 

44th Street .... 1,482 25c-$1.10 

Mayfair 2,300 35c-85c 

Palace 2,500 55c -$1.65 

Paramount 3,700 40c-$1.10 

Rialto 1,949 40c-$1.10 

RiToli 2,103 40c-$1.10 

Stnmd 3,000 35c-$1.10 

Winter Garden. 1,949 35c-$1.10 



'Too Busy to Work" (Fox) and.. 9,000 
"Sherlock Holmes" (Fox) 

"Cendrillon de Paris" (French).. 1,800 
and "Le Fils de I'Autre" (French) 

'Faithless" (MGM) 10,000 

'Life Begins" (F. N.) 8,500 

'ITie Crusader" (Majestic) and.. 6,000 
'Hearts of Humanity" (Majestic) 



"Virgins of Bali" (Principal)... 2,900 

(2nd week) 

"Flesh" (MGM) 45,674 

(2nd week) 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.) 15,200 

(2nd week) 

All Newsreel 5,893 

"Maedchen in Uniform" 4,500 

(Krimsky & Cochran) (14th week) 

"The Sport Parade" (Radio) 9,000 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 8,700 

(5th week) 

"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.).. 35,200 

(8 days) 

"Sign of the Cross" (Para.).... 13,100 
(3rd week) 

"If I Had a Million" (Para.).... 14,500 

(3rd week-8 days) 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 18,974 

(2nd week) 

"Afraid to Talk" (U.) 9,513 



"Payment Deferred" (MGM) and 8,500 
"Sport Parade" (Radio) 

'M. de Porceaugnac" (French).. 2,000 
and "Coiflfeur pour Dames" (French) 

"Kongo" (MGM) 11,500 

'If I Had a Million" (Para.).... 10,500 

'Night Club Lady" (Col.) and.. 6,500 
'Wild Girl" (Fox) 



"Virgins of Bali" (Principal) 

(1st week) 
"Flesh" (MGM) 

(1st week) 
"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.)... 

(1st week) 
All Newsreel 



"Maedchen in Uniform" 

(Krimsky & Cochran) (13th 
"Secrets of the French Police".. 

(Radio) 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 

(4th week) 
"Uptown New York" 

(World Wide) (6 days) 
"Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 

(2nd week) 

"If I Had a MilUon" (Para.).... 

(2nd week) 
"The Match King" (F. N.).... 

(1st week) 
"Central Park" (F. N.) 



4,780 
52,504 
15,500 

6,277 

4,400 

week) 
14,650 

7,750 
23,200 
9,700 

16,000 
9,400 
23,742 



High 
Low 

High 

Low 

High 
Low 
High 

Low 
High 

Low 



1-10 "Just Imagine" 
12-23 "The Guardsman' 



Child" 



and 1 
"The Tip-Off"/ 
1-17 "Office Wife" 

12-23-33 "Cendrillon de Paris 
and "Le Fils de I'Autre 

4-2-32 "Fireman, Save My Chil 

7-18 "Stepping Out" 

4-2-32 "One Hour With You".., 

12-23-32 "Life Begins" 

4-1 "City Lights'^ 

12-23-32 "The Crusader" and ) 
and "Hearts of Humanity" ] 



18.000 

8,000 
10,000 

1,800 
16,500 

9,000 
19,500 

8,500 
22,500 

6,000 



High 1-9-32 "Mata Hari" 110,466 

Low 7-2-32 "New Morals for Old" 29,767 

High 1-3 "Reaching for the Moon" 22,675 

Low 5-24-30 "Silent Enemy" 10,800 

High 1-3 Newsreels 9,727 

Low 11-3-32 Newsreels 5,200 

High 12-12 "Frankenstein" 53,800 

Low 4-30-32 "Cohens and Kellys in Hol- 
lywood 7,600 



High 2-7 "Finn and Hattie" 

Low 12-23-32 "The Devil Is Driving".. 

High 2-27-32 "Shanghai Express" 

Low 6-27 "Draeula" and 1 
"Hell's Angels" f 
High 1-9-32 "Dr. Jek^l and Mr. Hyde" 

Low 7-29-32 "Igloo" 

High 1-17 "Little Caesar" 

Low 4-2-32 "The Missing Rembrandt" 

High 9-19 "Five Star Final" 

Low 8-20-32 "Hollywood Speaks" 



85,900 

35,200 
64,600 

4,500 
67,100 

8,000 
74,821 

8,012 
59,782 

5,6-90 




]oan 

Crawford 
in a new 
de luxe 
role with 
slinky clothes 
and luxurious 
backgrounds 
peppy 
pretty 
dramatic 
sexy 



thrilling 
title to be 
announced ! 




(On to next M-G-M page) 



46 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, 1 932 



[THEATKE RECEIPTS — CONT'D 1 



Theatres 

Oklahoma City 

Capitol 1,200 lOo-SSc 

Criterion 1,700 10c-S5c 

Liberty 1,500 10c-3Sc 

Mid-West 1,500 lOc-SSc 

Victoria 850 15c-35c 

Omaha 

Paramount 2,900 25c-S0c 

State 1.200 2Sc 

World 2,500 25c-40c 

Philadelphia 

Arcadia 600 30c-S5c 

Boyd 2,400 35c-7Sc 

Earle 2,000 40c-65o 

Fox 3,000 3Sc-7Sc 

Kariton 1.000 30c-S5c 

Stanley 3,700 3Sc-7Sc 

Stanton 1.700 3Sc-S5c 



Current Week 



Previous Week 



Picture 



Gross 



'The Devil Is Driving" (Para.) 3,000 

'Fast Life" (MGM) 4,900 

'Me and My Gal" (Fox) 1,000 

(4 days) 

'Central Park" (F. N.) 1,000 

(3 days) 

■'The Call It Sin" (F. N.) 3,000 

'Men of America" (Radio) 750 

(4 days) 

"Rain" (U. A.) 5,500 

■'Tiger Shark" (F. N.) 600 

(3 days) 

'Evenings for Sale" (Para.) 400 

(2 days) 

'Mr. Robinson Crusoe" (U. A.).. 5,750 
and "Six Hours to Live" (Fox) 



"Night After Night" (Para.) 2,300 

(6 days) ^ _ „ 

"If I Had a Million" (Para.).... 12,000 
(6 days) 

"Hell's Highway" (Radio) 13,000 

(6 days) 

"Uptown New York" 17,000 

(World Wide) (6 days) 

"Virtue" (Col.) 3,000 

(6 days) 



"Evenings for Sale' 

(6 days) 
"The Sport Parade" 

(6 days) 



(Para.) 11,000 

(Radio) 8,500 



Picture 



Gross 



"Hold 'Em Jail" (Radio) 3,000 

"Flesh" (MGM) 5,000 

"Once in a Lifetime" (U.) 1,100 

(4 days) 

"Breach of Promise" 950 

(World Wide) (3 days) 

"Rockabye" (Radio) 3,000 



'Tess of the Storm Country"... 
(Fox) 



"Rackety Rax" (Fox) and. 
'Sherlock Holmes" (Fox) 



6,250 



"Virgins of Bali" (Principal) 1,650 



6,000 



"Smilin' Through" (MGM) 5,000 

(8 days) 

"Red Dust" (MGM) 12,000 

(2nd week -6 days) 

"Scarlet Dawn" (W. B.) 13,500 

(6 days) (35c-6Sc) 

"False Faces (World Wide) 18,000 

(6 days) 

"Payment Deferred" (MGM) 3,500 

(6 days) 



"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 13,000 

(8 days) 

"The Old Dark House" (U.) 9,500 

(8 days) 



High and Low Gross 

(Tabulation covers period from January, M31 
to date) 



High 2-7 "Illicit" 11,000 

Low 12-24-32 "The Devil Is Driving".. 3,000 

High 2-21 "Cimarron" 15,500 

Low 8-1-32 "Downstairs" 3,000 

High 1-24 "Under Suspicion" 7,200 

Low 6-20 "Big Fight" and 1 

"Drums of Jeopardy" J 900 

High 9-19 "Young As You Feel" 11,000 

Low 12-24-32 "They Call It Sin" 3,000 



High 4-23-32 "Tarzan, the Ape Man". 13,750 
Low S-21-32 "Wet Parade" and "It's \ 

Tough to Be Famous J 4,000 

High 3-14 "Trader Horn" 10.000 

Low 11-18-32 "Faithless and \ 

"The Painted Lady" f 1,100 



High 4-11 
Low 11-28 



"Men Call It Love" 16,000 

"The Cisco Kid" 4,500 



High 12-17 "The Guardsman" 6,S00 

Low 10-1-32 "Make Me a Star" l.SOO 



High 1-2-32 "Makers of Men" 27,000 

Low 7-23-32 "Miss Pinkerton" 12,500 

High 2-7 "Man Who Came Back" 40,000 

Low 6-18-32 "Mystery Ranch" 15,000 

High S-2 "City Lights" 8,000 

Low 11-24-32 "Cabin in the Cotton" 1 

and "Age of Consent" f 2,800 

High 12-19 "Frankenstein" 31,000 

Low 7-25 "Rebound" 8,000 

High 3-21 "Last Parade" 16,500 

Low 11-17-32 "All American" 6.000 



Portland, Ore. 



Fox Broadway.. 1,913 25c-65c 

Fox Liberty .... 1,800 15c -25c 

Oriental 2,040 2Sc-3Sc 

Uaited Artists . 945 25c-3Sc 



"The Mask of Fu Manchu".... 12,000 
(MGM) 

"Under-Cover Man" (Pa!ra.).... 1,000 

"This Sporting Age" (Col.) 3,000 

"Six Hours to Live" (Fox) 3,500 



"You Said a Mouthful" (F. N.).. 11,000 

"Wild Horse Mesa" (Para.) 1,000 

"The Crooked Circle" 4,000 

(World Wide) 

"If I Had A Million" (Para.) .. 2,500 



High 
Low 



1-10 "Min and BiU" 21.000 

10-1-32 "The Crash" 2.800 



High 1-10 "Hell's Angels" 

Low 11-2-32 "Payment Deferred". 



12,500 
1,900 



San Francisco 

Fitmarte ...... 1.400 2Sc-S0c 

Golden Gate ... 2,800 2Sc-65c 

Orpheum 2,800 40c-S0c 

Paramount .... 2.670 2Sc-7Sc 

United Artists.. 1.200 2Sc-S5c 

Warfield ...... 2.700 35c-90c 

Warner Bros. .. 1,380 3Sc-75c 



"The Inn at the Rhine" (Foreign) 1,100 

"No More Orchids" (Col.) 14,500 

"Passion Play" 4,000 

"If I Had a Million" (Para,).... 15,300 

"The Last Mile" (Tiffany) 8,000 

"UndiJ^Cove?^ Man" (Para.) 14,000 



"They Call It Sin" (F. N.) 4,000 "Trouble in Paradise" (Para.). 



"The Last Company" (Foreign) 1,850 
"The Sport Parade" (Radio).... 12,500 



'Flesh" (MGM) 16,500 

'White Zombie" (U. A.) 8,000 

(2nd week-10 days) 

'Me and My Gal" (Fox) 16,000 



7,000 



High 8-4-25 "Bring 'Em Back Alive".. 24,000 
Low 6-11-32 "Lena Rivers" 7,000 

High 12-12 "Frankenstein" 23,000 

Low 12-23-32 "Passion Play" 4,000 

High 1-9-32 "The Champ" 35,600 

Low 8-12-32 "Devil and the Deep" 9,500 



High 3-14 "Parlor, Bedroom and Bath" 28,000 

Low 12-24-32 "Under-Cover Man" 14,000 

High 3-26-32 "Fireman, Save My Child" 19,000 
Low 7-9-32 "Street of Women" 3,500 



Seattle 

Fifth Aveaue... 
Liberty ....... 

Music Box . . . ■ 



2.750 
2,000 



25c-75c 
10c-25c 



950 25c-50c 



Paramount 3.050 25c-75c 

Washington 

C^ri^Ua 1.232 25c-40c 

Earle 2.323 25c-66c 

Fox 3.434 25c-66c 

Loew's Palace.. 2,363 35c-55c 

Metropolitan .. 1.600 25c-SSc 

RKO Keith's... 1.832 2Sc-5Sc 



"The Mask of Fu Manchu" 7,000 

(MGM) and "Evenings for Sale" 

(Para.) (25c-55c) 

"Hell's House" (Zeldman) 2,000 

(4 days) 

"Out of Singapore" (Goldsmith).. 1,800 
(4 days) 

"They Call It Sin" (F. N.).... 2,000 
(5 days) 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio).. 2,250 
(4 days) 

"If I Had a Million" (Para.).... 9,000 



"Uptown New York" (World Wide) 2,500 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 15,500 

"Night After Night" (Para.).... 19,750 

"Red Dust" (MGM) 11,250 

(2nd week) 

"Scarlet Dawn" (W. B.) 4,500 

(6"4 days) 

"The Unwritten Law" (Majestic) 4,500 
(6 days) 



"Faithless" (MGM.) 7,000 

"Explorers of the World" (Raspin) 3,500 

"Three on a Match" (F. N.).... 3,250 

"Sherlock Holmes" (Fox) 9,000 



"Stranger in Town" (W. B.).... 2,750 

"The Match King" (F. N.) .... 16,000 

"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 20,750 

"Red Ehist" (MGM) 17,500 

(1st week) 

"Goona Goona" (First Div.).... 7,500 

"Secrets of the French Police''.. 6,500 
(Radio) 



High 7-30-32 "Milioa Dollar Leri" 18,500 

Low 12-23-32 "Mask of Fu Manchu" ) 

and "Evenings for Sale" ) 7,000 

High 1-10 "The Laah" 11,509 

Low 11-11-32 "Amazon Head Hunters" 3.000 



High 2-28 "City Lights" 14,000 

Low 11-25-32 "The Crooked Circle".. 3.000 



High 1-10 "Paid" 18,000 

Low 4-9-32 "No One Man" and.. } 

"Devil's Lottery" j 7.000 



''MIN AND BILL" HISTORY 
REPEATS WITH 

"TUGBOAT 



ANNIE"! 



Sure it's Marie Dressier and 
Wallace Beery! What a pair for 
one show! What a title! And 

what a story it is! Thank you [Zt^glV'' 
Showmen of M-Q-Mi /o^. 



I 



48 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 




JENriNS* COLrUM 




Alamo, Texas 

DEAR HERALD: 

Don't let anybody tell you that it doesn't get 
cold down here in the Rio Grande valley. This 
town is said to be 300 miles south of the 
southern part of Florida where they grow fruit 
and we have been colder down here than we 
have been in many places in the north. 

It has rained constantly for ten days and ten 
nights and the mercury has hung around 32 
degrees and that is colder than 10 below in 
Nebraska, at least you get colder. Last night 
it dropped to 24 degrees and that fixed their 
beans, corn, tomatoes and peppers, and outside 
of their grapefruit, those are their main crops, 
and this is going to be pretty tough on this 
valley country. 

We have had our tarpon tackle all ready, and 
a man and boat engaged to take us out in the 
Gulf to catch a tarpon and hammer-head shark, 
but the weather has been so rough we have 
been unable to go. That's some more of our 
luck. We wanted to show some of those 
Izaak Waltons up north what real fishing was 
and now we are leaving for the north and 
won't be able to do it. 



Hip hurrah, out comes "What the Picture 
Did for Me," and when we sit down with our 
old Jimmy pipe and a copy of the Herald 
and turn to that department we feel like we 
could lick Jack Dempsey, Mike Malony and a 
Texas Longhorn in one round. It certainly 
is good to see all those familiar names in print 
again, boys we have called on and who have 
shown us such a royal time, and each name 
calls to mind some particular thing or event 
that made a lasting impression on us. For 
instance, there's Joe Hewitt of Robinson, Illi- 
nois, who walloped the tar out of us on the 
golf links and then staked us to a good dinner 
but who gave a woman a check for a renewal 
of his subscription to the Herald when it 
wasn't out and who never had authority to 
take subscriptions, but we got there just in 
time to save him. Joe shouldn't fall for strange 
women, we never do. 

Then there is R. V. Fletcher of Hartington, 
Nebraska, who has to be a swell fellow to live 
in Hartington; we know him and he is. Charles 
Lee Hyde of Pierre, South Dakota, one of the 
boys who helped to make that state a glorious 
place to live provided you are not particularly 
adverse to grasshoppers. Charles Lee fur- 
nishes entertainment for the South Dakota 
solons when the legislature is in session and 
the citizens of that glorious estate during the 
balance of the year. Charles knows a good 
show and nothing short of that will satisfy 
Charles. 

We note also our old friend Harry Pace of 
Audubon, Iowa. There's a regular guy. He 
never carries a gun when we call on him 
and he always calls us "Daddy," which we don't 
like very much. Steve Farrar of Harrisburg, 
Illinois, has his name in that department also. 
Steve is a lover of liver and onions but says 
he doesn't like home brew. He always treated 
us like we were one of the family. 

P. G. Estee of Parker, South Dakota (the 
champion fish liar of the Northwest), gets in 
on the first issue (we knew he would) and 
if the Herald will blue-pencil some of his fish 
yarns it will save us from having to give the 
readers the low down on his piscatorial ability, 
we know him pretty well and would dislike to 
show him up, because he's a pretty fine chap. 

Mrs. P. J. Zorn of Julesburg, Colorado, told 
us when we called on her recently that she 
would send some reports on pictures. We 
knew she'd do it because she prides herself on 
her record for truthfulness. She is not only 
a delightful lady but she's a booster for the 
Herald, and that alone would cover a multitude 
of sins, if she had any, which she hasn't. 

We can't remember whether we have met 



P. A. Stallings of Bowie, Texas, or not. If 
we haven't that's just too bad for both of us, 
but we think we did meet him some three years 
ago. We may meet him again before we leave 
the state. 

W. T. Biggs of Adair, Iowa, says he is no 
kin to Uncle 'Leazer and Aunt Polly Biggs. 
We don't think he is because Uncle 'Leazer 
was a shiftless kind of a guy and W. T. is 
right on the job all the while, that's why the 
Adair folks know they will always be enter- 
tained at his theatre. 

H. J. Longaaker of Glenwood, Minnesota, has 
always been pretty jealous of P. G. Estee 
of Parker, S. D. There's a rivalry between 
them as to who can tell the biggest fish yarn, 
but neither of them are in it with Elmer Gailey 
of Wayne, Nebraska. Elmer is a decendent of 
Ananias and always cops the blue ribbons. 

We were glad to note that Joseph J. Greene 
of Macomb, Illinois, has also reported to the 
department. We met him last summer when 
we were touring Illinois. He manages the 
Illinois theatre for our old friend Mr. Hain- 
line. Mr. Hainline was confined to his bed 
when we called but Mr. Greene showed us 
every courtesy. Those Illinois boys always do. 

There are a lot of other familiar names in 
this department but space forbids further men- 
tion. Many of them are familiar to us, but 
what we would like to know is why H. G. 
Stuttmund of Chandler, Oklahoma ; Phil Rand 
of Salmon, Idaho; C. j. Hartman of Carnage, 
Oklahoma ; that guy Zimmerman of San Mar- 
cus, Texas ; Reeves of Minard, Texas ; Creel 
of Omaha, Nebraska, and dozens of others are 
not shooting in reports. We wouldn't dare 
say that these guys are lazy, that wouldn't 
sound good, but b'gosh, that's our judgment 
just the same, and now if you birds don't want 
to get a good bawling out you better get busy 
and this goes for a lot more of you, too. 

V 

Mr. Ramsaye, editor of the Herald, says 
that the cow is largely responsible for the mo- 
tion picture because she eats mustard and that 
produces gelatine from which the films are 
made. Mr. Ramsaye's knowledge of cowology 
is a little out of plumb. The fact is that 
Nebraska alfalfa and corn are the component 
elements that enter not only into the cow but 
into the making of gelatine as well. We are 
willing to give the cow credit for what she. 
does but that "mustard" stufif don't go. 

V 

That "rainy season" in California would look 
like a dry spell in August compared to this 
Valley weather. Fifteen days and nights of 
constant rain with no letup in sight. We'll 
take twenty below in Nebraska for ours. 

J. C. JENKINS, 

The HERALD Man 



THE 



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DEAL 



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a quality bargain — distinctive and DIFFERENT 



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€N THE 

DOTTED LINE... 

Columbia 

Irving Cummings to direct "Murder of the 
Circus Queen.". . . Florence Britton in "The 
Brand Inspector," D. Ross Lederman direct- 
ing. . . . Harrison Green and Betty Grable 
added to "Child of Manhattan.". . . Raymond 
Hatton and Lew Kelly join "State Trooper." 
. . . Evelyn Sherman and George Humbart 
in "The California Trail.". . . Albert Rogell to 
direct "Under the Sea.". . . Jack Holt in 
"Hurricane Deck.". . . Charles K. French and 
Charles Brindley added to "Ranger Man.". . . 
Buck Jones in "Lost Valley," Lambert Hillyer 
to direct. . . . Eddie Cline to direct "Patrole 
Girl.". . . 

Educational 

Gloria Ann White given contract. . . . Andy 
Clyde in "The Genius.". . . 

Fox 

Alan Livingston given contract. . . . 
Mack Sennett 

Hans Steinke in "The Wrestler," Arthur 
Ripley and Babe Stafford to direct. . . . 
MGM 

Donald Dilloway added to "Men Must 
Fight.". . . Phyllis Barry in an untitled picture 
co-starring Keaton and Durante. . . . Richard 
Bennett added to "The White Sister.". . . 
Melvin Bleifer, Ari Kutai and Eugene Sigaloff 
sign for "Clear All Wires." . . . Joan Crawford, 
Tad Alexander and Louise Closser in an un- 
titled picture. . . . Douglas Walton and Jean 
Parker in "The Lady.". . . 

Monogram 

Doris Hill given term contract. . . . Betty 
Compson and Clyde Cook in "West of Singa- 
pore," Albert Ray directing. . . . 

Paramount 

Fredric March in "The Eagle and the 
Hawk.". . . Adrienne Ames in "Murder at the 
Zoo.". . . Miriam Hopkins and George Raft 
in "The Story of Temple Drake.". . . Peggy 
Hopkins Joyce added to "International House." 
. . . Carole Lombard in "The Way to Love." 
. . . Eddie Quillan in "Strictly Personal.". . . 
Lee Kohlmar added to "She Done Him 
Wrong." . . . George Raft in "Sanctuary." . . . 
Gary Cooper and Sylvia Sidney in "Pick Up." 
. . . Edwin Maxwell and Warburton added to 
"The Queen Was in the Parlor." . . . Kent 
Taylor and George Barbier in "Good Com- 
pany." . . . Frances Dee, Bodil Rosing and 
Torben Meyer added to "The Crime of the 
Century." . . . Sari Maritza, Verna Hillie and 
Dorothea Wieck given contracts. . . . Charles 
Lang, photographer, given new contract. . . . 
Frank McGlynn and Hallene Hill added to 
"Hello, Everybody." . . . 

RKO Radio 

Ed Kennedy and Dot Farley in "Cash Girl." 
. . . Bert Wheeler and Robert Woolsey signed. 
. . . Constance Bennett and Joel McCrea in 
"Our Betters," George Cukor to direct. . . . 
Colin Clive and Billie Burke in "A Great De- 
sire." . . . Ramata Conde signed as technical 
director. . . . Fay Wray in "King Kong." . . . 
Bruce Cabot and Rochelle Hudson in "The 
Past of Mary Holmes." . . . 

Warner-First National 

Ralph Bellamy and Robert Emmett O'Con- 
nor added to "Picture Snatcher." . . . Winnie 
Lightner in "She Had to Say Yes." . . . George 
Brent in "Baby Face." . . . Monroe Owsley 
succeeded Antonio Moreno in "The Key- 
hole." . . . 

World Wide 

Ken Maynard and Muriel Gordon in "The 
Lone Avenger" (formerly "Night Stage"). . . . 
Gregory Ratoff in "Job." 



^^No, no, sonny! That^s for Poppa!^^ 



Fan magazines (they^re a good bar- 
ometer of popularity) tell us that 
since ^^Red Headed Woman'' and 
'^Red Dust'' the new idol of the 
letter-writers is M-G-M's Jean 
Harlow, More beautiful than ever 
—and a truly great actress today- 
Miss Harlow is making a new 
M-G-M hit for you, a drama of 
the night clubs {title later). 




see 
you on 
next page 



50 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 




WHAT THE PICTHKE 
DID E€D ME 




Allied 



THE BOILJNG POINT: Hoot Gibson— A good 
western. Played Dec. 10. — Bert Silver, Silver Family 
Theatre, Greenville, Mich. Town and country patron- 
age. 

Columbia 

AMERICAN MADNESS: Walter Huston— One of 
the best program pictures that we have ever shown. 
Did not draw big business but pleased the ones that 
came. Running time, 76 minutes. — Harold Smith, 
Dreamland Theatre, Carson, Iowa. Rural patronage. 

AMERICAN MADNESS: Walter Huston, Pat 
O'Brien and Constance Cummings — A mighty good 
picture, good cast and will give complete satisfac- 
tion. Played Nov. 11. Running time, 78 minutes — 
Orris F. Collins, Capitol Theatre, Paragould, Ark. 
General patronage. 

MAKER OF MEN: Jack Holt, Richard Cromwell- - 
Fair picture with football college twist which has 
been thoroughly overdone. Did fair at box office. 
Jack Holt extra good as usual. Admission 10-15 
cents. — Robert K. \ancey, Paradise Theatre, Cotter, 
Ark. Railroad and general patronage. 

McKENNA OF THE MOUNTED: Buck Jones— A 
splendid western. 6 reels.— Bert Silver, Silver Fam- 
ily Theatre. Greenville, Mich. Town and country 
patronage. 

NIGHT CLUB LADY: Adolphe Menjou, Mayo 
Methot — Good murder mystery story well done with 
Adolphe Menjou as Thatcher Colt. Suspense splen- 
didly carried. Very satisfactory picture of type. — 
a. H. Greenhalgh, Star Theatre, Ferron, Utah. Small 
town patronage. 

THE NIGHT MAYOR: Lee Tracy— Amusing come- 
dy drama that kept the audience in a—happy state 
and turned them loose with a satisfied smile. Played 
Nov. 13.— C. S. McDowell, Buffalo Theatre. Buffalo, 
Okla. General patronage. 

NIGHT MAYOR: Lee Tracy— Top notch enter- 
tainment. Big box office. — N. S. Tronslin, Menlo 
Theatre, Menlo Park, Cal. General patronage. 

NO MORE ORCHIDS: Carol Lombard— Here's a 
dandy picture for the ladies (and the raenj. Fine 
comedy vein throughout. What a fashion show, and 
Carol is easy to look at. Good reaction for present 
conditions.— E. H. Greenhalgh, Star Theatre, Ferron, 
Utah. Small town patronage. 

THREE WISE GIRLS: Jean Harlow, Mae Clarke, 
Marie Prevost — Dandy little drama that shows life 
as it really is and in which the girl who goes straight 
wins deserved happiness. Played Dec. 4. — C. S. Mc- 
Dowell, Buffalo Theatre, Buffalo, Okla. General 
patronage. 

WAR CORRESPONDENT: Jack Holt, Ralph 
Graves, Lila Lee — Extra good show, extra good draw- 
ing power. Very little war scenes. Good plot. Ad- 
mission 10-25 cents.— Robert K. Yancey, Paradise 
Theatre, Cotter, Ark. Railroad and general pat- 
ronage. 

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND: Lee Tracy, 
Constance Cummings — This is a "pip" of a picture. 
Don't let the critics tell you it is hokum and dis- 
courage you. Hokum is much truer to the real spirit 
of life than realism. This is a house builder, a steady 
patronage winner. Best of all, nobody sings in it, 
thank God. Tracy is not so hot — Constance Cum- 
mings is better — the old senator in the picture does 
the best acting in a year's pictures. — H. J. Brown, 
Majestic Theatre, Nampa, Idaho. 

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND: Lee Tracy 
and Constance Cummings — A very fine picture that 
plepsed all who saw it except those who had read the 
book and come expecting to see exactly what was in 
the book. In the picture all thy used from the book 
was the title, then wrote a very fine little story _ of 
Washington politics that clicks 100 per cent. Running 
time, 78 minutes. — S. M. Farrar, Orpheum Theatre, 
Harrisburg, 111. Average patronage. 



First National 



THE CRASH: Ruth Chatterton— A good picture 
that pleased the handful that saw it. This below 
freezing weather that people are not accustomed to 
knocked the attendance to nothing. — ^Gerald Stett- 
mund, H. S. Theatre, Chandler, Okla. 

DOCTOR X: Lionel Atwill. Lee Tracy. Fay Wray— 
A swell picture that pleased most all we got in to 
see it. Swell comedy by Lee Tracy makes this one 
fine picture. "Technicolor fine, photography good. 
Should please most any audience. Played Dec. 7-8.— 
Cecil Ward, Roxy Theatre, Martinsville, Va. Small 
town patronaKC- 

DOCTOR X: Lionel Atwill and Fav Wray— Plenty 
of good compliments on the technicolor. Quite a 



IN this, the exhibitor's own de- 
partment, the theatremen of the 
nation serve one another with in- 
formation on the box office per- 
formance of product for their mu- 
tual benefit. It is a service of the 
exhibitor for the exhibitor. Address 
all communications to — 

Whai the Picture Did for Me 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD 
1790 Broadway, New York 



horror picture made the more effective because of the 
color. Some comedy by Lee 'Tracy but not enough. 
Drew okay especially for the technicolor. No objec- 
tions heard because of the shivers in the story. Re- 
ceipts better than average. Played Nov. 29-30-Dec. 1. 
Ruiining time, 80 minutes. R. E. Falkenberg, Ma- 
jestic "Theatre, Lexington, Neb. Family patronage. 

FIREMAN SAVE MY CHILD: Joe E. Brown- 
Filled every seat on this one both nights. Well liked 
by my patrons. A good comedy. Admission 10-25 
cents. — Robert K. Yancey, Paradise Theatre, Cotter, 
Ark. Railroad and general patronage. 

THE HATCHET MAN: Edward G. Robinson, Lor- 
etta Young — Fine show enjoyed by all who saw it, 
but didn't get any money due to severe sleet and 
ice storm. Going to play it over. Admission 10-25 
cents. — Robert K. Yancey, Paradise Theatre, Cotter, 
Ark. Railroad and general patronage. 

LIFE BEGINS: Loretta Young, Eric Linden— Ex- 
cellent. Played Dec. 12.— N. S. Tronslin, Menlo The- 
atre, Menlo Park, Cal. General patronage. 

THE TENDERFOOT: Joe E. Brown— Not so good 
as previous Brown efforts, but drew about same. 
Played Nov. 4-5. Running time, 70 minutes. — A. N. 
Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. Small town 
patronage. 

UNION DEPOT: Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.,_ Joan 
Blondell — A good picture that drew extra business — 
Robert K. Yancey. Paradise Theatre, Cotter, Ark. 
Railroad and general patronage. 

YOU SAID A MOUTHFUL: Joe E. Brown— Bad 
weather and no draw but very fine comedy. Pleased 
all and garnered many laughs. Better picture than 
"The Tenderfoot. "^hil March, Gay Theatre, Wayne, 
Neb. Small town patronage. 



Fox 



CALL HER SAVAGE: Oara Bow— Very fine 
show. Better than average. Clara is fine. Male 
leads don!t mean anythinpr. — Phil March, Gay Thea- 
tre, Wayne, Neb., Small town patronage. 

CHANDU. The MAGICIAN: Edmund Lowe— Ap- 
peals to kids. Not too much money in it. — N. S. 
Tronslin, Menlo Theatre, Menlo Park, Cal. General 
patronage. 

Played Dec. 9-10. Running time, 74 minutes. — J. G. 
Estee. S. T. Theatre, Parker, S. D. Small town 
patronage. 

CHANDU, THE MAGICIAN: Edmund Lowe, 
Irene Ware — Satisfactory gross. I would not run it 
in the Roxy, New York, but for the sticks. Big 
attraction for children, old and young.— Herman J. 
Brown, Majestic and Adelaide Theatres, Nampa, 
Idaho. 

CONGORILLA: Ran this on Saturday to increased 
pleased business. Played Dec. 3. — Gerald Stettmund, 
H. & S. "Theatre, Okla. Small town patronage. 



DEVIL'S LOTTERY: Elissa Landi— Miss Landi is 
not the type generally popular in small towns but her 
beauty and acting are worthy of any man's screen and 
also of far better vehicles than she has been given. 
Why do they insist upon giving such poor plays to 

CONGORILLA; Too many of the same. Played 
Dec. 9.— N. S. Tronslin, Menlo Theatre, Menlo Park, 
Cal. General patronage. 

CONGORILLA: The Martin Johnsons— The_ work of 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Johnson, this jwigle picttire is 

far above the average of such pictures. Pleased. 



finished actresses as Miss Landi and Tallulah Bank- 
head? Played Dec. 7-8 Running time, 74 minutes. — 
Horn & Morgan, Inc., Star Theatre, Hay Springs, 
Neb. Small town patronage. 

DOWN TO EARTH: Will Rogers— This is not up 
to Rogers' standard, but it pleased them anyway. 
Drew extra business for three days where we always 
run pictures two days. — Gerald Stettmund. H. & S. 
Theatre, Chandler, Okla. Small town patronage. 

DOWN TO EARTH: Will Rogers— Rogers caine 
back in this at the box office. Tljif public like it. 
Rogers leaves a clean, constructive atmosphere 
behind — no whimsy. — Herman J. Brown, Majestic and 
Adelaide Theatres, Nampa, Idaho. 

THE FIRST YEAR: Charles Farrell, Janet Gay- 
nor — A splendid entertainment. The kind we need, 
— Bert Silver, Silver Family Theatre. "Greenville, 
Mich. Town and country patronage. 

THE FIRST YEAR: Janet Gaynor and Charles 
Farrell— My first Gaynor- Farrell picture since 
"Seventh Heaven," and to be frank, I was disap- 
pointed, both in the picture and the box office. The 
girls in this town would be glad to take up a collec- 
tion to give Farrell a good haircut for Christmas. I 
am told by the Gaynor- Farrell fans that this picture 
is not up to the standard of other releases. Sets, 
sound and supporting members of the cast are excel- 
lent, but why do they have to make Farrell appear 
silly in order to try to create a little sympathy for 
them. Played Dec. 11— S. H. Rich, Rich Theatre, 
Montpelier, Idaho. Family and rural patronage. 

THE GOLDEN WEST: George O'Brien— A typical 
Zane Grey western. Well liked by those who saw it. 
Bad weather and small crowds. Farmer trade is 
practically at a standstill. Played Dec. 9-10. — Horn & 
Morgan, Inc., Star Theatre, Hay Springs, Neb. Small 
town patronage. 

THE GOLDEN WEST: George O'Brien— As a col- 
lege graduate with the side whiskers, O'Brien just 
doesn't fit. He'll have to reduce about 100 pounds 
before he looks like a college chap. As an Indian 
chief he is also a wet blanket, but as a cowboy on 
the horse he is okay. Beautiful scenery, sound okay 
and picture fair. Played Dec. 9 — S. H. Rich, Rich 
Theatre, Montpelier, Idaho. Family and rural pat- 
ronage. 

HAT CHECK GIRL: Sally Eilers, Ben Lyon— 
Good and well liked— Gerald Stettmund, H. & S. 
Theatre, Chandler, Okla. Small town patronage. 

HAT CHECK GIRL: Sally Eilers, Ben Lyon— 
Program picture that escapes the hook. Sally Eilers 
means nothing whatever at the box office. — H. J. 
Brown, Majestic Theatre, Nampa. Idaho. 

ME AND MY GAL: Joan Bennett, Spencer Tracy 
— Just another good picture that will get by and 

please Saturday night audience if you can get them 
in. Good average entertainment. — Phil March, Gay 
Theatre, Wayne, Neb. Small town patronage. 

A PASSPORT TO' HELL: Elissa Landi, Paul 
Lukas — Different from usual run of dramas and held 
interest from start to finish. Played Nov. 6. — C. S. 
McDowell, Buffalo Theatre. Buffalo, Okla. General 
patronage. 

RACKETY RAX: Victor McLaglen, Greta Nissen— 
The racketeers view the huge football crowds and 
decide to "muscle in." They buy colleges of their 
own and substitute their own lineups. Several musical 
comedy numbers interspersed. Pleased Sunday eve- 
ning' patrons. Played Dec. 11-12. Runing time, 75 
minutes.— J. G. Estee, S. T. Theatre, Parker, S. D. 
Small town patronage. 

REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK FARM: Marian 
Nixon, Ralph Bellamy — Step on this one. This was a 
surprise picture of the year for me. Should have 
done extra advertising and played three days. House 
packed two days. As sweet a little story as ever 
flashed on any screen. Excellent acting by Marian 
Nixon and Ralph Bellamy. Admission 10-25 cents. — 
Robert K. Yancey, Paradise Tlieatre, Cotter, Ark. 
Railroad and general patronage. 

REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK FARM: Marian 
Nixon, Ralph Bellamy — This picture was sold by Fox 
with assurance that Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell 
would make it, then changed that cast. But I will 
grant them this, that as far as audiences were con- 
cerned, they did not miss, either. Marian Nixon and 
Ralph Bellamy are certainly a swell team. This little 
Nixon girl is a comer and Janet Gaynor will have to 
watch her laurels, for Miss Nixon carried the audience 
with her all the way with an outstanding performance 
that was great. Then there is another in this cast and 
that is Louise Closser Hale as the snooty aunt, and 
what a trooper, and she must be, for she gave the 
most finished performance and carried the comedy all 
the way. When they ask where she came from, and 
why they have not seen her before, you know she is 
good. Another thing, and that is that it is the first 
remade picture that this house has run that clicked. — 
A. E. Hancock, Columbia Theatre, Columbia City, 
Indiana. 



with each successive picture 

GROWTH! 

John BARRYMORE 

has won a newer and bigger fame .you 
in M'G'M pictures. From"Arsene Sm" 

Lupin" to "Grand Hotel" his box- to next ^ 

office draw has leaped! Now watch! t 

His biggest starring opportunity is in the romantic Broadway hit 

"REUNION IN VIENNA" 




52 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 



SHERLOCK HOLMES: Clive Brook, Miriam Jor- 
dan — Not very many of the present generation know 
anything about Sherlock Holmes, so if you can get 
them in, it will please them. — Gerald Stettmund, H. 
& S. Theatre, Chandler, Okla. 

SIX HOURS TO LIVE: Warner Baxter, John 
Boles, Miriam Jordan — Good programer of this class. 
Pleased 50%. Patrons are looking for something to 
cheer them up and this does not do that. Played 
Dec. 8-9.— D. E. Fitton, Lyric Theatre, Harrison, 
Ark. Small town patronage. 

TESS OF THE STORM COUNTRY: Janet Gay- 
nor, Charles Farrell — This one has received just fair 
reviews but to me is a very fine piece of entertain- 
ment that will take care of itself. — Phil March, Gay 
Theatre, Wayne, Neb. Small town patronage. 

TOO BUSY TO WORK: WiU Rogers— Here is one 
of the few really outstanding pictures on the market. 
Excellent entertainment for entire family. — Phil 
March, Gay Theatre, Wayne, Neb. Small town 
patronage. 

WEEK ENDS ONLY: Joan Bennett, Ben Lyon— 
Extra good show to extra good business at bargain 
prices of 10 cents to all.— Robert K. Yancey, Paradise 
Theatre, Cotter, Ark. Railroad and general patron- 
age. 

WILD GIRL: Charles Farrell, Joan Bennett, 
Ralph Bellamy — We ran this on Saturday and 
pleased practically all. Miss Bennett should not 
waste her talent on this class of stories. She's too 
good. Eugene Pallette is the one that puts the show 
over. Played Dec. 10.— D. E. Fitton, Lyric Theatre, 
Harrison, Ark. Small town patronage. 

WILD GIRL: Charles Farrell, Joan Bennett— A 
splendid picture. Cast good. Story old but good. 
Scenery great. Played Dec. 13-14. — Bert Silver, 
Silver Family Theatre, Greenville, Mich. Town and 
country patronage. 

WILD GIRL: Charles Farrell, Joan Bennett- 
Splendid program picture that should draw in good 
weather. We had no business at all on it. In fact, 
could not even run the second night because of sleet 
on the ground. Played Dec. 15-16. — Mrs. Edith M. 
Fordyce. Princess Theatre, Selma, La. General 
patronage. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

AS YOU DESIRE ME: Greta Garbo— The best 
Garbo I've ever shown and the only one to get any 
money. Admission 10-25 cents. — Robert K. Yancey, 
Paradise Theatre, Cotter, Ark. Railroad and general 
patronage. 

DIVORCE IN THE FAMILY: Jackie Cooper— A 
wonderful picture. The star a wonder. The cast and 
story fine. Please any audience. Played Dec. 15-16. 
— Bert Silver, Silver Family Theatre, Greenville, 
Mich. Town and country patronage. 

DIVORCE IN THE FAMILY: Jackie Cooper, Lois 
Wilson, Conrad Nagel. Lewis Stone — A mighty fine 
little picture. Cold weather hurt business consider- 
ably. Running time, 72 minutes.— Harold Smith, 

Dreamland Theatre, Carson, Iowa. Rural patronage. 

FAITHLESS: Robert Montgomery, Tallulah Bank- 
head — Very fe\y saw this due to terrible weather and 
the fill epidemic Few commented on it so I suppose 
it pleased the few who saw it. It is depressing but 
ends satisfactorily. Played Dec. 11-12.— Mrs. Edith 
M. Fordyce, Princess Theatre, Selma, La. General 
patronage. 

FAITHLESS: Robert Montgomery, Tallulah Bank- 
head — Just another picture that may get by and may 
not. Not for the kids.— Phil March, Gay Theatre, 
Wayne, Neb. Small town patronage. 

FAITHLESS: Robert Montgomery, Tallulah Bank- 
head — Should be "Faithful" instead of "Faithless." 
Story depressing these times. Should not have to pay 
to see and live the depression over. Both Tallulah 
Bankhead and Robert Montgomery are good in their 
parts, and would like to see them in a good light 
comedy. Something, to cheer us up. Played Dec. 
11-12.— D. E. Fitton, Lyric Theatre, Harrison, Ark. 
Small town patronage. 

GRAND HOTEL: Greta Garbo, John Barrymore, 
Joan Crawford, Lionel Barrymore, Wallace Beery — 
Did not click here any better than average picture 
and patrons not satisfied as a whole. Played Dec. 
2-3.— L. G. Tewksbury, Opera House, Stonington, 
Maine. General patronage. 

GRAND HOTEL: Greta Garbo, John Barrymore, 
Joan Crawford, Lionel Barrymore, Wallace Beery — 
Big but not great for small towns. Barely got by at 
the percentage and with extra advertising costs. 
Disappointed. — Herman J. Brown, Majestic and Ade- 
laide Theatres, Nampa, Idaho. 

GRAND HOTEL: Greta Garbo, John Barrymore, 
Joan Crawford. Lionel Barrymore, Wallace Beery — I 
have played 'em big and little for eight years but this 
one took the worst nose dive of any yet. Just fair 
entertainment. Won't go in a small town. Charge 
10-40 cents, too steep for the little fellow. Would 
have got twice the money at 10-25 cents. — Robert K. 
Yancey, Paradise Theatre, Cotter, Ark. Eailrpad and 
general patronage. 

GRAND HOTEL: Greta Garbo, John Barrymore, 
Joan Crawford, Lionel Barrymore, Wallace Beery- 
Patrons disappointed, probably because they had 
heard about it having been shown at $1.50. Lionel 
Barrymore and Joan Crawford received favorable 



HERE'S COOPERATION 
WITH A CAPITAL "S" 

Harold &mith, proprietor of the 
Dreamland theatre at Carson, Iowa, 
sends us the kind of postcard message 
that all contributors to this depart- 
ment like to read. Here it is: 

"I have not received any report 
blanks for the 'What the Picture Did 
for Me" department. 

"Will you please send some." 

They're already Carson-bound. 



comment. None liked Greta Garbo. We had a few 
leave on it. But it's a good picture at that. Not as 
good as some others for small town. Played Dec. 
1-2.— D. E. Fitton, Lyric Theatre, Harrison, Ark. 
Small town patronage. 

HUDDLE: Ramon Novarro: Best Ramon Novarro 
since "The Pagan" and did plenty of business. Wish 
we could have had "What the Picture Did for Me" 
department then. If I had known what it was and 
how it drew I could have had $20 or $30 more money 
by getting out and working. Admission 10-25 cents. 
— Robert K. Yancey, Paradise Theatre, Cotter, Ark. 
Railroad and general patronage. 

KONGO: Walter Huston, Lupe Velez — Good acting 
but terrible story. Pleased no one. — Bert Silver, Sil- 
ver Family Theatre, Greenville, Mich. Town and 
country patronage. 

KONGO: Walter Huston, Lupe Velez— Don't play 
this on Sunday. I did, and to my sorrow. The acting 
is splendid but the story very depressing. It did not 
draw and those who saw it complained. — Mrs. Edith 
M. Fordyce, Princess Theatre, Selma, La. General 
patronage. 

MASK OF FU MANCHU: Boris Karloflf, Lewis 
Stone, Karen Morley, Myrna Loy — Another horror 
picture that stretches the imagination. It may get 
the business but they will not like it too much. 
Over-drawn, not logical that such things happen. — 
A. E. Hancock, Columbia Theatre, Columbia City, 
Ind. Small town patronage. 

MASK OF FU MANCHU: Boris Karloflf, Karen 
Morley, Lewis Stone, Myrna Loy — Good of its kind. 
Too many such pictures been released lately. Patrons 
did not care for it. Played Dec. 6-7.— D. E. Fitton, 
Lyric Theatre, Harrison, Ark. Small town patronage. 

NEW MORALS FOR OLD: Robert Young, Louis 
Stone — Not much show and business the same. Ad- 
mission 10-25 cents. — Robert K. Yancey, Paradise 
Theatre, Cotter, Ark. Railroad and general patronage. 

PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES: Laurel and Hardy 
— A good funny feature. Satisfied them all. 6 reels. 
— Bert Silver, Silver Family Theatre, Greenville, 
Mich. Town and country patronage. 

PAYMENT DEFERRED: Charles Laughton. Mau- 
reen O'Sullivan — One of the worst Metro has ever 
made. More walkouts than on any picture we have 
ever played. Patrons remarked that they came to 
be entertained, not to sob and sit horrified. Although 
acting was fine it just didn't please the few we did 
get in. Played Dec. 5-6. — Cecil Ward, Roxy Theatre, 
Martinsville, Va. Small town patronage. 

PROSPERITY: Marie Dressier and Polly Moran— 
Lots of good clean comedy. A very good family pic- 
ture. Played Nov. 22-23. Running time, 76 minutes. 
— Orris F. Collins, Capitol Theatre, Paragould, Ark. 
— General patronage. 

RED DUST: Clark Gable, Jean Harlow— A mighty 
fine feature. Stars extra good and cast fine. Played 
Dec. 11-12.— Bert Silver, Silver Family Theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. Town and country patronage. 

RED DUST: Jean HaHow, Clark Gable— A swell 
picture, and should go over anywhere. Business bet- 
ter than last few Wednesdays and Thursdays. Fine 
acting by Jean Harlow and Clark Gable makes this a 
wonderful picture. Had lots of compliments on how 
good it was. Played Dec. 16-17.— Cecil Ward, Roxy 
Theatre, Martinsville, Va. Small town patronage. 

RED HEADED WOMAN: Jean Harlow. Chester 
Morris — This one ranked third for house records. Just 
a fair picture but will do business. Admission 10-25 
cents. — Robert K. Yancey, Paradise Theatre, Cotter, 
Ark. Railroad and general patronage. 

SMILIN* THRU: Norma Shearer, Fredric March. 
Leslie Howard — One of the best pictures we have had 
in many moons. Plenty of compliments from patrons 
and patrons still talking about it. We need more 
that cause favorable comment a few days after play- 
ing. Played Dec. 4-5.— D. E. Fitton, Lyric Theatre, 
Harrison, Ark. Small town patronage. 

SMILIN' THRU: Norma Shearer. Fredric March, 
Leslie Howard — Business satisfactory. "This fine pic- 
ture demonstrates the need of romance in steady 
quantity and with plenty of sentiment, a need not 



filled by the modernistic product. Romance will out- 
live modernism.— H. J. Brown, Majestic Theatre, 
Nampa, Idaho. 

SMILIN' THRU: Norma Shearer, Fredric March. 
Leslie Howard— A fine picture but a little over the 
heads of the small town theatre goers. It will please 
and it is artistically done with Norma Shearer abso- 
lutely at the top of her form in putting over the pic- 
ture. It is a credit to a lot of them that we have 
run it, in that it is clean with a sweet story. — A. E. 
Hancock, Columbia Theatre, Columbia City, Indiana. 

UNASHAMED: Helen Twelvetrees, Robert Young, 
Lewis Stone — A fair piece of entertainment which did 
average business. Extra fine acting by every member 
of the cast. Admission 10-25 cents. — Robert K. Yan- 
cey, Paradise Theatre, Cotter, Ark. Railroad and 
general patronage. 

WASHINGTON MASQUERADE: Lionel Barry- 
more, Karen Morley— Very good picture depicting life 
in the Capital. Played during a cold wave and busi- 
ness was decidedly oflf. No fault of the picture. Run- 
ning time, 74 minutes. — Harold Smith, Dreamland 
Theatre, Carson, Iowa. Rural patronage. 

Monogram 

THIRTEENTH GUEST: Ginger Rogers— Just 
wouldn't come out for this and you can't blame 
them much. Just another mystery story and we 
are having too many. Acting is no good. Record- 
ing and photography is plenty bad. Played Dec. 12- 
13. Running time, 66 minutes.— Cecil Ward. Roxy 
Theatre, Martinsville, Va. Small town patronage. 

Paramount 

THE BIG BROADCAST: Stuart Erwin, Leila 

Hyams, Bmg Crosby and Radio Stars— A "pip" of 
a picture that should get plenty everywhere. If 
the producers don't run the idea to death we can 
use one like this every three months regularly. Para- 
mount is systematically knocked by competitors but 
It makes good pictures.— H. J. Brown, Majestic The- 
atre, Nampa, Idaho. 

THE BIG BROADCAST: Stuart Erwin, Leila Hyams 
and Radio Stars— Some parts in this picture are good; 
others are bad, but as a whole it should please. Busi- 
ness fair. Played Dec. 19-20.— Cecil Ward, Roxy 
Theatre, Martinsville, la. Small town patronage. 

THE BIG BROADCAST: Stuart Irwin, Leila Hy- 
ams, Bing Crosby and other radio stars — Far above 
average. Radio must have sold this picture for they 
came out like old times. Played Nov. 27-28-29. Run- 
ning time, 83 minutes.— I. N. Kuhl, Rivoli Theatre, 
Seward, Neb. General patronage. 

BLONDE VENUS: Marlene Dietrich— Very well 
received. Not a big picture but will get over fairly 
well where Miss Dietrich is liked. Running time, 
85 minutes. — Harold Smith, Dreamland Theatre, Car- 
son, Iowa. Rural patronage. 

BLONDE VENUS: Mariene Dietrich. This did not 
go over for us in spite of extra exploitation. Although 
it is a picture that holds interest, the unpleasant 
theme keeps it from being a small town or family 
picture. Played Nov. 21-22. Running time, 82 min- 
utes—A. N. Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. 
Small town patronage. 

DEVIL AND THE DEEP: Gary Cooper— We made 
a mistake in playing this on Saturday. Although 
the submarine scenes have quite a bit of action they 
haven't enough for Saturdav. Good picture that drew 
only fair. Played Nov. 18-19. Runnmg time, 70 min- 
utes—A. N. Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. 
Small town patronage. 

HERITAGE OF THE DESERT: Randolph Scott, 

Sally Blane— Good out-of-door picture, with plot Just 
like many others. Only diflference: this had Zfane 
Grey's name as author and Paramount charged us 
extra for that. Played Dec. 16-17.— J. G. Estee, S'. T. 
Theatre, Parker, S. D. Small town patronage. 

HERITAGE OF THE DESERT: Randolph Scott 
and Susan Fleming — These class westerns certainly 
please a small town audience. They like 'em.— C. L. 
Niles, Niles Theatre, Anamosa, Iowa. Small town 
patronage. 

HORSEFEATHERS: Four Marx Bros.— Audience 
about equally divided. Some pleased; others thought 
it an over-dose of nonsense. That's all it is — eight 

reels of nonsense. Played Dec. 18-19.— J. G. Estee, 
S. T. Theatre, Parker, g, D. Small town patronage. 

HORSEFEATHERS: Four Marx Brothers— Disap- 
pointmg business. Sameness about these Marx 
Brothers. Not all audience pleased. — Herman J. 
Brown, Majestic and Adelaide Theatres, Nampa, 
Idaho. 

HORSEFEATHERS: Four Marx Brothers— As good 
as any of the Marx Brothers' pictures. Drew good 
business and seemed to please everyone. My patrons 
did not seem to think that it was any better than 
the previous ones, however, but it pleased .nnd that is 
what we want in pictures today. Running time, 68 
minutes.— Harold Smith, Dreamland Theatre, Car- 
son, Iowa. Rural patronage. 

HORSE FEATHERS: Four Marx Brothers— These 
boys are a scream and everybody goes crazy about 
them. We need more pictures made by them. Ex- 
cellent attendance. Played Oct. 16-17. Running time, 
68 minutes.— J. E. Courter, Courter Theatre, Gallatin, 
Mo. General patronage. 

HORSE FEATHERS: Four Marx Brothers— Box 



Fhoto shows men at work on Broadway's most 
celebrated electric sign at M-G-M's Astor Theatre 



''BIG enough for the 
ASTOR-'PIGBOATS!" 



M'G'M's Giant submarine romance 
"Pigboats" (title to be changed). It's 
another "Hell Divers" says Coast opinion. 

In the cast: Bob Montgomery^ 
Walter Huston, Jimmy Durante, 



etc. Filmed with the cooperation of^^^j 



That's what Hollywood is saying about 



the U. S. Navy. 




Happy hlew Yeari Go on to next page 



54 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, 1932 



office natural. Played Nov. 6-7. — C. R. Cook, Missouri 
Theatre, Maryville, Mo. Average patronage. 

LOVE ME TONIGHT: Maurice Chevalier and 
Jeanette McDonald — Some of my patrons like Cheva- 
lier and some of them don't. Nevertheless, he is a 
great actor and does great work in this one. Atten- 
dance fair. Played Nov. 6-7. Running time, 104 min- 
utes. — J. E. Courter, Courter Theatre, Gallatin, Mo. 
General patronage. 

LOVE ME TONIGHT: Maurice Chevalier— Does 
not quite come up to the previous Chevalier pictures. 
Patrons were not very enthusiastic about it and it 
did not do much at the box office. Running time, 104 
minutes— Harold Smith, Dreamland Theatre, Carson, 
Iowa. Rural patronage. 

LOVE ME TONIGHT: Maurice ChevaUer, Jeanette 
MacDonald — Not near as good as "One Hour with 
You." Pretty spicy, too. His next one will have to 
be better if he stays in the limelight. Played Dec. 
16. — H. J. Eagan, American Theatre, Wautoma, Wis. 
Rural patronage. 

LOVE ME, TONIGHT: Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette 
MacDonald — Complete bc.x office flop, many turned 
away in front of box office. Pictures like this are 
a triumph for the director and a defeat for the ex- 
hibitor. Clever, artistic, beautifully produced, it 
should be run at a specialized art theatre in New 
York. A treat for sophisticates, a headache for prac- 
tical showmen. — Herman J. Brown, Majestic and Ade- 
laide Theatres, Nampa, Idaho. 

LOVE ME TONIGHT: Maurice Chevalier and Jean- 
ette MacDonald — Slightly better than average busi- 
ness, picking up on second night, which always proves 
that a picture is liked. Played Nov. 28-29. Running 
time, 104 minutes. — A. N. Miles, Eminence Theatre, 
Eminence, Ky. Small town patronage. 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN: Jack Oakie and 
Marian Nixon — Great show and a wonderful Saturday 
night picture. Will make Saturday night look like 
old times.— C. L. Niles, Niles Theatre, Anamosa, 
Iowa. Small town patronage. 

MOVIE CRAZY:— Harold Lloyd, Constarice Cum- 
mings — Drew very good and was well received. Did 
not receive the laughs that Lloyd generally brings. 
Well worth playing though if you do not pay too 
much for it. Running time, 96 minutes— Harold Smith, 
Dreamland Theatre, Carson, Iowa. Rural patronage. 

NIGHT AFTER NIGHT: George Raft— Just fair. 
The young people seemed to like it. Another racketeer 
picture with just a little different twist. The cast 
is good and they all do well with their parts. The 
trouble is with the story. Shakespere was right, 
"the play's the thing." Give me a good story and 
forget the cast. Played Dec. 14.— S. H. Rich, Rich 
Theatre, Montpelier, Idaho. Family and rural patro" 
age. 

NIGHT AFTER NIGHT : George Raft and Constance 
Cummings — Very entertaining picture. Lots of good 
comments from the cash customers, although it did 
not draw so good. Played Dec. 4-5, Running time, 
70 minutes.— Orris F. Collins, Capitol Theatre, Para- 
gould. Ark. General patronage. 

THE NIGHT OF JUNE 13: Clive Brook, Lila Lee, 
Mary Boland — This picture made me more money 
than any picture I have played in the last six months. 
While it is not anything to get excited over it is 
a good little picture and pleased the majority. Run- 
ning time, 72 rninutes. — Harold Smith, Dreamland 
Theatre, Carson, Iowa. Rural patronage. 

THE NIGHT OF JUNE 13: Qive Brook, Frances 
Dee and Gene Raymond — One of the nicest shows we 
have shown for many moons. Any audience will like 
this. Wonderful direction. Recording good. Played 
Nov. 13-14.— C. Proctor, SuUana Theatre, Williams, 
Ariz. Small town patronage. 

THE NIGHT OF JUNE 13: Clive Brook, Frances 
Dee and Gene Raymond— This was a good picture for 
the kind. Some of my patrons liked it and others 
didn't. Running time, 72 minutes. — J. E. Courter, 
Courter Theatre, Gallatin, Mo. General patronage. 

70,000 WITNESSES: Phillips Holmes, Charles 
Ruggles — one of the best pictures I have ever played. 
Charles Ruggles keeps the patrons laughing from 
start to finish. Ideal for small towns.— P. H. Billlet, 
Coliseum Theatre, Annawan, HI. Small town patron- 
age. 

70,000 WITNESSES: Phillips Holmes— Fine picture. 
Good holiday business. New plot. Paramount is 
making good this year. People turning from box 
office, however, on football stories. One more mess of 
them will be all flops. — Herman J. Brown, Majestic 
and Adelaide Theatres, Nampa, Idaho. 

70,000 WITNESSES: Phillips Holmes— A real pro- 
duction that holds interest from start to finish. Para- 
mount is clicking this year better than ever. This is 
a real good mystery show and will please without any 
doubt. Played Nov. 25.— H. J. Egan, American 
Theatre, Wautoma, Wis. Rural patronage. 

TROUBLE IN PARADISE: Miriam Hopkins, Her- 
bert Marshall, Kay Francis — Smart, clever entertain- 
ment. One of the higher type pictures that will take 
some selling in a small town but if you can get them 
in, it will please and they will like it. — A. E. Hancock, 
Columbia Theatre, Columbia City, Ind. Small town 
patronage. 

TROUBLE IN PARADISE: Kay Francis, Miriam 
Hopkins, Herbert Harshall — Pleased almost every- 
body. Played Dec. 10.— L. G. Tewksbury, Opera 
House, Stonington, Maine. General patronage. 



MARTINA RISES 
TO REMARK 

C. V. Martina, Playhouse theatre at 
Clyde, N. Y., and a veteran contribu- 
tor to "What the Picture Did for 
Me," has this to say anent comedies: 

"Most comedies released nowadays 
do not make patrons laugh, and some 
make them cry for the time they 
must spend to see them through in 
order to wait for the feature. More 
action and less talking would prob- 
ably help. The producers are trying 
to save by talk instead of moving 
about different places. Producers 
would do the industry a lot of good 
by screening the comedies they made 
in silent days and make them accord- 
ingly." 



TROUBLE, IN PARADISE: Miriam Hopkins and 
Herbert Marshall — Now, boys, here is a real picture. 
Give this your best dates and sleep on it. It's 100% 
entertainrtient, perfect cast, sets and sound. The 
story is great. Played Dec. 7 — S. H. Rich, Rich 
Theatre, Montpelier, Idaho. Family and rural patron- 
age. 

TROUBLE IN PARADISE: Herbert Marshall, 
Miriam Hopkins and Kay Francis — A real smart pic- 
ture that has plenty of class and will really please. 
My patrons thoroughly enjoyed it. Played Dec. 14-15. 
Running time, 73 minutes — Orris F. Collins, Capitol 
Theatre, Paragould, Ark. General patronage. 

RKO Radio 

AGE OF CONSENT: Richard Cromwell, Eric 
Linden — Grossed well with "not recommended for 
children" warning in advertisements. Got the girls, 
who liked it. — Herman J. Brown, Majestic and Ade- 
laide Theatres, Nampa, Idaho. 

BIRD OF PARADISE: Dolores Del Rio, Joel Mc- 
Crea — Swell. Good results. Worth a Sunday spot 
anywhere. — N. S. Tronslin. Menlo Theatre, Menlo 
Park, Cal. — ^General patronage. 

BIRD OF PARADISE: Dolores Del Rio and Joel 
McCrea — Drew better than average. Only comments 
against it were in the change in story from the orig- 
inal play. However, nice entertainment. Played Nov. 
1-2-3. Running time, 80 minutes. — R, E. Falkenberg, 
Majestic Theatre, Lexington, Neb. Family patronage, 

BRING 'EM BACK ALIVE: An interesting edu- 
cational jungle picture that draws well and satisfies 
90%, Very appropriate for special matinee for schools. 
Played Dec. 1.— C. S. McDowell, Buffalo Theatre, 
Buffalo, Okla. General patronage. 

BRING 'EM BACK ALIVE: Fine in every respect. 
The animal shots are wonderful. — A. E. Hancock, 
Columbia Theatre, Columbia City, Indiana. 

COME ON DANGER: Tom Keene— Fair picture, 
light business. This whole industry has been built up 
on the western trade. I wonder how many hundred 
millions of dollars has been spent by the public in 
twenty-five years to see this same story. — H. J. 
Brown, Majestic Theatre, Nampa, Idaho. 

THE CONQUERORS: Ann Harding, Richard Dix 
— A good picture but that's all. No epic, Phil 
March, Gay Theatre, Wayne, Neb. Small town 
patronage. 

HELL'S HIGHWAY: Richard Dix— Another chain 
gang picture. Patrons liked it very much. Played 
Nov. 29 — Orris F. Collins, Capitol Theatre, Paragould, 
Ark. General patronage. 

HOLD 'EM JAIL: Wheeler and Woolsey— Cleaned 
up with this swell picture. If advertised. Wheeler and 
Woolsey collect dough. — Herman J. Brown, Majestic 
and Adelaide Theatres, Nampa, Idaho. 

HOLD 'EM JAIL: Wheeler and Woolsey— One 
continuous laugh. Best comedy so far this year. 
Played Dec. 5. — L. G. Tewksbury, Opera House, 
Stonington, Maine. General patronage. 

HOLD 'EM JAIL: Wheeler & Woolsey— These two 
are getting worse all the time and this picture is the 
poorest of the lot. Unless they put out a real pic- 
ture, it's going to be just too bad for these boys, — 
Gerald Stettmund, H. & S. Theatre, Chandler, Okla. 
Small town patronage. 

HOLD 'EM JAIL: Bert Wheeler and Robert 
Woolsey — The champion cut-ups uphold their reputa- 
tion as the aces of fun-land. Burlesque football game 
a scream. Good business tonic. Played Dec. 8. — C. S. 
McDowell. Buffalo Theatre, Buffalo. Okla, General 
patronage. 



HOLD 'EM JAIL: Bert Wheeler and Robert 
Woolsey — A fair comedy but not up to their standard. 
Played Dec, 11-12. Running time, 74 minutes — Orrie 
F. Collins, Capitol Theatre, Paragould, Ark. General 
patronage. 

LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE: Mitzi Green— Pleased 
the children and half the grown-ups. Played Dec. 10. 
— L. G. Tewksbury, Opera House, Stonington, Maine. 
Genera) patronage. 

LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE: Mitzi Green— Great 
show for the kids. Best yet. — Phil March, Gay 
Theatre, Wayne, Neb. Small town patronage. 

LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE: Mitzi Green— Ran 
this only one day. We made arrangements to have 
the schools announce that all grade pupils would be 
admitted after school was dismissed for 5c, high school 
children 10c. This special price was good until 5:30 
p.m. We had a house full of kids that helped the 
gross considerably. Adults do not care much for 
this picture and I would suggest you give some in- 
ducement to get the kids in to see it. — Gerald Stett- 
mund, H. & S. Theatre, Chandler, Okla. Small town 
patronage. 

ROAR OF THE DRAGON: Richard Dix, Gwili 
Andre — Action, pathos, comedy, suspense, novelty. 
This proved a good week-end feature and drew good 
patronage. Played Oct. 20.— C. S. McDowell, Buffalo' 
Theatre, Buffalo, Okla. General patronage. 

ROCKABYE: Constance Bennett— Another good 
Constance Bennett show. Action moves slowly, how- 
ever, and where they want life and pep this won't 
satisfy but believe the cast will please majority. — 
Phil March, Gay Theatre, Wayne, Neb. Small town 
patronage. 

STATE'S ATTORNEY: John Barrymore, Helen 
Twelvetrees — Excellent trial picture that went over 
good. John Barrymore does some great work. — P. H. 
Billiet, Coliseum Theatre, Annawan, 111. Small town 
patronage. 

THIRTEEN WOMEN: Irene Dunne, Myrna Loy— 
Good gross. Fair picture. Stress the author, who 
means more at the box office than the cast. The 
producers failed to stress the author sufficiently in 
their advertising mats. Producers buy big writer 
names and then conceal them.— Herman J. Brown, 
Majestic and Adelaide Theatres, Nampa, Idaho. 
[Author, Tiffany Thayer.— Ed.] 

WHAT PRICE HOLLYWOOD: Constance Ben- 
nett — Connie holds up her reputation in this clever 
story of the inside of Hollywood and fulfilled the 
expectation of her friends. Played Nov. 27. — C. S. 
McDowell, Buffalo Theatre, Buffalo, Okla. General 
patronage. 

Tiffany 

HELL FIRE AUSTIN: Ken Maynard— One of 
Ken's best. Plenty of action, a cross-country race 
which furnishes the whole plot. Had a good Satur- 
day regardless of Christmas shopping and falling 
snow. Should please any Saturday crowd that ex- 
pects a rough and roudy Western. Played Dec. 17. 
—Cecil Ward, Roxy Theatre, Martinsville, Va. Small 
town patronage. 

THE LAST MILE: Preston Foster— An excellent 
picture of its type, but did not draw film rental on 
account of stars being unknown. Played Dec. 6. 
Running time, 84 minutes— Orris F. Collins, Capitol 
Theatre, Paragould, Ark. General patronage. 



Universal 

AIR MAIL: Pat O'Brien, Ralph Bellamy— Good for 
any day in week. Phil March, Gay Theatre, Wayne, 
Neb. Small town patronage. 

THE ALL AMERICAN: Richard Arlen— A real 
good story and a dandy show. Better than the "Spirit 
of Notre Dame" but did not draw for me. If you 
can get them in, it will please. Universal has some 
real shows this year. Played Dec. 17.— H. J. Egan, 
American Theatre, Wautoma, Wis. Rural community 
patronage. 

THE ALL AMERICAN: Richard Arlen and Gloria 
Stuart— Just a little better than average business. 
Especially pleased all football fans. Lots of remarks 
that it's a dandy football story. It drew those who 
knew the fame of the all- American football team and 
satisfied them to see the action of this team. Didn't 
seem to be a lot of dumb actors but almost true 
football story of these great players. Played Nov. 
27-28. Running time, 80 minutes.— R. E. Falkenberg, 
Majestic Theatre, Lexington, Neb. Family patronage. 

BACK STREET: John Boles, Irene Dunne— Splen- 
did picture beautifully acted. Profitable business. 
John Boles has not yet realized his possibilities. He 
can be made into first rate box office. Irene Dunne 
a fine actress.— Herman J. Brown, Majestic and 
Adelaide Theatres, Nampa, Idaho. 

BACK STREET: Irene Dunne, John Boles— Fine_ 
picture. Good money maker and should be run by' 
all.— N. S. Tronslin, Menlo Theatre, Menlo Park, Cal. 
General patronage. 

BACK STREET: Irene Dunne, John Boles— The 
biggest draw of this season and it pleased nearly 
100% More of a woman's picture but it is a real one 
and deserves extra advertising. Book is well read 
and everyone seems to know in advance that it is a 
good show. Played Nov. 30.— H. J. Eagan, American 
Theatre, Wautoma, Wis. Rural patronage. 



ATTENTION! 



"rm coming soon in Metro^Goldwyn- 
Mayer's TARZAN AND HIS MATE!'^ 





march, 
to next 



56 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, I 932 



BACK STREET: Irene Dunne, John Boles— Hardly 
a small town theme. In spite of that, the picture 
was generally well received and the acting was won- 
derful. Played Dec. 11-12. Running time, 89 minutes. 
Horn & Morgan, Inc., Star Theatre, Hay Springs, 
Neb. Small town patronage. 

BACK STREIET: John Boles and Irene Dunne;- 
A picture that you are really proud to present. Will 
draw extra business. Pleased 100 percent. Played 
Nov. 27-28. Running time, 84 minutes— Orris F. 
Collins, Capitol Theatre, Paragould, Ark. General 
patronage. 

HIDDEN GOLD: Tom Mix— Didn't hold up like 
usual Saturdays. Might be because of holiday shop- 
ping. Picture, although not up to the Tom Mix stan- 
dard, has plenty action but not enough fighting and 
"shootin' 'em up." Should please. Played Dec. 10. 
—Cecil Ward, Roxy Theatre, Martinsville, Va. Small 
town patronage. 

IGLOO: Esquimaux who are better actors than 
many in Hollywood— Splendid picture, not given 
proper credit by critics. A gold mine if it was ex- 
ploited as a road show by a real showman. Work 
with schools, which should be let out for students to 
see this wonderful picture. Didn't know how good it 
was or would have cleaned up. Did excellent business 
on it anyway. — Herman J. Brown, Majestic and Ade- 
laide Theatres, Nampa, Idaho. 

OKAY AMERICA: Lew Ayres and Maureen O'Sul- 
livan — Ayres is a hot shot reporter in this one. He 
acts as a go-between for a kidnap gang. Did a good 
business, but people don't like to see the star get 
killed at the end of a picture. Running time, 78 min- 
utes.— J. E. Courter, Courier Theatre, Gallatin, Mo. 
General patronage. 

RADIO PATROL: Robert Armstrong. Lila Lee- 
Very entertaining program picture, full of action and 
suspense. Drew only fairly well but only because 
there is very httle money in this section. — Mrs. 
Edith M. Fordyce, Princess Theatre, Selma, La. 
General patronage. 

THE STOWAWAY: Fay Wray, Leon Waycoi?— 
No names in the cast that mean a thing. Very weak 
in directing and story also. The actors give ama- 
teur performances that make it a very poor picture. 
Not worth running.— A. E. Hancock, Columbia 
Theatre, Columbia City, lud. Small town patronage. 



World Wide 



SIGN OF THE FOUR: Arthur Wontner— Good pic- 
ture. Poor sound. Not so hot at the box office. — N. 
S. Tronslin, Menlo Theatre, Menlo Park, Cal. Family 
patronage. 

Short Features 
Columbia 

BIRTH OF JAZZ: Krazy Kat— A good musical 
cartoon.— Cecil Ward, Roxy Theatre, Martinsville, Va. 
Small town patronage. 

CHAIN GANG; (cartoon)— Another good cartoon. 
The music is fine and always pleases both kids and 
adults. Running time, 8 minutes.— S. H. Rich, Rich 
Theatre, Montpelier, Idaho. Rural patronage. 

KRAZY KAT: Better than average cartoon com- 
edies.— H. J. Brown, Majestic Theatre, Nampa, Idaho. 
Small town patronage. 

LIGHTHOUSE KEEPING: Krazy Kat Cartoon- 
One of the best.— L. G. Tewksbury, Opera House, 
Stonington, Maine. Small town patronage. 

MICKEY'S ORPHANS: Mickey Mouse-Splendid 
cartoon. Would be fine to run Christmas week. 7 
minutes. — Mrs. Edith M. Fordyce, Princess Theatre, 
Selma, La. Small town patronage. 

SOLDIEJl OLD' MAN: Krazy Kat— Good cartoon.— 
Cecil Ward, Roiy Theatre, Martinsville, Va. Small 
town patronage. 



Educational 



BILLBOARD GIRL: Bing Crosby— Our first Crosby 
comedy, but it won't be our last. He was well liked. 
—A. N. Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. 
Small town patronage. 

A FOOL ABOUT WOMEN: Andy Clyde— They 
tried to make a slap-stick. The story could not 
happen even if you had a fertile imagination. — Gerald 
Stettmund, H. & S. Theatre, Chandler, Okla. Small 
town patronage. 

FOR THE LOVE OF LUDWIG: Andy Qyde— 
Splendid comedy with plenty of laughs, containing a 
kiddy review that makes it more entertaining than 
ever. Running time, 20 minutes. — Mrs. Edith M. 
Fordyce, Princess Theatre, Selma, La. Small town 
patronage. 

FREAKS OF THE DEEP: Strange deep water 
fish and how they are caught make this a most 
absorbing novelty reel. — A. N. Miles, Eminence Thea- 
tre, Eminence, Ky. Small town patronage. 

MEDLEY OF RIVERS: Nice colored scenic with 
beautiful music. Running time, 10 minutes. — J. G. 
Estee, S. T. Theatre, Parker, S. D. Small town 
patronage. 

OFF HIS BASE:' Gleason Sport Featurettes— A 
fair comedy. 2 reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family 
Theatre, Greenville, Mich. Small town patronage. 

SHIP A-HOOEY: Glen Tryon, Bobby Vernon— 
Very good comedy. Running time. 20 minutes. — Mrs. 



Edith M. Fordyce, Princess Theatre, Selma, La. 
Small town patronage. 

SMART WORK: Billy Dooley— A very good com- 
edy. — A. N. Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. 
Small town patronage. 

STRANGE BIRDS: This is in natural col9r and 
most interesting. The parrot who talks and sings is 
extra good. If you want a good novelty reel, use 
this one. — A. N. Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, 
Ky. Small town patronage. 



RKO Radio 



Fox 



BIG GAME OF THE SEA: Magic Carpet Series- 
Excellent shots of deep sea whaling and believe our 
people like these educational subjects. Running time, 
9 minutes. — Horn & Morgan, Inc., Star Theatre, Hay 
Springs, Neb. Small town patronage. 

MAGIC CARPET SERIES: These travelogues are 
good. — S. H. Rich, Rich Theatre, Montpelier, Idaho. 
Rural patronage. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

ANY OLD PORT: Laurel and Hardy— Extra good 
comedy. — Robert K. Yancey, Paradise Theatre, Cotter, 
Ark. Railroad and general patronage. 

BIRTHDAY BLUES: Our Gang-^Another swell 
Our Gang comedy. — Cecil Ward, Majestic Theatre, 
Martinsville, Va. Small town patronage. 

BLOCKS^AND TACKLES: A good football short, 
showing most of scenes in slow motion. — Cecil Ward, 
Roxy Theatre, Martinsville, Va. Small towm patron- 
age. 

COUNTY HOSPITAL: Laurel and Hardy— Good 
for several laughs. — Robert K. Yancey, Paradise 
Theatre, Cotter, Ark. Railroad and general patron- 
age. 

GIRL GRIEF: Charley Chase— Very good comedy, 
with plenty laughs. Charley as a bashful music 
teacher in college with a gang of girls. You can 
guess the rest. Running time, 19 minutes. — Cecil 
Ward, Roxy Theatre, Martinsville, Va. Small town 
patronage. 

MOSCOW;. HEART OF RUSSIA: Good travel pic- 
ture. Running time, 10 minutes. — Cecil Ward, Roxy 
Theatre, Martinsville, Va. Small town patronage. 

NOW WE'LL TELL ONE: Charley Chase— A very 
funny comedy. Better than the average. Two reels. 
— Bert Silver, Silver Family Theatre, Greenville, 
Mich. Small town patronage. 

THE OLD BULL: Zasu Pitts, Thelma Todd— One 
continuous scream which should be given half your 
advertising space. Will draw them to the box office. 
— Robert K. Yancey. Paradise Theatre, Cotter, Ark. 
Railroad and general patronage. 

OLD SPANISH CUSTOM: Spanish bull-fighting, 
showing training and real fighting. Good. — Cecil 
Ward, Roxy Theatre, Martinsville, Va. — Small town 
patronage. 

OLD SONGS FOR NEW: Act in colors. This is 
one of the best band acts we have ever played, with 
plenty old fashion music, and laughs. Running time. 
9 minutes. — Robert Wygant, Heights Theatre, Hous- 
ton, Texas. 



Paramount 



AIN'T SHE SWEET: Lillian Roth— Clever cartoon 
— Orris F. Collins, Capitol Theatre, Paragould, Ark. 
General Patronage. 

BETTY BOOP CARTOONS: These are nearly all 
good. We use them all and little Betty is getting 
as well known as Mickey Mouse. — A. N. Miles. 
Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. Small town pat- 
ronage. 

BETTY BOOP'S KER-CHOO: Betty Boop— Very 
amusing cartoon. — Cecil Ward, Roxy Theatre, Mar- 
tinsville. Va. Small town patronage. 



Ticket Machine Bargains 

TRADE-IN-VALUES 

AUTOMATIC GOLD SEAL 



And 



SIMPLEX TICKET REGISTERS 

Good as New . . . 
Mechanically Perfect 

As Low As ^^50^ 

Bonded Guarantee of Responsibility 



TIC KET REGISTER CORP. 



1600 BROADWAY NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Phone: CHickering 4—6810 



BARNYARD BUNK: Tom and Jerry cartoon— A 
very good cartoon. One reel. — Bert Silver, Silver 
Family Theatre, Greenville, Mich. Small town pat- 
ronage. 

CAT'S CANARY: (cartoon)— How a cat swallows 
a canary and could only sing instead of "meow" 
afterwards, is one of the cleverest ideas yet in the 
cartoons. If you have this bought, play it up. — 
A. N. Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. 
Small town patronage. 

FIREHOUSE HONEYMOON: Harry Sweet Com- 
edies — Silly, just two reels of wasted film. — Gerald 
Stettmund, H. & S. Theatre, Chandler, Okla. Small 
town patronage. 

FISH FELATHERS: Edgar Kennedy— Just flair. 
Running time, 18 minutes. — Orris F. Collins, Capitol 
Theatre, Paragould, Ark. General patronage. 

THE ICEMAN'S BALL: Qark and McCullough— 
A funny comedy. These old timers always make 
good. Two reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family Theatre, 
Greenville, Mich. Small town patronage. 

MANY A SLIP: Chic Sale— Sale not popular here. 
His brand of humor doesn't seem to get over. — A. N. 
Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. Small town 
patronage. 

MICKEY'S BUSY DAY: Mickey McGuire— Best 
comedy in a long time. — Robert K. Yancey, Paradise 
Theatre, Cotter, Ark. Railroad and general patron- 
age. 



United Artists 



TREVES AND FLOWERS: Great stuff. Associate 
with Mickey Mouse in your advertising. Disney 
should change the Silly Symphony name. He should 
think of one hundred million spectators when he re- 
names. — H. J. Brown, Majestic Theatre, Nampa, 
Idaho. Small town patronage. 

Universal 

BOYS WILL BE BOYS: Frank Albertson— A very 
good comedy. Two reels — Bert Silver, Silver Family 
Theatre, Greenville, Mich. Swall town patronage. 

THE CROWD SNORES: Pooch the Pup— These 
are always good. Running time, 7 minutes. — Horn & 
Morgan, Inc., Star Theatre, Hay Springs, Neb. 
Small town patronage. 

HESITATING LOVE : Louise Fazenda— Better than 
average for Louise. Our patronage is not too crazy 
about her, thinking her silly. Running time, Zl 
minutes. — Horn & Morgan, Inc., Star Theatre, Hay 
Springs, Neb. Small town patronage. 

A HOLLYWOOD HANDICAP: Very good comedy. 
20 minutes. — Mrs. Edith M. Fordyce, Princess Thea- 
tre, Selma, La. Small town patronage. 

A HOLLYWOOD HANDICAP: Here is a dandy 
comedy with a dozen leading Hollywood stars. — S. H. 
Rich, Rich Theatre, Montpelier, Idaho. Rural pat- 
ronage. 

OFFICER SAVE MY CHILD: Slim Summerville— 
It's the same old story every time. Summerville is 
wonderful in such feature plays as "Tom Brown of 
Culver" and "Air Mail," but people are getting tired 
of his comedies. Running time, 19 minutes. — Horn & 
Morgan, Inc., Star Theatre, Hay Springs, Neb. 
Small town patronage. 

STRANGE AS IT SEEMS: Always extra good.— 
Horn & Morgan, Inc., Star Theatre, Hay Springs, 
Neb. Small town patronage. 



Warner Vitaphone 



BELIEVE IT OR NOT: (Robert L. Ripley)— We 
like every one of this series and always call special 
attention to them in our ads and on screen. — A. N. 
Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. Small town 
patronage. 

BOSKO'S DOG RACE: Extra good cartoon for 
kids as well as adults enjoyed it. — A. N. Miles, 
Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. Small town pat- 
ronage. 

MAYBE I'M WRONG: Richy Craig. Jr.— Just a 
comedy. Nothing to rave about. Two reels. — Bert 
Silver, Silver Family Theatre, Greenville, Mich. 
Small town patronage. 



Serials 
Mascot 



LIGHTNING WARRIOR: A good serial. Running 
on Saturdays and helps business a lot. Everyone 
seems to like it from the clapping and shouting. 

Photography and recording is very bad. Twelve 
chapters. — Cecil Ward, Rexy Theatre, Martinsville, 
Va. Small town patronage. 

HURRICANE EXPRESS: Shiriey Grey, John 
Wayne, Tully Marshall— One of _ the best serials we 
ever ran. 12 episodes. — Bert Silver, Silver Family 
Theatre, Greenville, Mich. Small town patronage. 



Universal 



AIR MAIL MYSTERY: James Flavin, Lucille 
Browne — This serial increased my business 50% and 
pleased. — Robert K. Yancey, Paradise Theatre, Cotter, 
Ark. Railroad and general patronage. 




IRENE DUNNE 
PHILLIPS HOLMES 



"THE LADY" IS 
BOX-OFFICE! 

The ad writers of M-G^M are 
busy on a showman-ad campaign 
for a talkie youll hear plenty 
about. (One of the artist's roughs 
is shown above.) Based on Martin 
Brown's stage hit and brimful of 
the romance, laughs and tears 
that made " Smilin' Through '' 
such a success. It's well worth 
watching for! 



*'Trip gaily 
on to next 
page" 




58 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3i, 1932 






ROUND TA 

international association of showmen meeting weekly 
in MOTION PICTURE HERALD for mutual aid and progress 

CHARLES E. f CiilCli^') LEWIS, cbairmast mm^ editor 




A NEW YEAR AND A NEW DEAL! 



EVERY TIME WE EMBARK upon the mysterious voyage 
of a new year it seems to be customary for each and 
every one of us to make up a batch of perfectly good 
resolutions, turn over a ream or two of new leaves and in 
general promise (or kid) ourselves into believing that we 
will never do anything that is not entirely on the up and up. 

And, every time the New Year rolls around it is also 
customary for some dozen or two to solve the problems 
of the whole industry, regardless of how much or how little 
they know about it. So, taking advantage of the season and 
the freedom of the press, we'll offer our own solution for 
the ills of theatre operation insofar as it concerns the house 
manager. 

FOR THREE SOLID YEARS we have sat in this spot and 
kept in close touch with conditions all over the country, 
especially the salary, budget and overhead slashing which 
all too often rebounded and cost the cutters far more than 
it cost the managers. For three years we have watched 
executives In home offices practice the most astonishing 
form of economy and long-distance theatre operating and 
wondered just how long It could continue before the tail 
would start wagging the dog. 

To relate some of the things that have happened to such 
circuits and executives would be rehashing old stories which 
have gone the rounds so often that they are now too stale. 

BUT, STRANGE TO TELL— or maybe not so strange at 
that — the funny practices continue and still the swivel chair 
gents are as far from the solution as when they started; 
only they are much poorer and much more worried. 

We honestly believe that we can make a suggestion that 
will come a darned sight nearer the goal than any so far 
advanced, and risking the wrath of ttie powers that be we 
offer, for the benefit of those who are still capable of 
sensing a new slant, the following: 

A BKAbiTy NEW DEAL FOR THE MANAGER! 

IN ADDITION TO THE present insufficient salary now 
being paid to the man charged with the responsibility of 
operating expensive theatre properties, the theatre owners 
shall permit him to draw a sum of between five and ten per 
cent of the net profits. Whatever the percentage agreed 
upon, there must be no double-crossing on either side of 



the fence. Owners must not pad the overhead or charge 
unreasonable sums against administration expenses, or 
charge the house exorbitant salaries for themselves. 

On the other hand, the manager must operate the the- 
atre as economically as is consistent with good showmanship 
and in keeping with the type of house he is managing. Set- 
ting a set overhead Is the happiest medium providing it is 
a fair figure and one that would prompt the various man- 
agers to try to top week in and week out. 

THE ONLY DANGER to this plan will develop among 
^those theatre owners who have the unhappy faculty of 
welching on an understanding. They will try to do just 
that — or worse — just as soon as they see their theatres 
starting to make some real money. They may soon forget 
the past lean years and the worry that went with them 
and they will probably have mighty little compunctions 
about letting the manager have what he is justly en- 
titled to. 

You may well ask: "Is this an experiment?" IT IS NOT. 
It is a plan already in practice In some half dozen situations 
that we personally know of and has spurred the managers on 
to such extra effort that theatres under this plan have climbed 
slowly, but steadily, out of the red and into profits. Never 
have these managers been so happy, so anxious and so 
conscientious. You can easily understand why such fine 
spirit and loyalty should exist. These fortunate showmen 
are finding themselves for the first time perhaps, in a posi- 
tion to look a little ahead and save a few dollars. 

WE'LL STAKE OUR LAST cent that if two groups of the- 
atres were to line up against each other, one under the old 
chiseling system of salary cutting, meddling supervision 
and worries, and the other under the plan advanced here, 
whereby a manager Is vested with the full authority so 
essential to proper management, left to work out his own 
problems and then allowed to share In the success of his 
efforts, that the latter group would leave the other so far 
behind that you'd soon lose sight of them altogether. 

Conditions being what they are, you may say that I'm 
all wrong. Well, after all, so many others have been wrong 
that the least you can do is to let me be wrong for a 
change and see what happens. "C HICK" 



TRUE TALK AT THE SMITHS 

MR. S.: ^1 see that HELEN HAYES has been voted the 
greatest screen actress of the year/' 

MRS* S*: "She was wonderful in The Sin of Madelon 

Claudet' . . . her new picture ^Son Daughter' opens 
Friday ♦ • . we mustn't miss it!" 

MISS S*: "I just read that she is to star in a picture based 

on THE WHITE SISTER; " 

CHORUS: "That's one picture all the Smiths in America* 

will see!" 



'22,483,015 Smiths! ^^^^ (on the way 

to next page) 




60 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, I 932 



DICK KIRSCHBAUM'S LOBBY LAFFS! 



Your guess is as 
good as ours on 
what the Master 
Magician is go- 
ing to pull out 
of the 1933 hat. 
. . . Maybe white 
rabbits, maybe 
not; maybe a lot 
of good news 
for all of us. 
Anyway, lets all 
give a rousing 
cheer for the 
New Year! 




LORENCE DOING GOOD 
WORK AT STRAND AND 
CATARACT IN NIAGARA 

When smart showmen meet they say 
something generally happens. We refer to a 
connection formed some time ago between 
the Brothers Skouras and Herman Lorence. 
which resulted in the latter being made 
manager of the Strand and Cataract The- 
atres, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 'Twas rather 
tough going when the energetic Herman 
first arrived on the scene, but hard work 
and logical thought and action have brought 
about improved conditions. Let's see what 
he has been doing. 

On "Smilin' Through" he pulled a fast 
one between the hours of midnight and 8 
A. M. by stenciling "Go Smiling Through 
to the Strand" on 200 street corners. And 
did he catch hell from the city boss and 
did he wiggle out of the jam ! Go ahead — 
sue him ! 

He combed the entire neighborhood for 
all the trunks it could yield and piled them 
high in a stake-body moving van to exploit 
"Pack Up Your Troubles." The driver was 
dressed in a soldier's uniform. Both truck 
and driver looked like the tail end of the 
Battle of Bull Run, it is reliably reported, 
but commanded plenty of attention. 

On "Rain" the 24-sheet was used for a 
cut-out across the marquee. The ingenious 
Lorence then placed the rain pipe over the 
top and turned on the water. That evening 
it rained as it hadn't rained in a long time. 
So what? Anyway, the gag helped matters 
along. 

Another move that made rival exhibitors 
turn green with envy and him one of the 
immortals of showbusiness was a stunt on 
"Red Dust," when 100 pounds of sand was 
colored red and mixed with glue to identify 



trails to the theatre. It is not reported that 
the mixture stuck to the shoes of any of 
the good citizens, but what if it did? All 
the more publicity. 

And so it goes with Lorence at Niagara. 
Now he's putting on prologues with each 
first half picture and so far hasn't spent a 
cent for talent. He and the organist dig 
it from midnight auditions. Lighting ef- 
fects by Lorence ; music by Miss Taylor. 
And what a combination ! 

If our Niagara representative can steal 
a few moments from the 16 to 20 hours 
he's putting in each day to keep his charges 
in the running, we'll promise to publish 
more of these disturbing incidents in his 
life. Till then -we bid him and his fellow 
Club members adieux, with the sincere 
wish that his assault against the elements 
of Niagara meet with continued success. 



FRISCH AND RINZLER 
AGAIN COME THROUGH 
WITH FOOD FOR POOR 

For the third consecutive season Louis 
Frisch and Samuel Rinzler, heads of the 
Randforce Circuit, Brooklyn, N. Y., as- 
sisted the poor and needy of Brooklyn and 
Queens by staging their Annual Free Food 
Matinee. Newspapers, several charitable 
organizations and the untiring efforts of 
managers of thirty-odd theatres cooperated 
to make the event an outstanding success. 
To Monty MacLevy, former manager of 
the Savoy Theatre and publicity director 
of the circuit, now general manager of the 
Round Table Circuit, Long Island, goes a 
major portion of credit for bringing the 
affair to a successful conclusion. 

More than 40,000 school children, after 
making requests to parents to donate food- 
stufifs in lieu of their admission to the the- 



atres, stormed the circuit houses on the 
stated day. Throughout the afternoon 
groups arrived bearing in their arms all 
manner of canned goods, vegetables and 
other eatables, to be admitted to view com- 
plete shows. When all was accounted for 
some 40 tons of provender was on hand, 
with an approximate valuation of $25,000. 
Leading the list were pork and beans; next 
came thousands of cans of tomato soup, 
followed by such articles as rice, milk, all 
sorts of vegetables, etc. 

As to gratitude, Protestant, Jew and 
Catholic enthusiastically voiced thanks 
through neighborhood welfare organiza- 
tions and by direct letters to theatre man- 
agers and circuit headquarters at the Savoy. 
Frisch and Rinzler are in line for congratu- 
lations for sponsoring such a worthy move, 
as are their supervisors and managers for 
their part in the undertaking. 



KEN WARD MANAGES 
TO KEEP HIS HOUSE 
ON THE FRONT PAGE 

We see by the papers that Kenneth 
Ward, manager of the Rex Theatre, Sum- 
ter, S. C, among other things, acted as 
host to the City Fire Department, pulled 
a "Zombie" bravery stunt and promoted 
a full page co-op ad, to say nothing of con- 
structing a handsome front for his theatre. 

Kenneth tempted the jaded appetites of 
the fire crew and a number of invited 
friends with something new on Sumter 
menus — rattlesnake chops, whatever they 
are, and the innovation rated a two-column 
story on the front page. A good old 
chicken stew helped mollify his guests after 
identity of the side-dish was disclosed. 

Another story contains the information 
that a shrinking little violet of Sumter's 
feminine element witnessed unattended a 
midnight showing of "White Zombie" with- 
out making any noise except that of open- 
ing her purse when Kenneth awarded her 
a $5 croix de guerre for distinguished 
bravery. There were lots of competitors for 
the chance to sit through the lone perform- 
ance but Moore exercised his keen eye for 
feminine charm when making the selection. 

He tied in the mis-spelled word gag 
when promoting the full page co-op ad on 
"Down to Earth." The title made a good 
one for "Down to Earth" prices and 
"Quality Up-Prices Down" catchlines and 
the merchants came through like a lot of 
good soldiers, not forgetting to let Ken- 
neth place his good-sized display ad right 
in the centre of the page. 

The illustration shows a front he con- 




structed for "Smilin' Through," which to 
our way of thinking, is well nigh perfect 
for an open-faced lobby such as has the 
Rex. Note the attractive picket fence effect, 
foliage and the two arched entrances. It 
carried out the scheme of the gate sequence 
in the picture. 

That's all for this time from Ward, the 
Rex and Sumter. 



"TAKE OFF YOUR 
WHISKERS! We know 
you, Lionel Barrymore!" 




With his magnificent per- 
formance in "Rasputin and 
The Empress'' immortally 
recorded on film, this great 
actor begins work on a bril- 
liant original story — one of 
the most unusual roles ever 
developed at the M-G-M 
studios, Title to he announced. 




IN "GRAND HOTEL" 
IN "ARSENE LUPIN" 
IN "WASHINGTON 

MASQUERADE" 
In every picture in 
which he appears, 
Lionel Barry more sets 
for himself a new 
high standard 
of acting! 



"Of course f 
there's more 
on next page" 

1 (P 




62 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, I 932 



LOUIS LAMM FOUND 
STREET STUNTS AID 
ON THREE PICTURES 

Recent campaign activities of Louis 
Lamm, manager of the Capitol Theatre, 
Elyria, Ohio, tie-ups with the Legion and 
a transportation company and a stunt on 
"Grand Hotel." 

The accompanying photo practically tells 
the story of the tie-up made with the 
American Legion on "Brown of Culver," 
in which a special show was designated as 
Legion Night. Members of the local post, 
followed by seventy-five Junior Patrol 
Boys of Elyria schools, paraded through 
the streets en route to the theatre and pro- 
vided plenty of publicity. 

For "One Way Passage" he formed a 
tie-up with a local bus concern to give 
patrons a free one-way ride to the theatre 
during the three-day engagement of the 
picture. Coupons published in the news- 
papers two days in advance of showing 
were accepted in lieu of cash by the bus 
drivers. 

Effective publicity was given "Grand 
Hotel" by having a boy, dressed as a bell- 



Sh 



owman s 



Calendar" 



JANUARY 



8fh 
1 0th 

nth 



BaHle of New Orleans— 1815 
Francis X. Bushman's Birthday 

Alex'ai^er Hamilton Born — 
1757 

Chester Conklln's Birthday 




hop, pass out cards at prominent street 
intersections. Copy on the cards carried 
names in cast, with invitation for bearers 
to "spend two hours with them in 'Grand 
Hotel' — first time at popular prices." 

We're always glad to hear from one of 
the Lamm Brothers of Ohio, for both 
Louis and Julius generally have some good 
stunts to pass along the line. This time 
thanks are in order for the former. We'll be 
telling you more about his work in a future 
issue. 



WHEELER'S STUNT IS 
ADAPTABLE TO MOST 
ANY COLLEGE THEME 

A stunt which C. W. Wheeler, manager 
of the Tokay Theatre, South Bend, Ind., 
used on "Hold 'Em Jail" ought to work 
out equally well on any football or college 
picture. 

There are four high schools in his county 
and Wheeler offered cash awards to the 
students in all of them for the best "yell" 
containing "Hold 'Em Jail," the decision 
to be made by the school assemblies. On 
opening night of the picture the winners 
from each school appeared on the stage to 
give the "yells," typewritten slides of 
which were thrown on the screen. The 
winner was judged by audience applause. 

Wheeler offers a post yell-stunt sugges- 
tion that the judges make the award on the 
basis of the way it is put over, for reason 
that one of the schools was situated in his 
town and its representative received a far 
better break than the others. However, it 
did help put the picture over. 



12th Jack London born — 1876 

13th Kay Francis' Birthday 

14th Bebe Daniels' Birthday 

16th Harry Carey's Birthday 

17th Benjamin Franklin Born — 1705 

Nils Asther's Birthday 

18th Daniel Webster Born— 1782 

19th R. E. Lee Born— 1807 

21st Stonewall Jaclcson Born — 1824 

22nd Conrad Veidt's Birthday 

23rd Ralph Graves' Birthday 

John Hancock Born — 1737 
Raymond Griffith's Birthday 

24th Jack Hoxie's Birthday 

29th William McKinley Born— 1843 

30th Chinese New Year (D.E.I.) 

Greta Nissen's Birthday 

31st Tailulah Bankhead's Birthday 



FEBRUARY 

1st Clark Gable's Birthday 

U. S. Flag Raised in Hawaii — 
1893 

Ground Hog Day 

2nd Benny Rubin's Birthday 

3rd Woodrow Wilson's Death — 

1924 

Horace Greeley Born — 1811 
Mendelssohn (German Com- 
poser) Born 

4th Col. Lindbergh's Birthday — 

1904 

Massachusetts Ratified U. S. 
Constitution — 1788 
Ramon Novarro's Birthday 
Aaron Burr Born — 1756 
Walter Catlett's Birthday 



A FEW NOTES ABOUT 
WALTER MORRIS AND 
HIS CAROLINA HOUSE 

The last time we reported on the activi- 
ties of Walter Morris, manager of the 
Broadway Theatre, Charlotte, N. C, we 
outlined the fine campaign he made on 
"Fugitive." Prior to this, however, he and 
his staff turned out an attractive front on 
"Cabin in the Cotton," a photo of which we 
are showing herewith. You will note that 
the entije entrance was boarded up to re- 
semble the exterior of a cabin. The center 
window was used by the cashier, while the 
windows at either side made excellent 
frames for a variety of stills. 

A copy of the High School bi-weekly 
newspaper discloses that Walter tied-up 
with the students and football players for 
an old-time Rally Night on occasion of 
showing "All American." Official autos 
and a band formed the vanguard of a parade 
of students and players en route from school 
to theatre. The band and football squad 
were guests but the student body paid (thank 
goodness, observes Walter) and furnished 
plenty of publicity and ballyhoo. The school 
paper carried the story on the front page 
under a streamer head. 

Other activities in Charlotte include 
formation of "The Jester's Club," an or- 
ganization composed of representatives from 
all branches of show business in the city, 
and the Broadway Theatre's Bosco Club, 
sponsored by a chain store company. The 
former will function as a social, fraternal 
and charitable body while the latter is a 
move aimed at promotion of goodwill and 
sales for both theatre and stores. The chain 




stores company is spending a considerable 
amount of cash to blanket the city with 
bread inserts, newspaper and window ad- 
vertising. 

Morris' activities are, as usual, interest- 
ing to us and his fellow Round Tablers. He 
gets around, does Walter, and does things 
that keep the name of the theatre he's con- 
nected with in the limelight. We'll hope 
to tell you more later about his tie-up with 
the chain-store concern, proving that cost 
of a large campaign can be promoted with 
a little effort. 



Is This a "Ride"? 

Eddie Golden, of the New Olympic The- 
atre, Pittsburgh, Pa., advises us via post 
card that he simply couldn't resist passing 
word along "that if managers want to do 
business on 'Tiger Shark' to cater to Cath- 
olics and play it on Friday (fish day)." 
He did, says Eddie, and packed 'em in. 
Further details are lacking. Figfure this 
one out yourselves ! 



WHY DIDNT WE THINK OF 
THIS BEFORE! 

Every so often an inspirational teaming of players 
happens that makes us say ^^Why didn't we think 
of that before?'' One reason is we didn't have a story 
like this one. But now we've got it — and you'll 
give out cheers! 

KEATON-DURANTE-COOPER in m g-M s BUDDIES 

( — still going strong on next page) 



64 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, I 932 



KEEPING UP WITH THE TIMES 



By GUY JONES 



What's good for 
the goose ought 
to be good for 
the gander but 
$7 seems to be 
a lot of dough 
on this fellow's 
weekly budget. 
Anyway, the big 
shot's telling him 
how to put over 
a hot stunt. 



i ^0\N'\fVOU\N0RKTH/^7- 
I cT\3ViT'\T5 BOUND To 

^ ?\^\k^ouR HOUSE tak£ 

^^Q^UKCH WEEK-. 
Lv\iKSnDID ON ^Li. 



^^^.m GREAT 6|//y/ 

^55AT WOULD cost' 
^cMtWDOLURS A 

5TUNJ// 




CALDWELL AGAIN PUT 
OVER FINE CAMPAIGN 
ON "HOTEL" PICTURE 

Judging from past observations of his 
work, we could have told you all long ago 
that Wally Caldwell, manager of Loew's 
Valentine Theatre, Toledo, Ohio, would put 
over a big campaign on "Grand Hotel" and 
data at hand justifies our convictions. The 
usual, excellent Caldwell tie-ups, assuring 
wide coverage among various merchants, 
together with displays, newspaper campaign, 
free space, etc., are all in evidence. 

The small cut on this page shows one of 
the attractive windows he secured as the 
result of a tie-up made with a big depart- 
ment store located in the heart of the city. 
Cutout "Grand Hotel" star heads were used 
as a background, with 14 by 17 de luxe 
colored star stills studded throughout the 
display. A large theatre card was devoted 
entirely to attraction and exclusive engage- 
ment. 

Another tie-up made with a Macy-owned 
department store netted him 26-inch cooper- 
ative display advertisements in morning and 
evening newspapers, plus a display in the 
book department on the main floor. An- 
nouncement cards were read by the hun- 
dreds who patronize the huge dining room 
daily. 

His windows included the placing of seven 
large oil paintings, prominently displayed, 
in downtown and west side stores ; display 
of mounted 11 by 14's in special downtown 
locations ; Postal Telegraph messenger cut- 
outs in choice vacant stores, and a double 
set of "Grand Hotel" star stills with copy 
in an exclusive women's shoe store. 

Additional effort included a tie-up with 
a leading hotel for a 10-inch display ad, 
plus paper books of matches with "Grand 
Hotel" stickers in all rooms and in coffee 
shop; the distribution by ushers of 5,000 
Edison matches at prominent corners in the 



city during lunch hour and in well known 
stores ; use of a one-sheet in the main en- 
trance of another well known hotel; distri- 
bution of 200-sheet tack cards in all sections 
of the city and downtown parking spaces, 
and the distribution of 10,000 Loew's News 
in parked cars, laundry bundles and through 
residential sections. 

All advertising, exploitation, etc., stressed 
the "exclusive run" of the picture and ex- 
clusive policy trailers were shown with cur- 
rent picture and coming attraction preview. 
As usual, Wally saw that the newspapers 
gave the regular quota of readers, special 
stories, etc. 

Radio Stunt 

A stunt called "Whispering Password," 
put over with the help of a local radio sta- 
tion, was instrumental in bringing about a 
lot of favorable publicity. Each night the 
radio station invited five of its listeners-in 
to witness the picture by writing a men- 
tioned password, their name and address, 
on a card for presentation at the cashier's 
window. Five other "passwords" were men- 
tioned for the next five days. 




The marquee of the theatre was decorated 
with American flag clusters at each end ; 
streamers and garlands were run to the 



roof; two 12-foot "Grand Hotel" plus, gold 
lettered drapes were tied to the bottom guy 
lines ; large, transparent "exclusive show- 
ing" drapes were used on all sides of the 
marquee ; star cutout heads were studded 
in front lobbies, together with special one 
and three-sheet poster boards, and oil paint- 
ings were spotted at advantageous locations 
in the foyer. 

It's easy to conclude that Caldwell is still 
going about his work in the same old ag- 
gressive way, even when he has a strong 
attraction like "Grand Hotel." However, 
he has established a reputation out in To- 
ledo for keeping Loew's Valentine up to 
the front and he doesn't necessarily lay down 
when a film comes along that needs but little 
pushing to get the desired results. We'll tell 
you more about Wally 's work just as soon 
as we receive further news. 



REESE BUILDING UP 
TRADE BY PLUGGING 
KIDDIE PATRONAGE 

Believing that matinees for the young- 
sters account for revenue both from that 
source and adults who accompany them, 
W. Horace Reese, manager of the Spruce 
Theatre, one of the Harry Hirsch neigh- 
borhood houses in Philadelphia, makes a 
strong bid for kiddie patronage. 

One of his methods of building kiddie 
trade is the "Free Show Club," whereby a 
bearer of a membership card provided with 
six punch-marks becomes entitled to see 
the seventh show free of charge. This same 
gag has also been used to hold up interest 
in the several chapters of a serial. 

Popularity of "Lucky Bucks Play Money" 
with the children in his neighborhood also 
gave Reese an idea to capture attention 
from the youngsters. It appears that most 
of the Sunday papers print this "play- 
money" in a number of denominations and 
that the kids barter it among their gangs 
at the rate of one cent in cash per hundred 
"Bucks" for use in a variety of games and 
enterprises of their own invention. So Reese 
prints a somewhat similar bill on his 
heralds and other throw-aways with the 
greeting: "Hey Kids! Here's 50 Bucks for 
Your Bankroll— Extra ! 100 Bucks Next 
Week — Don't Miss It." Copy pertaining 
to theatre and attraction is included on the 
play-money. He also adapts his heralds, 
etc. to the guest ticket scheme so that the 
bills will be kept instead of being thrown 
away. Announcements of those to receive 
passes are posted in the lobby. 

Reese is doing a lot of interesting ex- 
ploitation work in his neighborhood and 
now that he has joined the list of active 
contributors to this department we'll hope 
to tell you all a lot more about what's going 
on in showbusiness down his way. 



Quaint Custom, Quaint Tie-Up! 

The quaint custom of collecting matchbook 
covers is being capitalized upon by Warner- 
First National in mapping the campaign 
on "Match King." Strange as it may seem 
to some it appears there are a considerable 
number of entirely sane people who make 
it a hobby to collect an assortment of these 
bits of pasteboard. It is the idea of the 
exploitation wizards to present the "War- 
ren William Silver Cup," this year's annual 
award, to the matchbook cover collector who 
submits the most interesting collection to 
his local theatre. Need we say more ? 



JANUARY 



f M r w T p s 

I Z i A $^ 7 
8 9 It II (2 IJ H 

j5 li 17 tr It WW 
21 z» » K 11 » u 



FEBRUARY 



MAY 



$ H r w T F s 

7 I t A/ « /^ '> 

»/ » > t> H It » 
« J» 



S M T W T P S 
113 4 

r t 7 t t ><> » 
a i> /4 15 /t » 'J 

«» II M li M?$ 

It. Z> It - 



JUNE 



<> H T W T P S 
5^ > » t »* 

<r « <» f '* y 

/{ If t4 o » 2» 
^ t« )r7 t» t» M 



MARCH 

/I <■» It h' ttr 17 'f 

If 20 %l IX 2> Zf 29 
U J.J >» >l 



•if* T W T P S 

J 

u > t f t ^ i 

5 I* M It n Hr/f 
/» II ttfS 



APRI] 



5 Mr w T 



■ 

i ) S ? * T tr 

1 lf> It >l i^H Is 

li /> /{ «« u II 
»>^♦ If ifc t; 1', Z4 

JUL 



£ h T W T P S 

< V » f r 

CI 4 ^ 10 H It 

II; ><t " '» 




"Goodness 
gracious it's 
a SHORT 



YEAR!" 

Certainhjl It's an M-Q-M Short Year, 
thanks to Hal RoacKs De Luxe Comedies 
and M-Q-M^s Diversified Program Qems! 





STAN LAUREL 
OLIVER HARDY 



ZASU PITTS 
THELMA TODD 




OUR GANG 



TAXI BOYS 



(Dickie Moore, 
Spanky, Stymie 
and others.) 



CHARLIE 
CHASE 

ALSO M-G-M REVUES and HEARST METROTONE NEWS 



(Ben Blue, 
Billy Gilbert, 
}as. C. Morton 
arul others.) 



Look at Broadway 
During Holiday Week! 

RIVOLI 

THE TOY PARADE 

(M-G-M Oddities) 

CAPITOL 

RIO, THE MAGNIFICENT 

(Fitzpatrick Traveltalk) 

ROXY 

THE NURSEMAID 

{Flip, the Frog Cartoon) 

CHALK UP 

(Pete Smith Sport Champion) 

SHORTS 

— but sweet! 



(More on 
next page) 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD December 31, 1932 



ASK YOURSELF THIS QUESTION; 
"DO PEOPLE READ YOUR ADS? 



Here Is a Valuable Discussion 
On the Question of Adver- 
tising Copy and Its Various 
Merits and Mistakes! 

by EDWIN S. C. COPPOCK 

Managing Director, Staten Island Paramount 

ASK yourself this question. Maybe 
you have the right answer and per- 
haps you haven't. I didn't feel con- 
fident enough of my own precocity to make 
a decision so 1 sought the answer by 
means of a questionnaire. The result was 
somewhat surprising. Do people read? 

Article after article on the Round Table 
pages have brought about the general as- 
sumption that the newspaper is a theatre's 
finest advertising medium. 1 agree entirely 
but deplore the possible misuse of the me- 
dium. Picture for yourself the seriousness 
of a situation wherein money and profit 
totaling many times a manager's salary can 
be controlled by his personal knowledge 
and use of a medium. He receives his show 
prepared by a studio spending huge sums 
in research and talent. His theatre is com- 
fortable and adequately equipped. Yet 
through his own lack of perception all that 
expenditure may show a poor return. 

Seeking the Medium! 

In the questionnaire mentioned above I 
sought to find the medium that supplied 
motivation toward attendance at the the- 
atre. Eliminating the majority of the ques- 
tions and getting down to the point at hand 
brings up the matter of the average patron's 
selection of entertainment from the display 
advertising in newspapers. 

The spirit of competition and the self- 
admiration typical of all of us has brought 
about a peculiarly inadequate type of 
newspaper advertisement. Our uppermost 
thought has been flash, smash, shock and 
attention value. Haven't you held out at 
arms length a finished ad and smirked with 
admiration of your own artistic achieve- 
ment? Yes, it probably was a work of art. 
... so much so that business was lousy. 
People aren't reading a supposedly infor- 
mative newspaper ad to complete their ap- 
preciation of art. They don't know what 
the word "layout" means, but they are pros- 
pective patrons of your theatre seeking 
information to assist them in making a 
choice. I'm as guilty as anyone else. Sure, 
I've made ads that I thought would steal 
any page. Consequently coming down to 
earth about these things was a shock. 

There are lots of pictures that can be 
sold by the mention of title or star. But 
there are many times more that present a 
selling problem. No doubt there is some- 
thing within those pictures that is fine en- 
tertainment. You know it's good, but how 
are you going to tell your patrons. Your 
patron doesn't have the advantage of con- 
stant producer shock advertising in trade 
papers. He doesn't have a stack of press 
sheets cluttering up his home. He depends 
on what you say in a newspaper ad. 

In a community where the audience is 
largely made up of habitual patrons and not 



Adveiiising, because of its imporfance 
in show-selling, occupies the limelight of 
the Club section more frequently than any 
other medium. The reason is quite simple. 
The public has gradually grown more and 
more show-wise with the passing of years 
and as a consequence is shopping for 
its entertainment. What better or quicker 
method of shopping can it look to than 
newspaper advertising? So, just as the 
public is getting smart in reading theatre 
newspaper ads, the manager, too, has 
grown more intelligent in estimating the 
importance of this great selling medium. 

But all too often the manager in writ- 
ing his copy loses sight of many slants 
that must constantly be kept in mind while 
making up his ads. Mr. Coppock, a show- 
man of many years' experience, understands 
the subject well enough to pass along these 
brief thoughts in the hope that other man- 
agers will grasp their signficance and be 
guided accordingly. And we too hope that 
every member and reader will give due 
thought to what is said in this very timely 
and pertinent article. 

Other views, as we have often empha- 
sized, are more than welcome on this same 
subject. Surely there are dozens of men 
in showbusiness whose long years of theatre 
operation and advertising work qualifies 
them to express themselves on the better 
ways of making up ads or warning you 
of the pitfalls wherein good copy ideas 
stumble and emerge as wasted money and 
space. 

There is so much to be said on the bet- 
ter ways of making up ads, and so little 
has really been said, that we hope Mr. 
Coppock's efforts will result in many other 
articles from all over the country. 

"CHICK" 



transients, your advertising is a service. 
The questionnaire showed that the majority 
of people influenced at all by newspaper 
advertising read the entire ad, small type 
and all. They are shopping. Don't ask them 
to buy blindly. Describe this merchandise 
for which they are going to pay hard earned 
dollars. You are so close to this business 
that naturally you have a sense of values. 
You know before a picture comes to your 
theatre whether it's good or bad. You know 
the story ; you know the moral ; you know 
the parts each performer plays, etc. You 
get so close to the product that you uncon- 
sciously treat it as a known subject. Your 
patron doesn't have these advantages. Yet 
he is anxious to find out all he can. 

True enough, they read fan magazines. 
But what proportion of your audience reads 
them? A lot, to be sure, but not enough 
to pay your rent. Yesterday I spoke to 
a family about the picture "Payment De- 
ferred." I asked them if they had seen it. 
Their answer was that it sounded like a 
story about installment buying. Absurd, 
but true. Those of you who have seen the 
picture know that it is a very fine piece of 
work. But did the title tell enough for you 
to know what it was about before you saw 
the picture? 

Just Say Enough! 

Many an old showman has said, "Don't 
tell 'em too much. Nevertheless if you told 



There Is Always Sonnething 
New To Learn About News- 
paper Theatre Ads; Here 
Are Some Excellent Tips! 

them so much that they stayed away, bul 
believed your advertising, you have a better 
chance of getting them back into your the- 
atre. Did it ever occur to you that possibly 
your patrons are as smart as you are and 
that they resent misinformation and that 
they can't continually be tricked into buy- 
ing? In any community the difference be- 
tween profit and loss is the amount of 
habitual patronage. 

Patrons Are Choosy Today! 

People DO read. Those people that are 
careful in their selection of entertainment, 
particularly where a number of theatres, 
offer a wide choice, are the marginal income 
that may mean profit. Certainly it is better 
to do a job too well than incompletely. 
Give them pertinent copy not too full of 
superlatives. Stay away from the old stereo- 
typed phrases. Every picture isn't the great- 
est ever made but it probably has something, 
in it of value and interest. After the shock 
of finding from the questionnaire that 
patrons often stayed away and missed a 
picture they would have enjoyed merely 
because I had omitted in my ad copy facts 
that would have attracted them, I have tried 
to formulate a new plan of attack through 
the newspaper. 

1. Smaller and more meaningful il- 
lustrations. Fewer clinches. 

2. A headline that has punch that 
applies not to every picture, but to the 
one I'm selling. 

3. At least 20 words of descriptive 
copy. 

4. Listing a more complete cast. 

5. More white space for readability. 

6. Reduction in total display space. 

7. Elimination of general superla- 
tives. 

8. Adequate space and descriptive 
line for ALL short subjects. 

9. List starting times of feature. 

10. Address and phone number of 
theatre. 

Put away your conceit for a while. Don't 
try to outdue the other fellow in space. 
Make your ad easy to read by the elimina- 
tion of needless novelty design and art work. 
And above all things tell 'em plenty with 
copy. They'll read it. To prove it to your- 
self run a few tests as I had to do before I 
was convinced that flash meant very little. 

Ofifer a small premium written in small 
copy somewhere in the ad. Try a small 
story in the reader columns but BURIED. 
If that story mentions anything the people 
want they'll react. IN ANY COMMU- 
NITY WHERE THE MAJORITY OF 
THE PATRONAGE IS HABITUAL, 
THEY DO READ . . . NOT JUST 
HEADLINES, BUT ALL OF YOUR 
COPY. Can any man with self respect and 
pride in his profession deliberately neglect 
his business by negligence in a subject 
wherein the result may be the difference 
between profit and loss and where the extra 
cost is NOTHING, merely the realignment 
of material and space already used? 




( Ernest Truex, Una Merkel, Johnny Hines, etc.) 



The First of 5 Great Broadway 
Stage Successes captured for you 
by Metro -Goldwyn- Mayer I 



BROADWAY HIT No. 1: 

''Whistling in the Dark 

BROADWAY HIT No. 2: 

''Clear All Wires'' 

BROADWAY HIT No. 3: 

"Another Language'* 

BROADWAY HIT No. 4: 

"Men Must Fight" 

BROADWAY HIT No. 5: 

"Rendezvous". 




"It was a 
swell M-G-M 
New Year's 
party — let's 
have just 
one more — 
on next page'' 



68 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 



WE OFTEN WONDER! By lou sylvester 



Why not give 
4 Stars to the 
old dame for 
asking this em- 
barrassing ques- 
tion? 




^ vaHO sir, who is 

^:S^V^ '''' fM 



ABOUT THESE 
STAR RATINGS 




WILLIE AND KELLEY 
WON FIRST HONORS 
FOR BEST CAMPAIGN 

Basing their campaign on "use of some- 
thing different every day to obtain definite 
results," which included a blonde versus red 
head contest, de luxe give-aways, a free 
vacation trip, special nights and other stunts, 
Raymond Willie, manager of the Texas 
Theatre, San Antonio, and Bob Kelley, ad- 
vertising manager, came through to win 
first honors in the exploitation contest run 
several weeks ago by M-G-M on "Red 
Headed Woman." 

Newspaper Tied-in! 

The tie-up made with a local newspaper 
for a contest between red heads and blondes, 
based on the controversy caused by Jean 
Harlow dyeing her hair red, went over in a 
big way due to the whole-hearted support 
given the stunt by the paper. Tear sheets 
at hand bear evidence of the hundreds of 
inches of free space obtained by the theatre 
day after day during the campaign, includ- 
ing both straight stories and photos of the 
contestants. The award was an American 
Airways trip to Hollywood and return; a 
week at the Ambassador hotel there ; lunch- 
eon with the stars at the Paramount studio ; 
pictures made with stars, and a night dedi- 
cated to the winner at Cocoanut Grove. In 
addition to newspaper aid, this stunt was 
plugged over the radio, in lobby, in ads and 
on screen. 

On opening night a new Ford V-8, pro- 
moted from a local dealer and plugged in 
the usual fashion two weeks in advance, was 
given away. A special lobby and orchestra 
pit display of the give-away was arranged 
at both Paramount and Aztec Theatres, with 
display cards by each car announcing the 
tie-up and give-away. Other efifort in con- 
nection with the stunt included special radio 
announcements one week prior to give- 
away ; a "ballyhoo truck on the streets in 



residential and business districts one week 
in advance, with new Ford on appropriately 
bannered truck; large fire bell rung along 
the route followed by truck ; ballots passed 
out from truck, and the listing of the give- 
away on 40,000 heralds distributed house to 
house four days prior to opening. 

Willie and Kelley tied in with the local 
agent of a well known steamship line for 
the promotion of the three weeks' vacation 
trip to New York City and return to San 
Antonio, which included rail fare to Gal- 
veston and return ; all expenses paid while 
in New York, such as hotel, sightseeing 
jaunts, etc. The stunt was plugged two 
weeks in advance with a fine window dis- 
play, a screen trailer, lobby display and dis- 
tribution of 40,000 heralds and 75,000 of 
the usual paper accessories necessary to 
handle a stunt of this sort. This give-away 
was made the third night. 

The give-away of a large size Frigidaire 
was also promoted through a tie-up with a 
local dealer and award was made in the 
usual fashion on the fourth night of the 
engagement. It was plugged on the screen, 
in lobby, 40,000 heralds and 40,000 of the 
usual paper accessories. 

Other Features 

On the fifth night of the engagement 
"Old Favorite Night," or Revival Night, 
was the featured event, when all patrons of 
the last performance of "Red Headed 
Woman" were invited to stay and witness 
a revival of "Animal Crackers" without 
extra charge. This stunt was also plugged 
on the screen, in ads, stories, in lobby and 
on 40,000 heralds mentioned above. Busi- 
ness for the last show was increased about 
50 per cent. 

Snappy catchlines were used for all news- 
paper ads and in lobby, with the latter's 
pieces treated with white background, flam- 
ing red-head posters of Harlow and set-in 
of composite still panels. A special poster 



and still set piece was used in front cur- 
rently. 

Posting consisted of 35 three-sheets, five 
days in advance; use of 100 display cards 
on fronts of street cars, and use of 20 
twenty-four sheet stands, sniped with bot- 
tom streamer on special events taking place 
nightly. 

Two radio stations were used for a total 
of 15 daily announcements, started one week 
in advance and continued daily until the 
last night, and the event was fuither plugged 
on the screen with a regular trailer one 
week in advance; special trailer for nightly 
events, and via trailers in other Publix 
houses in the city. 

To sum it all up, Willie and Kelley were 
the richer by $100 when M-G-M announced 
that their campaign won first award and 
it looks to us as though they did a mighty 
fine job. Apparently they're an able team 
and we'd like to hear a whole lot more about 
what else is going on down at the Para- 
mount. What say, Ray and Bob? Keep in 
touch with the Club. 



PEOPLE GAVE HEARTY 
RESPONSE TO O'BRIEN 
XMAS PLEA FOR KIDS 

Under the direction of A. Frank O'Brien, 
general manager of Wilmer & Vincent The- 
atres in Reading, Pa., tremendous response 
from local citizens greeted his S. O. S. for 
toys, etc., to gladden the hearts of the poor 
and deserving children on Xmas Day. 

The accompanying photo is misleading as 
to actual number of toys brought to the 
matinees by the more fortunate children in 
lieu of admission. Over 10,000 articles were 
collected and five army trucks were re- 
quired to carry the toys from the Embassy 
and State Theatres to Relief Headquarters, 
where women donated their services to 
dress the dolls and put other articles in con- 
dition for distribution Xmas morning. 

Following the Relief Committee's request 
for 500 additional toys after the first 
matinee was held, O'Brien immediately tied 
up with a leading local newspaper and front 
page stories produced more than the desired 
results. The Mayor, city officials, civic 
workers and members of the Relief Board 
made appearance at the theatre and pro- 
nounced the event the greatest thing of its 
kind ever put over in the city of Reading. 

Congratulations to Frank O'Brien for his 
able handling of this gigantic toy matinee 
for needy youngsters and thanks to Paul 
Glase, manager of the Embassy, for his 
thoughtfulness in the matter of sending 




along the above photo and information. 
The W. & M. crew down in Reading are 
a busy and efficient group of showmen and 
we'll hope to let you all know more about 
their activities in weeks to come. 




THE BELL-RINGER 
AND HAVE FUN 
IN 1933! 

The entire organization of Metro -Qoldwyn-Mayer , . . in its 
Home Office ... in its Studio . . . and throughout its Branch 
Offices ... wishes the industry a very Happy New Year! 



70 

ATTRACTIVE LOBBY 
WAS HIGHLIGHT OF 
GILLMAN CAMPAIGN 

One of the hig-hlights of the campaign 
made on "Prosperity" by Manager S. A. 
Gillman and his staff at the Parkway The- 
atre, Bahimore, Md., was a colorful, attrac- 
tive lobby display, a small photo of which 
we are showing herewith. 

The backboard was striped in red, white 
and blue, as were the words "Prosperity" 
which appeared just above the heads of 
Dressier and Moran. At the feet of Uncle 
Sam was an open money bag, pouring out 
money made by slices of broom-stick handles 
wrapped in regulation money containers. 
The large gold nuggets in front of the money 
bags were pieces of coal painted with gilt. 
Beer kegs were promoted from a local brew- 
ery and the mugs full of near-beer were 
topped off with pieces of cotton to represent 
the old familiar foam. Regular exchange 
certificates, or "Prosperity" bonds, were 




pasted here and there on the back board 
and side \yings and placed in two safe- 
deposit boxes. With a bright, white spot 
trained on the display the accessories looked 
so attractive that the staff had their hands 
full preventing people from carrying them 
off as souvenirs, so Gillman advises. Entire 
cash outlay for lobby only amounted to $4 
for Uncle Sam costume. 

Other Decorations 

The lobby was further decorated by plac- 
ing directly over the doorman's head at 
entrance doors a draped flag with copy of 
Prosperity picture in the centre. The 14 x 
17 photos in neat frames were hung in 
various spots. Further use of the Prosper- 
ity Bonds was made by having two boys 
distribute them at the close of a High 
School football game and in the form of 
ribbon-tied packages "accidently" dropped 
in street cars and busses. A drug store, 
haberdashery and restaurant also aided with 
distrfbution of same. 

Regular accessory Prosperity Stickers 
were also put to excellent use on taxicabs, 
empty store windows and 1,000 paper bags 
put in circulation by a haberdasher. Other 
effort, in addition to regular run of news- 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD December 31, 1932 



RECIPE FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR 

Take twelve fine, full-grown months; make certain they are free from all memories of envy, 
bitterness, hate and jealousy; cleanse from them every clinging spite; pick off all bits of pettiness 
and littleness; in short, see that these months are freed from the past — have them as fresh and 
clean as when they first came from the storehouse of Time. 

Cut these months into thirty or thirty-one equal parts. This batch will keep for just one year. 
Do not attempt to make up the whole batch at one time (so many persons spoil the entire lot 
in this way), but prepare one day at a time, as follows: 

Into each day put twelve parts of faith, eleven parts of patience, ten of courage, nine of 
work (some people omit this ingredient and so spoil the flavor of the rest), eight of hope, seven 
of fidelity, six of liberality, five of kindness, four of rest (leaving this out is like leaving the oil 
out of a salad — and don't do it), three of prayer, two of meditation, and one well selected 
resolution. If you have no conscientious scruples, put in a teaspoonful of good spirits, a dash of 
fun and a pinch of folly, a sprinkling of play, and a heaping cupful of good humor. 

Pour into the whole, love, ad libitum, and mix with a vim. Cook thoroughly, in a fervent 
heat; garnish with a few smiles and a sprig of joy; then serve with quietness, unselfishness and a 
Happy New Year is a certainty. 

— Golden Thoughts. 



paper ads, readers, etc., included several 
mentions made gratis by a local radio broad- 
casting company. 

In line with the announcement by M-G-M 
that awards are to be made for outstanding 
campaigns on "Prosperity" readers may ex- 
pect other accounts from time to time. We 
wish Gillman and his crew luck with their 
entry. The entire staff deserve credit, he 
observes, from manager all the way down 
to porter. 



MAMMOTH CAMPAIGN 
WAGED ON PICTURE 
OF PIONEER DENVER 

Because the story concerned Colorado 
and early mining days the world premiere 
of "Silver Dollar" was staged in Denver, 
at the Denver Theatre, a short time ago. 
The event made screen history as far as 
the city is concerned and a vast barrage of 
advance exploitation was laid down by 
home office officials, author of the story, 
Manager Jerry Zigmond, Publicity Director 
Richard Raub, and the rest of the Denver 
staff under the direction of J. L. Finske. 

Six full pages of publicity, according to 
tear sheets at hand were handed out gratis 
by a leading paper, which printed the story 
serially three weeks in advance, ran a page 
of pictures in its roto section and featured 
photos of first night patrons on the society 
page the day following the premiere. The 
story of the premiere also made front page 
— an unprecedented occurrence in local 
newspaper annals. 

With help of the Chamber of Commerce 
it was arranged for merchants to put on a 
"Silver Dollar" sale the day prior to 
opening. All ads tied-up the picture's title 
with store and merchandise. Merchants 
were enthusiastic over results. 

Cashiers and ushers wore costumes 
reminiscent of the Tabor period (the Colo- 
rado miner who made millions and died a 
poor man) and tickets were made in the 
shape of a silver dollar, printed on silver 
cardboard. The theatre also cooperated 
with schools by admitting scholars at re- 
duced prices. 



Music Feature at Fox-Detroit 

A good share of patronage which formerly 
hunted other sources of good music is now 
enjoying Sunday afternoon concerts by a 
65-piece orchestra at the Fox Theatre, De- 
troit, according to a recent statement by 
Freddie Schader, publicity director. For 
regular performances music is supplied by 
the 20-piece Fox orchestra, singers and 
a F. & M. unit. 



"CHENE" CHENOWETH 
IS VETERAN SHOV/MAN 
TOO; SUBMITS DATA 

Reference made some time ago in this 
department to advertising displays used a 
mere matter of 16 years ago brought a rise 
from H. A. "Chene" Chenoweth, manager 
of the Empire Theatre, Block Island, R. I., 
who forthwith submitted evidence of his 
own activities several years prior, when 
managing houses in New London and 
Thompsonville, Conn. 

"Chene" is one of our veteran showmen 
and his old advertising matter and programs 
were very interesting to look over. While 
we haven't heard from him in some time 
we take it for granted he's still holding 
forth down on his island home, despite the 
fact showbusiness may be a bit off-season 
there right at this time of the year. The 
cod are running, anyway ; eh "Chene" ? 
When he starts up again we'll tell you 
more about what's going on down his way. 



ROUND TABLE BIOGRAPHIES 

Ever since a youngster, Fred L. Bixby, 
former manager of the Kameo Theatre, 
Pittsfield, Mass., and recently placed in 
charge of the Kameo at Lawrence, was 

strongly attracted 
to showbusiness. 

While in college 
a chance came for 
him to work in the 
main office of a 
circuit theatre com- 
pany, and prior 
to that he filled in 
time as an usher. 
Following these 
c o n n e c t i ons he 
worked up to an 
assistant manager's 
post at a theatre in 
Lynn, Mass. Then 
he became a manager and has held down 
jobs at the Franklin Theatre, Springfield; 
the Washington Theatre, Boston; the Park, 
Nashua, N. H. ; the Park, Plymouth, Mass. ; 
the Crown, Lowell, Mass., and the two the- 
atres mentioned in the foregoing paragraph. 
He has dealt with both straight picture and 
combination shows. 

Bixby was born in Salem, Mass., Sept. 
17, 1909, educated in the public schools of 
that city and received a B.S. degree at 
Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me. He's in 
showbusiness for keeps, he advises us. Yes, 
girls, he's still single. 




Fred L. Bixby 



December 3 1, I 932 



ROUND TABLE CLUB 



71 



BROWN. MILLER AND 
HARDY TURNING OUT 
ATTRACTIVE LOBBIES 

We've had occasion befoi-e this to present 
examples of the fine poster and lobby art 
work turned out by Harry E. Brown, man- 
ager of the Fox-Stanford Theatre, Palo 
Alto, Calif., in which he is ably assisted by. 
Artist Kenneth Miller and Ray Hardy, in 
charge of maintenance. 

This time we have for you a display 
made for "All American," which represents 
an eight-foot football with stadium and field 
backgrounds on the shoulders of two play- 
ers. The main background was done in gold 
cloth. In the upper left and right hand 
corners are paintings of Ernie Nevers and 
"Pop" Warner. 

We also note that the team of Brown, 
Miller and Hardy are turning out some 
attractive front banners, or curtains, by 
working with oilcloth of various colors. The 
cloth can be obtained quite cheaply when 
bought by the bolt and striking effects can 
be produced by using letters in sharp con- 
trasting colors of flitter. Most anyone can 
block-in letters with glue and then sprinkle 
on the flitter, scallop the edges, baton the 
top and then have an attractive banner that 
will cover the front under the marquee. 
Brown's usually run about 14 feet by 3 
feet. A sign on one reads: "This curtain 
will rise at 2:15 P. M." 

EFFECTIVE UNIT! 

Brown and his assistants work as a unit 
and the combination has proven a profitable 
one. When they turn out material for a 
couple of lobbies it generally serves for 
four, by rearranging and retouching here 
and there and transferring the displays from 
inner lobby to outside. Miller is a young 
Palo Alto showman who is rapidly advanc- 
ing in his chosen profession. Hardy is the 
lighting expert, technician and aids in build- 
ing of all still and mechanical lobbies. Both 
are a decided asset to the theatre. How- 
ever, we'll go on record in stating that 
Harry Brown can also think up a few ideas 




himself, although he modestly refrains from 
taking any credit. We'll hope to present 
further examples of their work from time 
to time. 



POSTER ART WORK 
FOR THE THEATRE! 

Drawn by Donald Andorfer 




JOHN 
DARBYMOAE 

RASPUTIN 



Here is what we would term an unusual 
poster by reason of the contrasting solid 
Ijlack background which brings the features 
of the character so much to the fore. At 
least, that is the way we felt about it, so 
we asked two poster artists here in New 
York for their opinion and they were just 
as impressed with it as we were. So that 
made it unanimous. 

It is the work of Donald E. Andorfer, 
poster artist for Fred Hinds at the Strand 
Theatre in Whitewater, Wis., and should 
definitely put to rest any idea that the best 
artists are all in the big key cities. We've 
already reproduced dozens of fine art ex- 
amples from more smaller spots than all 
the key cities put together. 

A certain amount of effectiveness is nat- 
urally lost in making a photo of the above 
poster because of colors that do not photo- 
graph accurately. Regular poster men will, 
however, take this into consideration be- 
fore passing judgment. We trust they will 
number Donald's contributions among those 
worth using themselves. 



SAN PEDRO HONORED 
DOC CREWS' THEATRE 
ON lOTH BIRTHDAY 

The Chamber of Commerce and many 
individuals paid tribute to C. S. "Doc" 
Crews, manager of the Fox-Cabrillo Thea- 
tre, San Pedro, Calif., on occasion of the 
Tenth Anniversary celebration by support- 
ing a 12-page Birthday edition of a paper, 
bearing a large photo of "Doc" himself on 
the front page and carrying in following 
pages enough advertising to gladden the 
heart of the hardest-boiled promoter. 

All of which is a testimonial to the good 
work Crews has put forth while in charge 
of the Cabrillo. May he live long and con- 
tinue to prosper ! We'll hope to tell Club 
members more about this energetic show- 
man's way of doing business, feeling sure 
that he has many ideas up his sleeve which 
will help all of us over the tough spots. 



CLUB DETECTIVES i 
FIND DICK WRIGHT; ^ 
HE'S BUSY AS EVER 

After losing track of Round Tabler Dick 
Wright, manager of the Strand Theatre, 
Akron, Ohio, for a couple of months, we are 
pleased to report that Club sleuth-hounds 
have relocated him right in the same spot, 
busy as ever selling shows; in fact, he's 
been so darned busy that time just couldn't 
be found to gather material for a con- 
tribution to this department. 

We hear that a "Used Garment" stunt, 
sponsored by the United Veterans Commit- 
tee for benefit of all needy in the city, went 
with a bang and produced a lot of word-of- 
mouth advertising and good will for the 
Strand. This clothing matinee got. under 
way at the theatre with a Friday show at 
10 A. M., when patrons were admitted for 
some article of clothing. The newspapers 
backed up the move with a generous amount 
of publicity. 

Both Wright and Frank King, the latter 
manager of the Colonial Theatre in Akron, 
have been tying in with a local newspaper 
on a classified page stunt, consisting of giv- 
ing guest tickets to those sending in com- 
plete letters of a "mystery word" scattered 
among the ads on the page. Both houses 
netted a goodly amount of free space. 

Looking over some data on Wright's cam- 
paign on "Tiger Shark," it's a foregone con- 
clusion that Dick put in his time to ex- 
cellent advantage by reaping a whole lot of 
free space, arranging ballyhoos and other 
exploitation. His efforts included con- 
struction of a most attractive front ; string- 
ing of a large banner across street by the- 
atre; mounting of tire cover ads on fifty 
yellow cabs; walking bally of seven-foot 
giant in fisherman's coat; placing of dash- 
board cards on 65 street cars ; distribution 
of special heralds via Liberty Magazine; 
circularization of hunting-fishing associa- 
tions by special postcard; a newspaper gag 
for best fish story; classified ad page gag 
of missing word; news carriers guests of 
theatre at special matinee, and a strong 
newspaper advertising campaign. 

All of Wright's fellow Club members will 
appreciate his suggestions outlined above, 
we're sure. We understand he recently put 
over a corking campaign on "I Am A Fugi- 
tive," and will be on watch for detailed in- 
formation. Just as soon as we receive it, 
his plan will be passed along the line. 



FOR "DEAR MAURICE" 




The attractive front pictured above was 
executed for the big Paramount Theatre, 
New York City, by Duke Wellington in 
honor of the personal appearance of the 
popular Maurice Chevalier. Louis Nathan 
handled the camera for the photo. 



72 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD December 31, 1932 




I lilies 



WILLIAM WAGNER 
districf manager for Fox-Midwest in the 
Kansas City zone, was recently elected a 
member of the board of directors of the 
M.P.T.O. of Kansas-Missouri, a vacancy 
created by transfer of Art Zimmer, Fox 
district manager at Dodge City, to 
Springfield, III. 

V 

EDDIE SELETTE 

recently in charge of the Strand Theatre, 
E. M. Loew house in New Bedford, Mass., 
has rejoined the Morse and Rothenberg 
Circuit in the capacity of field manager. 
He will start at the Pastime, Marlboro, 
and after a couple of weeks there will go 
to the State at Quincy, where he will be 
stationed for some time. 

V 

CARL NIESSE 

for the past eleven years manager of the- 
atres in Indianapolis for Publix and 
Skouras, has been appointed manager of 
the two Fox-Midwesco houses in Fond du 
Lac, Wis., succeeding Nat Blank, who re- 
cently joined the circuit on the West 
Coast. 

V 

LEWIS A. DORAN 

former assistant to Chelle Janis at Loew's 
Century Theatre, Brooklyn, N. Y., is now at 
Loew's Alpine Theatre, same city. 

V 

L. D. SUIDREY 

has purchased the Idle Hour Theatre, 
Oakdale, La., from F. E. Moree. Suidrey 
also operates the DeRidder Theatre, De 
Ridder, La. 

V 

J. MAXWELL JOICE 

former publicity director of a number of 
leading New York and Detroit houses, is 
conducting a Broadway Column for "La 
Informacion," daily Spanish newspaper. 

V 

PATRICK F. LYDON 

is in charge of the Tremont Theatre, Bos- 
ton, a legitimate house for the past 40 
years and recently reopened under a sec- 
ond run picture policy. 

V 

JACK LYKES 

formerly manager of Loew's Park Theatre, 
Cleveland, has been transferred to a sim- 
ilar post at Loew's Stillman, same city. 

V 

ZACK FREEDMAN 

recently at the helm of the Audubon The- 
atre, New York City, has been appointed 
assistant to Leonidoff, production execu- 
tive at Radio City. 

V 

A. J. SIMMONS 

operator of the Plaza Theatre, Lamar, Mo., 
is another theatre man to join the asso- 
ciation for the advancement of relief for 
bandits. Hold-up men netted $500 as a 
result of a recent call at Simmons' office. 



COL LEWIS TO YOU! 

Charles E. "Chick" Lewis, your edi- 
tor and co-conspira+or in the weekly 
meetings of the Round Table Club, is 
one of this industry's most recent 
"Colonels" and Aide de Camps on 
the staff of Governor Ruby Laffoon 
of Kentucky, suhl 

Mr. Lewis's Commission, which ar- 
rived via special envoy just before 
this department was put to bed, en- 
titles him to most rigid Publix salute 
and heel click, which, we take for 
granted, will be duly observed in the 
future. Carry on, men! 



S. BERNARD JOFFEE 
is again at the helm of the Fox-Uptown 
Theatre, Kansas City, following this the- 
atre's return to first run policy. 

V 

LOUIS LISS 

is the new manager of the Atlantic The- 
atre, Brooklyn, N. Y. He was formerly in 
charge of the Terminal,, another Brooklyn 
house. 

V 

LOUIS MOFFAT 

is the new assistant manager at the Pub- 
lix-Capitol Theatre, Allston, Mass. He was 
formerly at the Uptown, Boston. 

V 

HARRY HARDY 

formerly in charge of the Paramount The- 
atre, Salt Lake City, is now city manager 
for R. B. Wilby in Knoxville, Tenn., with 
supervision of the Tennessee, Riviera and 
Strand Theatres. 

V 

GEORGE A. HIRLIMAN, 
of New York City, head of the Exhibitor's 
Screen Service, accompanied by Mrs. 
Hirliman, recently made a brief business 
visit to Dallas, Tex. 

V 

CURT BECK 

manager of the Majestic Theatre, Dallas, 
and his staff, are reported at the head of 
the Southern division for honors in the 
RKO Thrift Book campaign. 

V 

A. A. KOHN 

who recently reopened the Leader Theatre, 
Baltimore, has also taken over operation 
of the Pennington Theatre, Curtis Bay, and 
will reopen after making repairs. 

V 

GEORGE BAKER 

manager of the Pubiix-Newman Theatre, 
Kansas City, was a close observer of the 
150 pounds of mistletoe hung in the lobby 
over the holiday season. 

V 

TOM McCLOSKEY 

has been appointed manager of the new 
Williamsburg Theatre, built at Williams- 
burg, Va., by the Rockefeller interests. 



A. C. LINDQUIST 

district service manager for RCA Photo- 
phone in Kansas City for the past three 
years, has been transferred to a similar 
post in Detroit. He is succeeded in K. C. 
by O. V. Swisher, former service manager 
in Chicago. Don Davis remains in charge 
of sales in Kansas City. 

V 

MIKE NEILSON 

operator of the Grand Theatre, Preston, 
Idaho, and the Grand Theatre, Logan, 
Utah, recently announced that the Grand 
Theatre, Brigham City, Utah, a house re- 
cently purchased from Harmon Peery, 
would be reopened about Feb. I. 

V 

CLIFF WORK 

has succeeded J. J. Franklin as city man- 
ager for RKO Theatres in San Francisco. 
Franklin has been assigned a similar post 
in Cleveland. 

V 

MADELINE WOODS 

for several years director of publicity for 
Great States Theatres, Chicago, recently 
resigned her post. Publicity and advertis- 
ing will henceforth be handled in the 
field by theatre managers. 

V 

ARTHUR MAHHEWS 
of Medina, has leased the Plymouth The- 
atre, Plymouth, Ohio, a house dark for 
the past six months and now operating as 
second run grind. 

V 

J. E. KISLAK, INC. 

recently leased the Courtland Theatre, 
North Bergen, N. J., from Louis Cohen of 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

V 

W. H. RAYNOR 

manager of Keith's Theatre, Boston, re- 
cently inaugurated the policy of five shows 
daily instead of four, with a reduction in 
admission. The action followed reductions 
made by other local houses and is the first 
change in the price schedule at Keith's 
since it opened. 

V 

MARVIN C. PARK 

manager of the RKO Orpheum Theatre, 
Minneapolis, has lately been directing 
changes of programs from a sick bed in 
a local hospital. 

V 

S. S. SOLOMON 

manager of the Paramount Theatre, 
Youngstown, Ohio, and P. D. Bathory, 
treasurer, are two more managers to con- 
tribute to the Bandit's Relief Fund. Hold- 
up men forced them to open the safe and 
hand over $40. 

V 

ABE SABLOSKY 

and John McGuirk have taken over 
Keith's Theatre in Philadelphia and will 
show first run Radio pictures and a pro- 
gram of vaudeville acts. 



In thfe short subject field there is no argument. It's 
Educational Pictures, Recognized leaders now, and 
for years past. Acknowledged by the public, by the 
critics, by the industry. Playing every great circuit of 
theatres in the country. 

During the 1933 climb back to prosperity, keep 
good cheer and pep and laughter in your shows 
with plenty of comedies and novelties. Guarantee 
highest quality through all your program by playing 
Educadonal Pictures. 




"THE SPICE OFTHE PROGRAM' 




UJORLD UIIDE 
PICTURES 



Great authors . . . Eugene O'Neill, Edna Ferber, Vina Delmar, 
Faith Baldwin, Tiffany Thayer, Rupert Hughes, Conan Doyle and 
many other world famous "best sellers". Great casts . . . Jack Oakie, 
Lowell Sherman, Moran and Mack, Mary Astor, Lilyan Tashman, 
Chester Morris, Zasu Pitts, Bela Lugosi, Peggy Shannon, Ken 
Maynard and scores of other big marquee names. Great pictures . . . 
"HYPNOTIZED", "The LAST MILE", "THOSE WE LOVE", 
»'The CROOKED CIRCLE", "FALSE FACES", "TRAILING 
The KILLER", "The DEATH KISS". 

World Wide Pictures have written an important chapter in 
picture history in the depression year 1932. They'll write still 
bigger history, at your box-office, in 1933. 



74 

DIGNIFIED NOTE IN 
STAGE WEDDING THAT 
ED RIVERS PROMOTED 

A stage wedding planned to dignify and 
solemnize a stunt which otherwise might 
offend church members and the more 
straight-laced people of the community was 
successfully staged by Eddie Rivers, man- 
ager of the Granada Theatre, Lewiston, 
Idaho, recently. 

After arranging the usual merchant's tie- 
ups, which included a score of presents for 
the bride and groom and a full-page news- 
paper co-operative ad, Eddie then busied 
himself to secure the proper atmosphere for 
the affair. But before we go into that, take 
a glance at the co-operative ad he promoted 
among the several merchants who helped 
make the affair a huge success. A nice ad 
for the participants and a good break for 
the theatre and current attraction, to our 
way of thinking. 

A huge electric cross with three colors of 
lights on dimmers was borrowed from one 
of the churches for use on the stage. A local 
florist was then contacted to elaborately 
decorate the stage in return for the adver- 
tising value it offered him. 

Society debutantes were secured to act 
as bridesmaids and their escorts, in Tuxedos 
as honorary ushers. The affair was made as 
formal as possible with plenty of Tuxedos 
and evening gowns in evidence and the 
bride's gown fashioned in formal fashion. 

Music was furnished by one of the 
churches, which included a soloist. After 
the ceremony a wedding march down the 
aisle, and the bride and groom were shot 
into a Yellow Cab to ride through the down- 
town section several times with tin cans, old 
shoes, etc., tied to a taxi bearing banners, 
"Just Married," etc. 

Rather than present the many gifts from 
the stage. Rivers printed a special program, 
listing the donors, and giving the bride's 
and groom's name, etc. 

Rivers declares that to follow the solemn 
ceremony by awarding the presents from the 



stage would destroy the solemn and dignified 
atmosphere which has been so carefully 
built up and give the rah-rah portion of the 
audience too much opportunity to start 
throwing rice and old shoes and, possibly, 
creating a burlesque atmosphere. This is 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



"ZOMBIE" IN LONDON 




Picfured above is one of the features of 
the campaign made on "White Zombie" by 
Robb Lawson, of the Dominion Theatre,'"' 
London, England. Five "Zombies" enacted 
a scene in front of the 40-feet high dis- 
play depicting "The House of the Living 
Dead." Box office records for the past 
six months were broken during run of 
picture. 



Eddie's fourth stage wedding, and in his 
opinion his most beautifully staged and suc- 
cessful so far. 

A stage wedding is a sure business getter 
at any time if handled properly. Rivers be- 
lieves. He billed his as a "Mystery Stage 
Wedding" and covered the business houses 
with small window cards a week ahead bear- 
ing the following copy : "What prominent 
local couple will be married at the Granada 
Mystery Wedding on Friday, September 
9th," with a big question mark covering a 
third of the card. 

Two thousand invitations, printed in script 
and on bristol stock, costing but little, were 
distributed to patrons at the two preceding 
shows to advertise the affair. 

He thinks it advisable to pick a suitable 
picture, with a title not only fitting the oc- 
casion, but also of a good, wholesome family 
type of entertainment. Many church people 
and others not classed as regular showgoers 
are attracted to a stage wedding and noth- 
ing should be screened to offend their taste, 
but rather an opportunity is presented to 
entertain and make regular film fans of such 
people, he points out. 

Incidentally, Eddie is a .former chain cir- 
cuit employee who tired of the "rules and 
regulations" brigade and went into business 
for himself seven years ago, and who has 
never regretted making the change. 



Unemployment Gag! 

The management of Loew's Broad Thea- 
tre, Columbus, Ohio, convinced a local news- 
paper that it would be worthwhile for all 
concerned to run a cooperative ad tying up 
an offer of guest tickets to anyone respond- 
ing to one of the "wanted" ads in the classi- 
fied section of the paper. The paper ran a 
deep 2-column display announcement in the 
news section and a boxed 2-column notice 
on the classified page. 



December 31, 1932 

WE PREDICT TAYLOR 
WILL BE VALUABLE 
ADDITION TO CLUB 

Like a lot of other managers, who feel 
that they must put over some sensational 
stunt to become a member of the Round 
Table Club, Kenneth Taylor, manager of 
the Strand and Ritz Theatres, Uvalde, 
Texas, waited until he had something to 
his liking before giving us a flash. We 
won't engage right now in an argument on 
what it takes in exploitation and advertising 
to crash the columns of this department 
but will confine ourselves to the statement 
that a few snapshots, two of which we are 
reproducing herewith, disclose that Tay- 
lor should have joined this outfit long ago. 

Any person who caught an eyeful of his 
bailies on "Tiger Shark" and "Cabin in the 
Cotton" and didn't get a kick out of them 
ought to be put in the old people's home. 
The former consisted of a fisherman's 
sharpie, fisherman and marine props of alli- 
gators and a big garfish. The man had his 
line hooked to the mouth of the gar, just as 
though he was trying to land the huge fish. 
The sides of the truck, as you may see, 
were strikingly bannered with copy pertain- 
ing to picture, star and theatre. 

How do you like the one on "Cabin?" 
Neat, eh, with the old plantation hut and 
negro characters? There was a piano in- 
side the cabin and the negroes played and 
sang as the bally wended its way around 
town. After serving as a bally the cabin 
was brought in and built around the box 
office. Plenty of cotton — real cotton, by the 
way, was also in evidence. 

We think we've already conveyed the 
impression that Taylor will become a valu- 




able member of this Club and if we haven't, 
we'll make the statement right here. His 
boss, H. W. Little, also operates a chain of 
wholesale groceries and being too busy with 
that end put Kenneth on the job to take 




care of his two houses. Trade right 
now does not permit opening the Ritz, so 
he's concentrating on the Strand. Ken 
worked in a bank for a year, took a fling 
at clerking in a hotel for a term and then 
joined up with Mr. Little. He likes show- 
business, and we think showbusiness will 
be kind to him. 



...a real...honest-to- goodm ss... 



Uutodat 
mKt e/ 



I THE STAGE TONIGHT 




A beautiful 
dignified and 
imprasicie 
marriage 
ctnmony. 



who Is? 

the luck) couple? 



flowers 

L, B. HILL 



HARVEY'S 



■nwWEimi.Nf.BANyi'n 



1 "PARKWAY- HAT , 



THE BRIDAL VEU. 
AJIT CRAFT SHOP 




At9P.M. 



Ihe bride'i nhoet 
and hositry— 



Bnitct Bnian Shot S(or 



OTR GIFT- 

WBIGHT^ rHARMACV 

A BOX Oj^CANDY! 
SA.M COLLINS 



A Beautiful 
NIGHT GOWN 



A Bab; Bath Tub 



A Silk Pilloic... 

BEaun mima. 



Engajtment and 
Wedding Ring 



McFHAIL Imin Start 



CHECKER CAB 

PHONE T 



A WEDDING BOOK: 
SCHICK 6- HOWE 



Motion Picture 
DAILY taiies a 






For being first with 
hot news and cold 




76 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, I 932 



ENGLISH TRADE GOOD 
SAYS GEO. ROBINSON. 
BUT NOT MANAGEMENT 

Following return to England, his native 
land, George Robinson, former manager of 
a number of theatres in California, ad- 
vises the Herald that business in general 
is in far better shape over there than here. 
Showbusiness, it appears, is included in his 
optimistic survey, 'though from an article 
which he wrote for "Cinema," an Eng- 
lish publication, theatres are differently con- 
ducted in London and environs. With his 
permission and giving due credit to its 
source, read his diatribe on the system he 
claims exists in his home city: 

"Visit from George E. Robinson-, erst- 
while manager of several cinemas in Cali- 
fornia, who has come back to his own 
country. Conditions, he thinks, are bet- 
ter in England than in America, although 
he considers that British cinemas are 
not run so well. In America the rule is 
that the patron is always right, but he 
has not found any corresponding idea in 
England. 

"Tells me that in one cinema over here 
he told the doorman that there was a lot 
of ground noise, and the doorman re- 
plied 'I have nothing to do with that' 
'You are working for the house?' replied 
Robinson. 'My place is in the front of 
the house,' said the doorman. 'Isn't it 
your place to report a fault if a patron 
tells you about it?' 'I don't care a 
d ,' replied the doorman. 

"At another house he found the pic- 
ture flickering so badly that it was pain- 
ful to look at it. It took him 20 minutes 
to get a word with the manager, who 
simply told him he could not be bothered 
about it. 

"Both those houses lost a potential 
future patron. That's not the way to 
keep business — I quite agree with Robin- 
son about that. Every member of the 
staff should treat every patron who takes 
the trouble to make a complaint politely, 
and should pass the complaint on to the 
right quarters; and the person responsi- 
ble should see that the defect is reme- 
died. 

"For one person who takes the trouble 
to make a complaint there may be a hun- 
dred who are dissatisfied but say nothing 
about it. Instead of regarding a patron 
who makes a gnimble as a nuisance, a 
cinema proprietor should be grateful to 
him or her for bringing the grievance, 
whatever it happens to be, to the notice 
of the house." 

At the risk of becoming involved in an in- 
ternational dispute and disruption of friend- 
ly relations among London and New York 
film circles, we're rather inclined to side 
with Showman Robinson's criticism of dis- 
courtesy at the theatre door, or, elsewhere, 
for that matter. At the same time neither 
do we approve of the ultra-unctious behav- 
ior of some of our theatre attendants over 



METZGER AND VINCENT'S FINE CO-OP! 





F*fth Avenue at Broadway 



1 



"ONCE IN A LIFETIME" 1 

CACTi JACK OASB-ZAIU Ptm-L«UUa VAZKMSA- ALIKE lUcH ABOM-BIDKET POX ^! 

1 



.'^his n ihf pirliin all Hif i-v- - c> -.-j .'■"/< :'iru' !o 5U*' ■ - >. 6- •Hf'C'-Jfd a !cno !-.nf oU Carl l^aemmUn 
r - 'an- O HERE IT 1/ 



IN EACH OF THE ADS BELOW THERE IS AN OPPORTUNITY OF A "UFETIME" 

^ ^ ® ^ # 




IF YOU GET IT AT KHIN'S 

VOU NEED Bin' OMY 

Once in a Lifetime 



Above is a reproduction of the fine double truck co-op ad that "Once in a 
Lifetime" inspired F. F. Vincent, exploitation man for Lou Metzger's Spreckels 
Theatre, to promote. All the several ads stressed the fact that only "once In a 
lifetime" came an opportunity such as this to buy the listed merchandise. 



in this country. A happy medium of cour- 
tesy would seem an objective worthy of con- 
sideration. As to complaints, that old ruling 
of the customer generally being "right," is 
a pretty good one to follow in most cases. 



REOPENING OF HOUSE 
GAVE DELIS A CHANCE 
TO PROMOTE CO-OP AD 

A short time ago we announced that 
George Delis, former manager of the Capi- 
tol Theatre, Steubenville, Ohio, had been 
appointed manager of the Palace Theatre 
there by A. G. Constant, well known oper- 
ator of theatres in Steubenville and East 
Liverpool. 

A newspaper tear sheet at hand dis- 
closes that Delis didn't lose any time get- 
ting under sail. Practically a full page of 
ads from local merchants testified their 
enthusiasm on occasion of reopening the 
house to the public, in which the Palace 
ad was the centre of attraction. 

Good luck to Constant, Delis and assist- 
ant manager Keith Chambers with their 
latest enterprise. The Palace is described 
as a "Million Dollar Institution," so at- 
tainment of what they all seek will not be 
handicapped from lack of a fine house. 
We'll depend upon Delis and his associates 
to come through, and to keep the Club in- 
formed on what they're doing. 



CONLEY AND KIPPEL 
MADE FINE DISPLAY 
ON "CABIN" PICTURE 

Attractive, ingenious displays on "Cabin 
in the Cotton" are not by any means con- 
fined to our Club members below the Mason- 
Dixon Line, according to a photograph we 
have at hand of one made for the Stanley 
Theatre, Jersey City, N. J., by Larry Con- 
ley and Mickey Kippel. 

The windows in the large cabin were 
all transparent and lighted from behind, as 
was the smaller cabin in the background. 
There's a moon back of the chimney, wheth- 
er you can see it or not, and the cotton at 
either side was the real McCoy. A phono- 



BASKET NIGHT GROWING POPULAR! 

Here's one engineered by Russell Cohen out on Long Island. 

He tied up with a local grocery store and boomed business on an off night by distributim 
several dozen baskets of groceries. All items were standard, advertised numbers, and amounted 
to not less than a dollar and a half in retail value. 

While this thought is not unlike the turkey giveaway mentioned elsewhere in this issue, the 
object of the Basket Night is to build up over a definite or indefinite period some off night 
that can stand some help. 

Cohen selected one of the toughest nights of the week, Saturday, because the night business 
on that particular day has never been any too good due to so many people driving into Jamaica, 
some fifteen minutes from town, for their shopping and theatres. He reports that business has 
increased each week since the idea was inaugurated, three weeks ago. 



graph hidden in the rear of the mezzanine 
played a continuous record of negro mel- 
odies sung by the Hall- Johnson choir. In 
addition, the ten posts in the large lobby 
were draped with transparent silk cloth, 
lighted from behind. Black cutout flitter 
letters of the ten most important players in 
the picture were placed on the cloth. 

While the small photo reproduced here 
does not do justice to Conley and Kippel's 
display, it will serve in a way to give their 
fello^y members an idea of how it looked 
when set up in the Stanley's lobby. We've 
already published several accounts of inter- 
esting work done on this picture and their 
work appears to rank with the top-notchers. 



December 31, 1932 

ZIMMERMAN DOUBLED 
MONDAY NIGHT GROSS 
WITH CO-OP AD PLAN 

Monday night patronage has been doubled 
as the result of a cooperative advertising 
plan put into effect several months ago by 
M. A. Zimmerman, manager of the Port- 
land Theatre, Casselton, N. Dak. 

His stunt is known as "Booster Night" 
and came about through stepping up the 
number of slide advertisers from four to 
fourteen. The merchants were sold the idea 
of handing out a "Booster Ticket," good for 
admission to the theatre on any Monday 
night, with every purchase of one dollar's 
worth of merchandise. Zimmerman asked 
them to try the scheme out for two months 
before passing any judgment and at the end 
of that time only two were dropped from 
the list of 14 stores. 

The deal works out to excellent advan- 
tage for the merchant when a customer pur- 
chases some article at a price less than one 
dollar, thereby giving the merchant a chance 
to induce the sale of some other piece of 
merchandising through offer of the special 
theatre ticket. Zimmerman failed to note 
what his regular admission amounted to so 
our readers' guesses are as good as ours. 
We'll gamble it's not vt. . y lar away from the 
20 cents stipulated on the Booster ticket and 
that his advertising revenue plus the 20 
cents nets the house a good profit. 

He advises keeping a check on stores to 
find out if any merchant is giving tickets 
with less than a dollar's worth of merchan- 
dise. One of his advertisers did that some 
time ago and the infraction was called to 
Zimmerman's attention by seven others in- 
side of one hour on a certain morning. They 
threatened to discontinue the deal unless the 
offending merchant stopped his practice at 
once. After being told he would be checked 
off the list this particular storekeeper turned 
out to be one of the best boosters of the lot. 

One other theatre man in the State, ac- 
cording to Zimmerman's estimate, is also 
using the above plan and is likewise reaping 
excellent returns from anotherwise off night. 
A number of requests have come in to M. A. 
for information on the stunt and he's taking 
this means to pass it along the line. 

He is peculiarly situated out his way and 
if any of our members can suggest a method 
to improve matters we're sure he will ap- 



A BIG FLASH! 




When Cecil DeMille's opus "Sign of the 
Cross" opened at the Rialto, New York 
City, the Busy Corner was the center of a 
vast blaze of electric illumination cast from 
the big signs on marquee and front. Duke 
Wellington engineered the display; Louis 
Nathan took the photo. 



ROUND TABLE CLUB 



CALGARY SENSATION! 




Above is a photographic reproduction of 
what Pete Egan, manager of the Palace 
Theatre, Calgary, Canada, describes as one 
of the finest fronts ever built In his city. 
"Smilin' Through" was the subject and the 
work was engineered by Manager Harry 
Black, of the Capitol Theatre, and his 
Scenic Artist, Herbert Hahan. 



preciate the act. Casselton is located about 
22 miles from the city of Fargo, where two 
large chain houses offer special inducements 
to out-of-town patronage. There are also 
three second-run independent houses in 
Fargo which charge from 10 to 15 cents 
admission. While Sunday shows are taboo 
in North Dakota, Moorhead, Minn., just 
across the river from Fargo, is within the 
law and takes many a patron there on Sun- 
days. Hard-surfaced roads connect Cassel- 
ton with both of the larger cities and the- 
atre ads especially directed to out-of-town 
patronage and the lure of large department 
stores has brought about quite a serious 
problem for Zimmerman to cope with. 

What To Do? 

What to do about it? Maybe some of his 
fellow Round Tablers can offer some good 
suggestions. Now don't all answer "repeal 
the Sunday law !" That's a big order. How- 
ever, we venture to state that there are 
many others in this Club who have faced 
with the same situation and evolved some 
plan to cope with it. How to hold 'em in 
town is apparently the question. Maybe 
considerable institutional selling; re-vamp- 
ing of a booking situation which allows even 
competition with the de luxe house on that 
scale ; careful building of programs ; a care- 
fully worked out cooperative campaign be- 
tween theatre man and merchants, etc., etc. 
C'mon, fellows, let's have your ideas on the 
subject. 



CINCINNATI TRANSFERS 

Recent closing of the Capitol Theatre, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, brought about the follow- 
ing changes among RKO managerial ranks • 
Harry Schrieber, manager, and Horace 
Wersel, assistant manager, of the Capitol, 
have been transferred to the Grand in same 
capacities ; William Dodds, former man- 
ager of the Grand, succeeds Lew Pressler 
as assistant manager of the Albee, and 
Erwin Bock, lately in charge of the State 
Theatre, Dayton, has gone back to his old 
job as assistant manager of the Lyric. 



77 

H. LASHLEY GAMBLED 
ON FOOTBALL HERALD 
AND WON HIS POINT 

Without a doubt, H. T. Lashley, manager 
of the Carolina Theatre, Greenville, S. C, 
is a bit of a gambler, as are the majority of 
fellows who make showbusiness their means 
of livelihood. 

Ten minutes before the football game de- 
ciding the state championship between Fur- 
man University and University of South 
Carolina came to a close he distributed a 
quantity of heralds carrying the following 
copy : "We Told You So ! ! ! — Furman 
Wins ! — And Now Here's Another Good 
Tip ! Go To See The Great Football Epic 
— 'The All American' — Carolina — (Dates, 
etc.). 

'Course Dick had the bills printed up be- 
fore the game ; however, he didn't gamble 
a whole lot with the printer for he stipulated 
no pay if Furman lost the game. "Believe 
it or not," states Lashley, "U. S. C. was 
expected to win that game." 

Newspaper clippings at hand bear evidence 
that Lashley and the Furman team hit it up 
pretty well during the season. It was seen 
to that the squad had a look-in each week 
at pictures and a grand finale was staged 
for the champions when "All American" 
was shown at the theatre. All the players 
were introduced from the stage and the 
40-piece Furman Band furnished music for 
the occasion. 

All of which garnered considerable news- 
paper and word-of-mouth publicity for our 
good friend Dick, to say nothing of further 
cementing the good will he has been build- 
ing between school and theatre. 

Before we sign off, let us note that he 
chiseled a large display ad out of a local 
paper because that newspaper regularly ran 
the Will Rogers syndicated matter and be- 
cause of the appearance of Rogers in "Too 
Busy To Work" at the Carolina. For any- 
one similarly situated this tie-up is one of 
those "naturals" that shouldn't be over- 
looked. Okay to this Round Tabler and 
more power to him for the effective work 
he's doing down in Greenville. More con- 
cerning his activities at a later date. 

Dick and his gang are always on the job 
down in their city and we feel sure that we 
can count upon all of them to furnish their 
quota of useful information to this depart- 
ment. 



SHANGHAI BALLY! 




Showmen In Shanghai, China, ballyhooed 
"Doomed Battalion" by having a squad of 
men march through the streets with banners 
on their backs and drum in hands of the 
leader. An appropriately bannered armored 
car with gun turret also proved an effec- 
tive means of attracting atte'xtion. 



78 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 




"THE ALL 
AMERICAN" 

With Richard Arlen 

Andy Devine — James CIcason 
Gloria Stuart — June Clyde 

AND THE 1931 ALL AMERICAN 
TEAM 

INCLUDING JERRY pALRYMPLE 

oy Little Rock 
PLUS 

Donald Novh. In "Sla's Pride is J^tu." 
Pictorial— Flip the Ftoq Cartoon 
Vjiiverial News Events 

ITARTS TOOAV! 

Ckpiiol 

Slrraien of M BffwUT 



December 31, 1932 



ROUND TABLE CLUB 



79 



START THE NEW YEAR RIGHT-JOIN! 



ROBERT ETCHBERSER 

has the job of assisting Don W. Ross with 
management of Loew's Regent Theatre, 
Harrlsburg, Pa., and we're also glad to 
record his name among the many assistant 
managers already enrolled in the Round 
Table Club. We had a line on Etchberger 
when he was associated with Loew's Stan- 
ley Theatre in Baltimore, where he worked 
his way up the ladder from an usher's job 
to chief usher and assistant manager. At 
the rate this young showman is plodding 
along it certainly won't be long before 
he'll be up another notch. Ask your boss. 
Bob, to let the Club know what's going 
on at the Regent. 

V 

LOUIS LISS 

manages the Atlantic Theatre for the 
Dean Amusement Company over in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and he's another recruit 
for our large and ever-growing army of 
theatre managers. Louis was formerly 
manager of the Terminal Theatre, another 
Brooklyn house, and is a seasoned show- 
man. The fellows still do some exploitation 
work across the Bridge and we'll hope to 
get a line on the brand being turned out 
by Liss. We'll be checking up on you, 
Louis, so get busy and shoot in some 
ideas for us to pass along to your brother 
Round Tablers. 

V 

HOWARD HANSEN 

is located down in the popular resort city 
of Asbury Park, N. J., where he manages 
the Rialto Theatre. We are also in receipt 
of his recent application for membership 
In this great army of showmen and want 
him to know that we're mighty glad to 
record his name among the rest. Next 
time you write the Club, Howard, let us 
know how things are down in Asbury, and 
include a report on that last exploitation 
stunt that helped boost the box office. 
The rest of the gang will be waiting to 
hear what you're doing, so shoot your 
Ideas along. 

V 

MIKE KIRKHART 

manages the Fox-Lincoln Theatre out in 
Charleston, 111., and he's another Fox- 
Midwesco man to become a member of 
this ever-increasing organization of show- 
men. Mike admits that he's been reading 
Club pages in the Herald every week and 
that just plain everyday neglect in the 
matter of sending in his application has 
kept his name from appearing among the 
weekly crops of new members. Okay, 
Mike, better late than never; let's hope 
you make un all the lost time bv shooting 
along a little information on what's going 
on out in your theatre. 



JENNINGS McDonald 

is another recent addition to the con- 
stantly growing ranks of this large army 
of showmen and he works for Publix down 
at the Ellanay Theatre in El Paso, Texas. 
McDonald is twenty-four years of age and 
has been in showbusiness for the past five 
years, having served his time under Dent 
Theatres, Inc., and Publix. He started in 
as usher, worked his way to doorman and 
assistant manager at the Ellanay and has 
pinch-hit as manager of the Palace and 
Wigwam Theatres in El Paso. At present 
he is acting assistant at the Ellanay. Mack 
has a flair for publicity stunts and we be- 
lieve we can look forward to some interest- 
ing contributions from him In the near 
future. 

V 

J. R. EMAMOODEN 

is In charge of the film distribution de- 
partment of the Peacock Motion Picture 
Company, Inc., of Shanghai, China, and 
we are glad to welcome him as a new 
member of this international organization 
of showmen. He takes care of all booking 
of American and British pictures for the 
thirty-odd houses under his company's 
control and ought to be In a good posi- 
tion to contribute a lot of Interesting news 
of what's going on in showbusiness over 
in his section of the world. Foreign ex- 
ploitation of pictures Is always interesting 
to our many readers and we'll be on the 
lookout for photographs and detailed in- 
formation of campaigns. 



HERE'S THE BLANK 



APPLICATION FOR 
MEMBERSHIP 

MANAGERS' ROUND 
TABLE CLUB 

Hey, ''Chick*': 

Please enroll me in the Club and 
send me my framed certificate. 

Ntme 

Posilion 

Theatre 

Address 

Oty 

Sttte 

(Mail to Managers' Round Table Club, 
1790 Broadway, New York) 



GENE PARRISH 

Is assistant manager of the Tennessee 
Theatre, a house operated by Valatenga 
Theatres In Knoxvlile, Tenn., and we're 
mighty glad to list his name among this 
week's new members. He Is heartily In 
accord with the work being carried on 
by this department and proposes to do 
his share of It In the future. Gene sends 
us word that Harry Hardy Is now city 
manager for R. B. WIlby in Knoxvlile. 
Our best wishes to him and ask him to 
drop the Club a line once in awhile, If 
he can find the time after looking after 
three houses! 

V 

A. L. LA SALLE 

Is the skipper of the Fox-Whiteway Theatre 
out in Fredonla, Kansas, and we're happy 
to record that he, too, has joined the 
fastest stepping army of showmen in the 
world. He has found this department 
profitable In the past and now wants to 
help keep the ball rolling along by con- 
tributing some accounts of his own ex- 
periences in the show-selling game. Okay, 
LaSalle, shoot along your Ideas. We'll 
see that the other fellows are tipped off. 

V 

GORDON WOODRUFF 

manages the Caldwell Theatre in St. 
Joseph, Mich., and he's another new 
Round Tabler In line for introduction to 
his brother showmen In this organization. 
Welcome to the gang, Woodruff, and now 
let's see what you can do to help carry 
on the work being done by this depart- 
ment. What was that last stunt you used 
to good success at the box office of the 
Caldwell? Jot down an account of it and 
shoot It along for the benefit of your fel- 
low members. 

V 

C. A. STEWART 

halls from out in Marysvllle, Kansas, where 
he manages the Fox-Liberty Theatre for 
Fox-MIdwesco, and a cordial welcome Is 
also extended this member of our organ- 
ization. There's a large flock of Fox men 
listed In the Round Table Club and a 
majority of them have been steadfast 
contributors to this department. Let's 
hope that Stewart will strive his best to 
keep up the standard set by brother man- 
agers on his circuit. 

V 

C. E. BEACH 

confesses that he's been using a number 
of the show-selling ideas contributed by 
other Round Tablers and forthwith sends 
along his application for membership In 
the organization, with the determination 
to now do his share of the work being 
carried on by this department. He owns 
and manages the Silvertown Theatre. 
Thomaston, Ga., a house that has every- 
thing in the way of modern equipment. 
We're glad to welcome him into the fold. 



80 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 



WABASH AVENUE ON BROADWAY NEWS PICTURES 



CHICAGO 

The local theatre situation seems to have 
straightened itself out, temporarily at least. 
Oriental is definitely set as the long run B & K 
loop picture house. United Artists and State- 
Lake reopened Christmas, the latter with a 
straight picture policy. There only remains 
the question of what will be done with Mc- 
Vickers, the lease on which is not being re- 
newed by Balaban & Katz. The house is 
owned by Publix and B & K has been sub- 
leasing it. 

V 

Ralph Poucher of Consolidated Film Labora- 
tories was a visitor along the Row on his 
return to New York from the West Coast. 
V 

Two well-known local personalities have en- 
tered the state rights field. Ben Serkowich, 
until recently with Balaban & Katz, has ac- 
quired eastern rights for "The Big Drive," the 
A. L. Rule war film which created such a 
sensation at McVickers. Madeline Woods, who 
for many years has had charge of publicity 
and advertising for Great States Theatres, has 
acquired a number of middlewest states for 
the same picture. Serkowich left for New 
York last week. 

V 

J. E. Williamson, producer of "With Wil- 
liamson Beneath the Sea," made a personal 
appearance at the Castle theatre in connection 
with the opening of the picture there Decem- 
ber 25. Henri Ellman of Capitol Film Cor- 
poration, distributor of the film in Illinois and 
Indiana, announces that it is set for a long 
run at the Castle. 

V 

Of interest to exhibitors is a device described 
by Dr. William Feinbloom of New York at a 
convention of optometrists at the Palmer House 
last week. This device, a new type of tele- 
scopic lens, will enable persons with only two 
per cent vision to enjoy motion picture shows. 
A quarter million people or more will be able 
to use the new lens viewing picture shows, Dr. 
Feinbloom declared. 

V 

Yule parties at theatres about town for chil- 
dren and unfortunate adults was the order of 
the past week. Practically all the Balaban 
& Katz houses cooperated with the Chicago 
American in a series of neighborhood matinees 
while many other houses cooperated with local 
organizations in spreading Christmas cheer in 
their communities. 

V 

Ed Lowry, who has been holding forth as 
master of ceremonies at the Oriental, has been 
shifted to the Chicago theatre. 

HOLQUIST 



Voight Returns to Post 

Hubert Voight has returned to the Col- 
umbia Coast studio as head of the publicity 
department, replacing Cliff Lewis, tem- 
porarily in charge, who returns to New 
York shortly. George Brown, director of 
advertising and publicity, has returned to 
the home office. 



Master Arts Opens Branch 

Master Arts Products, Inc., subsidiary 
recently divorced from National Screen 
Service, Inc., and headed by "E" Schwartz, 
has opened a branch office in Chicago. 
Harry Schwartz and Henry Reiner handled 
the branch opening. 



Universal In Name Shift 

Universal Chain Theatres Enterprises, 
Inc., has changed its name to Chain The- 
atrical Enterprises, Inc., of New York, at 
Dover, Del. 



Week of December 24 



CAPITOL 

Toy Parade MGM 

HOLLYWOOD 

The Red Shadow Vitaphone 

MAYFAIR 

Screen Snapshots — No. 5. . . Columbia 

Silvery Moon RKO Radio 

The Iceman's Ball... RKO Radio 

PARAMOUNT 

Human Fish Paramount 

Screen Souvenirs — No. 7. . . Paramount 

RIVOLI 

Hawaiian Fantasy Paramount 

Mickey's Good Deed United Artists 

Rio the Magnificent MGM 

ROXY 

Glad Rags to Riches Educational 

Santa's Workshop United Artists 

STRAND 

From Bethlehem to Jerusa- 
lem Vitaphone 

Shanty Where Santa Claus 

Lives Vitaphone 



Allied Will Have Thirteen 
Films Ready by January I 

M. H. Hoffman, president of Allied Pic- 
tures Corporation, has announced that 
more than one-half of the 26 features for the 
1932-33 season will be completed and re- 
leased between October 1 and January of 
next year. The schedule includes six Stage 
Classics, four specials, four Monte Blue 
specials, eight Hoot Gibson specials and 
four Classay melodramas. 

The following are completed or ready 
for immediate production : "Unholy Love," 
"A Parisian Romance," "The Iron Master," 
"The Intruder," "The Boiling Point," 
"Cowboy Counsellor," "Boots of Destiny," 
"Officer 13," "Anna Karenina," "A Man's 
Land," 'Vanity Fair," "The Stoker" and 
"File 113." 



Heads Cleveland Exhibitors 

Ernest Schwartz, Cleveland attorney, has 
been elected president of the Cleveland Mo- 
tion Picture Exhibitors Association. Other 
officers for the new term are : Albert E. 
Ptak, vice-president ; John Kalafat, treas- 
urer ; George W. Erdmann, secretary and 
business manager. E. C. Flanigon, Henry 
Greenberger, Sigmund Vermes, M. B. Hor- 
witz and Morris Berkowitz were elected 
members of the board of directors. 



Establish Trailer Firm 

The Motion Picture Service Corporation 
has been incorporated in Denver to con- 
duct a general trailer business and produce 
industrial and advertising films. Incorpora- 
tors are James W. Aubrey, H. H. Panzlan 
and J. R. Peele. 



Fox Theatres Offices Move 

Fox Theatres offices have been moved to 
1560 Broadway, New York, from 729 
Seventh avenue. 



FOX MOVIETONE NEWS— No. 27— Snow storm 
hits New York — Miami Beach Surf Club is popular 
with men — Roosevelt greets campaign aids in 
New York — Hollywood picks "Wampas Babies" — 
California frees liquor violators — Londos wins 
wrestling match at Los Angeles. 

FOX MOVIETONE NEWS— No. 28— Congress 
passes Leer bill — New York dry agents destroy 
liquor seizure — Seattle airmen go over Mt. Rainier — 
— Great Britain and United States pledge world 
peace — Auto race held at Los Angeles— Winter 
sport season here again — Child of three plays ac- 
cordion. 

HEARST METROTONE NEWS— No. 226— Beer bill 
passes House — Prohibition agents destroy liquor 
seized in New York — Mexicans hold church fete — 
United States joins Europe for world peace — Baby 
submarine tested in Pelham Bay, New York — News 
thrills of 1932. 

HEARST METROTONE NEWS — No. 227 — Plows 
battle blizzard at Snoqualmie Pass, Wash. — Athletic 
meet held at Meji Stadium, Tokyo — Mine explosion 
at Moweaqua, 111., kills many — Broadway enter- 
tains youngsters at Metropolitan Hospital, New 
York — jclm D. Rockefeller plays golf at Ormond 
Beach, Florida — Aerial daredevils thrill Germans — 
Chicago fire takes two lives. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS— No. 41— Indians at Dulce, 
N. M., get $50,000 sheep loan— Ellis Island situation 
explained by Commissioner Edward Corsi — News 
highlights of the year gone by — France inaugurates 
classes for orphans of officers. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS— No. 42— Fort Russell, Texas, 
cavalrymen abandon mounts for armored motors — 
Parley cheers French— Slot machine feeds animals 
in London Zoo — Trans-United States air service 
opens — Hollywood children welcome 1933 — Governor 
Moore frees Robert E. Burns; Georgia protests 
against decision. 

PATHE NEWS— No. 42— Snow blankets nation- 
Beach fashion show held at Miami Beach — Chorus 
sings atop Radio City Music Hall in New York — 
New York holds stein-carrying contest — Jim Londos 
victor in wrestling match at Los Angeles — Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Hoover dedicate new government 
building in Washington — News flashes. 

PATHE NEWS— No. 43— Radio star entertains kids 
in Florida — Test baby submarine off New York — 
Newton D. Baker says 200,000 boys roaming United 
States— Captain Bob Bartlett ends trip on Peary 
Expedition trail — Chain gang fugitive freed — New 
York liquor seizure destroyed — New Yorker sails 
to play violin for English royalty — News flashes. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSPAPER NEWSREEI^No. 104— 
House passes beer bill — Highlights in news of 1932 — 
Sonnenberg beats Cbinese wrestler in match at 
New York — Spills mark Los Angeles auto race. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSPAPER NEWSREEL— No. 105 
— Forty bodies recovered from mine disaster at 
Moweaqua, 111. — Columbia River freezes — Los An- 
geles dry law prisoners set free — Canadians beat 
Americans in hockey game at New York — Chicago 
fire disaster kills one — Odd bits in today's news. 



Freuler in New York on Trip 
For Story Conference 

John R. Freuler, president of Freuler 
Film Associates, has arrived in New York 
to confer with Charles L. Glett, vice-presi- 
dent ; the heads of Monarch's eastern dis- 
tributors, and several exhibitors on current 
trends in story material. 

Freuler said that last minute changes are 
becoming more and more important in de- 
veloping stories for the screen, because of 
the rapid, right-about-face attitude of the 
public. 



Gould Forms New Company 

Symon Gould has established the Mara- 
thon Film Company, with New York of- 
fices at 723 Seventh avenue. Arnold Lopa- 
bevi, with offices in several European capi- 
tals, is associated with Mr. Gould. Plans 
are underway for distribution of the first 
two releases, "Richthofen, the Red Ace of 
Germany" and "Man Eaters of the South 
Seas." 



Vitaphone Studio to Close 6 Weeks 

Five short subjects will be made at the 
Vitaphone studio in Brooklyn before it 
ceases production on January 14th for six 
weeks. 



December 3 1, I 932 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



81 



STAGE ATTCACTICNS 

r€C PICTURE THEATCES 



INSTRUMENTAL 

Paul Ash & Orchestra 

ZVeii' York Capitol 

After an absence of two years from Broad- 
way, Paul Ash returns better than ever. His 
orchestra is composed of a group of accom- 
plished musicians and entertainers. Prominent 
among them is Hal Menken, the guitar player, 
whose stair dance drew a resounding recep- 
tion. The versatile orchestra modulates from 
the melodic "Play Fiddle Play," to the syn- 
copated "St. Louis Blues," with ease, offering 
a full twenty minutes of entertainment. Jerry 
Frank and Julia Brennan also share in the 
applause for their novel bit entitled a "Radio 
Romance." This act rates on top. — H. P. 



Horace Heidt and His Californians 
San Francisco Golden Gate 

Varied and spirited stage fare is offered, 
ranging from the "Dance of the Hours," with 
special effects, to "Schnitzlbank," in which the 
audience joins. Those in the first row receive 
pretzels and something that looks like beer. 

CCMEDy 

Claude and Clarence Stroud 
Buffalo Buffalo 

These identical twins act as joint masters of 
ceremonies for the show titled "Sweet and 
Lovely." Their flow of fast wit may be a 
heritage from their recent sojourn with Earl 
Carroll's "Vanities" ; but wherever they got 
it, it is novel and surefire. Their dance num- 
ber brought great applause and they also used 
Peggy Chamberlin as a stooge to good 
advantage. 



Dick Henderson 
Baltimore Hippodrome 

A comedy monologue is offered after Hen- 
derson enters singing from the wings. He has 
a manner of cracking jokes and then offering 
asides about their reception which draws laughs. 
He finishes with singing "Tiptoe Through the 
Tulips" to good applause. The audience was 
small but he gradually warmed them until they 
were laughing heartily. 



Teddy Joyce 
Buffalo Buffalo 

Acting as master of ceremonies for the 
"Hollywood Fun Jamboree" revue, Joyce dis- 
played versatility as violinist, dancer and gag- 
ger, and won the audience from the start. 
Joyce could have had all the applause he 
wanted, but preferred to keep things moving at 
top speed, building up the applause for other 
acts. 



Kirby and Duvall 
Baltimore Hippodrome 

Comedy and songs are offered in an entertain- 
ing manner that proved successful with the 
audience. 



Copyright Music 
Issue in Canada 

The right of a theatre to show a film in 
which is reproduced a copyrighted song for 
which the theatre has not obtained the per- 
forming rights is at stake in injunction pro- 
ceedings currently before the superior court 
in Montreal. 

In the action the Canadian Performing 
Rights Society, Ltd., asks the United 
Amusement Corporation, Ltd., be re- 
strained from using parts of a musical 
number as part oi the orchestral accom- 
paniment in the film "Blondie of the Fol- 
lies." The society is copyright owner of 
3,000,000 musical numbers and had re- 
quested 10 cents per seat per year from the 
theatre company for use of the entire copy- 
right list in its Montreal theatres. The the- 
atre owners had refused, but had offered 
five cents per seat per year. 

The circuit contends that an injunction 
was an improper proceeding; that the 
proper procedure required the society to 
bill the theatre owners for the license fee 
chargeable for the musical numbers con- 
cerned. The society claims the copyright 
owner is entitled to protect his property 
from use by unauthorized persons. The 
case was taken under advisement by the 
court. 



Ten Are Elected +o Academy 

Ten new members were elected last week 
to three branches of the Academy of Mo- 
tion Picture Arts and Sciences. George 
Bancroft, Sylvia Sidney, Spencer Tracy 
and Loretta Young were elected members of 
the actors' branch ; William V. Mong, asso- 
ciate. Technicians elected were Harry L. 
Decker, Martin G. Cohn and Barney Wolf; 
writers, Samuel Marx and Gertrude Pur- 
cell. 



Courboin To Design Organs 

Sir Charles Courboin, internationally 
known organist and composer, has been ap- 
pointed head of the department of design 
for George Kilgen & Son, Inc., pipe organ 
builders. His work, it has been announced, 
will be so arranged that he can continue 
his recitals. 



McLaglen To Tour Vaudeville 

Victor McLaglen, Fox star, will appear 
in vaudeville in a sketch he has written. At 
present he is at work in "Hot Pepper," the 
new Flagg-Quirt picture with Edmund 
Lowe and Lupe Velez. He expects to be 
on tour early in 1933. 



DANCERS 

O'Connor Family (4) 

Buffalo Buffalo 

Two boys and an attractive blonde sister, 
also their remarkably young-appearing bru- 
nette mother, who they say taught them to 
dance, offer a fast series of tap and acrobatic 
steps. Particularly sensational is the cartwheel 
and somersault work of the taller of the two 
young men. They were well received. 



Four Flash Devils 
Baltimore Hippodrome 

This colored foursome offers some speedy 
stepping that the audience liked and applauded. 



Chamberlin & Himes 
Buffalo Buffalo 

In "Reverse on the Apache," this mixed duo 
have a lowdown dance routine that won in- 
stant and lasting audience approval. The apti- 
tude of the name is beyond question. 



NCVELTT 



Blanche Sweet 
Buffalo Buffalo 

The former silent screen star shows her ver- 
satility in a revuette, "Sweet and Lovely," in 
which she sings, emotes and dances. Miss 
Sweet's speaking and singing voice is suffi- 
ciently true and strong to carry into the gal- 
leries without the aid of microphones, quite 
a feat for any woman performer in this huge 
theater, but especially so for a screen star. 
With the aid of two men, she does the renun- 
ciation scene from "Anna Christie," giving it 
great dramatic intensity. She also sings and 
exchanges badinage with Al Rinker, one of 
Paul Whiteman's ex-Rhythm Boys, and appears 
in a waltz number with Loc Lorraine that 
brought salvos of applause. Amazingly youth- 
ful in appearance, with a sylphlike figure, judi- 
ciously chosen costumes and undiminished 
vivacity. Miss Sweet impressed this audience as 
few "personal appearances" have done. 



Daveys (2) 

San Francisco Golden Gate 

These jugglers certainly have the goods and 
know how to handle them. Nothing in the 
juggling line seems too difficult for them and 
the applause breaks before thay have com- 
pleted one of them. Another feature is their 
clever way of introducing a comedy turn occa- 
sionally and getting a laugh to break the ten- 
sion. 



Ted Claire 

Oakland Fox-Oakla?id 

Ted Claire acts as master of ceremonies for 
the stage offering "Tahiti" and does a good job 
of it, too. He gets a great hand for himself 
when he takes the part of a derelict in a great 
city, offering as an encore an imitation of Al 
Jolson. 



ATTENTION EXHIBITORS BOOKING TALENT! This department aims to serve you in booking 
acts. We have on file the information on how to get in touch with any act reviewed. Write 
to Stage Attractions Department, Motion Picture Herald, 1790 Broadway, New Yoric City. 



82 



MOTION PICTURE H ERALD 



December 3 1, I 932 



OP STAGE ATTCACTI€N§ QP 



WILD OSCAR (New York Loew's 17Sth), 
assisted by Egon Dougherty at the organ, pre- 
sented an interesting and plenty entertaining 
novelty this week. Oscar's usual announcement 
slide opens the solo, but to the surprise of the 
audience a stranger is seated at the organ. 
They weren't sure of their eyes until Oscar 
stepped into the spotlight and introduced his 
pal, Dougherty, who, he announced, would play 
all the numbers as he, Oscar, circulated through 
the audience and had different people sing into 
the mike. Oscar had about fifty feet of wire 
on the hand mike, and a lot of fun was had 
when different patrons sang. Some of them 
were exceptionally good and others were atro- 
cious, but everybody was entertained. Oscar 
and Dougherty received good applause at the 
grand finale. 



TED MEYN (Jersey City Jersey) again 
oi¥ered an organ novelty that proved entertain- 
ing and had the entire audience singing, whole- 
heartedly. Opening with an oral introduction in 
which he agreed to gratify the audience's desire 
for oldtimers, which they had requested, he 
went directly into "Old Apple Tree," "There 
Are Smiles," "Wabash Moon" and "Margie." 
For the closing group Ted offered "Sure of 
Everything But You," "Up and Down the 
Hill" and closed with "Put Out the Lights." 
A lot of laughs and fun was had in the singing 
of the special lyrics to the next to closing 
song. Meyn still rates the good applause given 
him at the finish of his novelties. 



WINIFRED REN WORTH (Seattle Fox) 
recently presented a "Chinese Fantasy" solo 
that met a very favorable reception. A special 
Chinese setting was created by the use of a few 
lanterns and Chinese embroideries, and Miss 
Renworth wore a Chinese costume. The solo 
opened with "In a Chinese Temple Garden," 
followed by a few bars of an original Chinese 
melody adapted by Miss Renworth. "China 
Girl" was the next number featured, in fox 
trot tempo, to be followed by the plaintive 
"Chinese Lullaby" from "East Is West." The 
number was blended into the finale which in- 
troduced Kreisler's "Tambourine Chinois." 
Further atmospheric effect was gained by the 
use of decorative Chinese slides flashed on the 
grand drapery. 



ART THOMPSON (Utirichsville State) who 
returned to this theatre Thanksgiving Day, of- 
fered for his solo a novelty written for the 
occasion, entitled "Here I Am Again." Thomp- 
son, who was quite popular here on his pre- 
vious engagement, returned to an audience 
who knew him and welcomed him back with 
real applause. 

Thompson's numbers were "Rock-a-bye 
Moon," "Sidewalks of New York," "Here's 
Hoping" and "Shanty-town." Two special 
parodies on old numbers took care of the com- 
edy angle and had the entire audience in a 
laughing mood. 



HARRY F. PEARL (Buffalo Kensington) 
recently offered an outstanding novelty that 
incorporated surprise and comedy. Pearl was 
dressed in oriental fashion, with a huge tur- 
ban on his head. As he played and gazed into 
a crystal the first three slides explained that 
the audience were to concentrate on one of six 
songs listed on screen. As these were played, 
Pearl won much laughter with his clever 
comedy, between songs. For a close, he had 
the audience whistle the first chorus of 
"Couldn't Say Goodby" and sing the last. 
The entire solo ran but 8 minutes and gained 
plenty applause. 



UP AND DOWN 
THE ALLEY 



Well, here it is, the end of another year, 
and I can hear a million voices shouting, 
"Tlmnk Goodness." . . . We'Ve all suffered 
this past year, some of us more than others, 
but we must sell ourselves on the idea that 
1933 will bring us all back on top. . . . 
We've got to start out with renewed energy 
and all try to help get things back to normal 
(Gosh, I hope you don't think I have taken 
a "shot" in the arm). . . . Listen, guy, I've 
had my share of being in the "dumps" too, 
but honestly, after reading the above, it's 
kind of given me a different outlook toward 
the future and a feeling that we'll all make 
the grade this year. . . . 

V 

In the past two years about three hun- 
dred organists throughout the country have 
signed their names on a plaque in Harry 
Blair's office which has as its title, "The 
Noon-Day Club." This was all started in 
fun, and an excuse to get together at lunch- 
eon time . . . but now . . . Harry Blair has 
started out on his own and "The Noon-Day 
Club" has become an actuality. . . . Blair, 
who is affectionately known as "Pop," has 
brought to a head an idea that this same 
club, started as a gag, could become of vital 
importance to every organist in the coun- 
try . . . and believe you me, this service 
that Harry Blair and his "Noon-Day Club" 
is going to give to the members of his 
club, will not only be a life-saver to every 
organist, but will, without a doubt, help 
enormously in putting you fellows back as 
the important attractions in theatres. . . . 

V 

Paul Whiteman . . . Guy Lombardo . . . 
Bing Crosby . . . Connie Boswell . . . Russ 
Colombo . . . Morton Downey . . . and a 

number of lesser known lights sure think 
pretty highly of the new Feist song, "Street 
of Dreams," which was written by those 
two fine composers, Victor Young and Sam 
Lewis. . . . All of them have recorded the 
number and have sung it many times over 
the air. . . . The song has a beautiful mel- 
ody and its lyrics are full of sentiment, just 
the thing for this time of the year. . . . 

V 

Paul Ash, currently playing the Capitol, 
has an aggregation that is the best he has 
ever had. . . . They were all hand-picked 
by Ash and all of them are clever entertain- 
ers, besides being darned good musicians. 
. . . Here is an outfit that should have a 
big spot on the air, and by the old grape- 
vine, I hear that it will have shortly. . . . 

V 

Closing with a sincere wish for a pros- 
perous New Year, I am your humble scribe. 

ED. DAWSON 



Offers Theatre Course 

A new course, "The Art of the Theatre," 
has been instituted by the University of 
California Extension Division. It will be 
offered by Sheldon Cheney, author of "The 
Art Theatre," "Stage Decoration" and "The 
Theatre," and editor and founder of the 
Theatre Arts Monthly. 



€VECTIJCt$ 

CHARLES PAUL (New York Jamaica 
Valencia) recently presented an overture, com- 
piled of old and new Berlin songs, and entitled 
"Irving Berlin's Melodies." 

Opening with a snappily played rendition of 
"Alexander's Rag-Time Band," Paul conducted 
his aggregation in "Remember," "Puttin' on 
the Ritz," "How Deep Is the Ocean" (on this 
number Paul vocalizes in a surprisingly fine 
voice and draws heavy applause). An instru- 
mental trio next played "Say It Isn't So," fol- 
lowed by a violin solo of "Russian Lullaby," 
at the end of which a special arrangement is 
used for closing. Paul deserves special mention 
for his fine conducting, showmanly style of 
working and pleasing voice. 



HERSCHEL LEIB (Detroit Fox) opens 
his program of the week with a medley of "Over 
There," "Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old 
Kit Bag," "Where Do We Go From Here" and 
"Hinckey Dinkey Parlez Vous." This is fol- 
lowed by an artillery transition and the appear- 
ance of a mixed company of twenty on the 
stage, singing "Keep the Home Fires Burn- 
ing," "Roses of Picardy" and "My Buddy," 
trailing off into "Taps," which is fol- 
lowed by a stage tableaux depicting soldiers 
marching off a battlefield against a background 
of flashing and thundering artillery. The sec- 
ond part of Lieb's program features Irene 
Kessler, radio blues singer with a lively per- 
sonality. Her songs, "Between the Devil and 
the Deep Blue Sea" and "You've Got Me 
Worryin' For You," are eminently suited to 
her style. 



CHARLIE DAVIS (Milwaukee Wisconson) 
and his Gloonichasers include several comedy 
novelty bits in connection with their selections. 
The one offering is good for plenty of laughs 
and features a lesson in which several mem- 
bers of the band teach one of their number the 
intricacies in playing the cymbals. The Wis- 
consin male chorus of 16 voices renders "Bells 
of St. Mary" and "Anchors Aweigh," accom- 
panied by the band in a highly acceptable 
manner. 



LOU FORBES (Detroit Michigan) plays 
an orchestral arrangement of some of the best 
known violin solos. Included in this number 
are Toselli's "Serenade," Drdla's "Souvenir," 
Kreisler's "Liebesfreud" and Massenet's "Medi- 
tation," from "Thais" — this last selection being 
in the form of a violin solo, played by Forbes 
himself and bringing considerable applause. 
This is followed by a fast-stepping number 
called "Louisiana Hay Ride." Lee Mason sings 
while the rest of the orchestra cuts a series of 
typical "Forbesque" capers. 



RUSS MORGAN (Detroit Fox) opens with 
a medley of Southern melodies, including 
"Swanee River" and "Kentucky Home." The 
Fox Choral Singers appear in Colonial dress 
in a setting backed by a mansion and surround- 
ing estate. The first number is the stirring 
"'Way Down South," followed by a_ harmonious 
version of "Going Home." There is a flash of 
contrast between "Old Virginny" and the ap- 
pearance of three colored tap dancers following 
this melancholy number. A male quartet gives 
a fair rendition of "All God's Chillun." The 
final choral number is "Dixie." Alluring Irene 
Kessler, using the organ console for back- 
ground, sings "Say It Isn't So" and "Three's 
a Crowd." 



December 3 1, I 932 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



83 



TCCHNCLCeiCAL 



iiiiiiiii'iiiiiii 



lllllill! 



TWO EXCEPTIONS TO REPLIES 



By F. H. RICHARDSON 



BLUEBOOK SCHOOL QUESTION NO. 153.— (A) Name the various things that will operate to increase resistance 
in a water pipe. In an electrical conductor. [Better think that one over a bit.] (B) What deternnines the necessary 
size of a water pipe or of an electrical conductor? (C) At what point does overload begin in an electric conduc- 
tor? Nanne the various reasons why an electric conductor should never be appreciably overloaded. 



Former Projectionist 
Answers Question 144 

Lewis O'Harra, Eagle Rock, California, 
writes a friendly letter setting forth the fact 
that while he is no longer a projectionist, he 
nevertheless still retains interest and finds 
my department of particular interest. He is 
now a station operator for the Department 
of Water and Power, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. The station is supplied with three- 
phase power at 35,000 volts, which is 
stepped down to 4,600 volts by two banks of 
transformers of 10,000 KVA capacity. 

O'Harra submits an answer to Bluebook 
School question 144, the answer to which 
appeared in the November 26 issue. He 
says : 

"I wish to take some exception to the 
answer to section "B" (in November 26 
issue of the Motion Picture Herald). The 
question is 'Suppose we have two high volt- 
age electric generators of equal voltage and 
capacity. We connect their poles together : 
positives and negatives to like poles, or the 
other way around. What will happen?' 

"With positive and negative poles of one 
machine connected to like poles of the other 
and their voltages equal is the only way two 
generators can be run together on a parallel 
system. The only difference between the 
condition in the question and the usual set 
up is that there is no load or line to carry a 
load. In the case of compound wound ma- 
chines there will have to be an equalizing 
connection between the two machines to 
keep the voltages of the two machines equal. 
If this connection is not provided the two 
machines will not remain at the same volt- 
age and very quickly, things will happen. 
This equalizing connection is connected be- 
tween the commutator brushes and the series 
winding on each machine. Shunt wound 
machines will run without this connection. 
Another thing is that the two machines need 
not be of the same capacity but their volt- 
ages must be the same. 

"There may be an interchange of current 
between the two machines when there is no 
load on account of the voltages not being 
perfectly balanced, but if the voltages are 
perfectly balanced the voltage of one ma- 
chine will neutralize that of the other and no 
current will flow. If a load is connected, the 
current required for this load will be divided 



between the two machines in proportion to 
their capacities provided they have the same 
characteristics. 

"The second part of section 'B' was not 
answered in the November 26 issue ; that is, 
where the positive and negative poles of one 
machine are connected to the opposite poles 
of the other machine. This would produce 
the most perfect short circuit one could im- 
agine. However, if the positive of one ma- 
chine was connected to the negative of the 
other machine and the other connection left 
open, the voltage across the two machines 
would be equal to the sum of the voltages of 
the two machines whether they were equal 
or not. 

"In section 'C the answer is correct as 
far as the equipment connected to this sys- 
tem is concerned, but in high voltage sys- 
tems it is very dangerous if not fatal for a 
person to stand on the ground and touch a . 
bare wire or connection on such a system, 
no matter how thoroughly such a system 
may be insulated. There is a charge super- 
imposed on all high voltage systems that 
workmen have to protect themselves from. 
I have never heard a satisfactory explana- 
tion of this condition. The workmen call 
it static." 

We all thank friend O'Harra. I was not 
myself aware of the static effect he de- 
scribes. When I asked the question I had 
in mind only emphasizing the fact that 
either side of an electric generator has 
absolutely no affinity for earth or anything 
else except the opposite polarity of the same 
generator. 

However, while in theory, omitting the 
effect described, it might be safe to stand on 
wet earth and pick up one raw wire of a 
high tension system, I can assure O'Harra 
I'm going to let some other chap do it, if 
any. The insulation might not be so darned 
perfect and as an electric torch I'm afraid 
I'd not be a pronounced success ! Too 
fleshy. Make too much smoke. 

Another Criticizes, 
Defines Several Terms 

Nicholas J. Tedesco, presumably a projec- 
tionist, Hartford, Connecticut, exercises his 
pen as follows, though I do not know to 
just what article he refers : 

"Replying to the projectionist who appar- 
ently has the idea that we burn voltage in- 
stead of amperes, the following may help 



him. Voltage — the electro magnetic force 
of a circuit (E. M. F.) is that electric pres- 
sure which causes a current to flow in a 
closed circuit. The practical unit of E. M. F. 
is the volt, which is the electrical pressure 
which will cause one ampere to flow through 
one ohm resistance. The E. M. F. of a 
circuit is the voltage of that circuit. 

"An ampere is the practical unit of elec- 
tric current — volume of flow. It is the cur- 
rent produced in a closed circuit under a 
pressure of one volt, the resistance of that 
circuit being one ohm. It is that quantity 
of current which will deposit .005084 of a 
grain of copper per second. It is one-tenth 
of the absolute C. G. S. unit of current 
strength. Amperes equals pressure in volts 
divided by resistance in ohms. Volts equals 
amperes multiplied by ohms. Ohms equals 
volts divided by amperes." 

Really I am not able to remember where 
any one has claimed that only volts are used 
in power production, but nevertheless in a 
way that is the fact. I have used this letter 
to bring out that point. True all three 
quantities are interdependent upon each 
other, but just the same when it comes right 
down to brass tacks it is pressure that pro- 
duces power, either in electricity, water or 
steam. True pressure could not act without 
the thing we call "current" and measure in 
amperes. No one yet knows for sure what 
it is, but without it E. M. F. could not per- 
form work. Without resistance we could 
not have either incandescent or arc lights, 
at least by any method yet known. 

The fact remains, however, that while all 
three quantities are interdependent to such 
an extent that neither could produce results 
without the other, when we simmer it all 
down, it is pressure that actually produces 
results. It is the effort of the current 
(whatever that is) to dissipate its pressure 
that makes the old arc burn, or the incan- 
descent film to glow or the motor to pro- 
duce power, and that is that. 



Westinghouse Elects Two 

C. E. Stephens, former commercial vice 
president of Westinghouse Electric and 
Manufacturing Company, and N. G. Sy- 
monds, former commercial vice president in 
Chicago, were named vice presidents of the 
company at a board of directors meeting 
last week. Mr. Symonds will be in charge 
of sales. 



84 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 31, 1932 




THE I^ELEASE CHART 



Productions are listed according to the names of distributors in order that the exhibitor may have a short-cut towards such infor- 
mation as he may need, as well as information on pictures that are coming. Features which are finished or are in work, but to 
which release dates have not been assigned, are listed in "Coming Attractions." Running times are those supplied by the 
distributors. Where they vary, the change is probably due to local censorship deletions. Dates are 1932, unless otherwise specified 



ALLIED PICTURES 



Features 



Title Star 

A Man's Land Hoot Gibson-Marion Shilling.. .June 

Boiling Point, The Hoot Gibson-Helen Foster .July 

Cowboy Counsellor Hoot Gibson-Sheila Manners. ... Oct. 

Intruder, The Monte Blue-Lila Lee Dec. 

Iron Master, The Lila Lee-Reginald Denny Nov. 

Officer 13 Monte Blue-Lila Lee Nov, 

Parisian Romance, A Lew Cody- Marion Shilling Oct. 

Stoker, The Monte Blue-Dorothy Burgess. . .June 

Unholy Love H. B. Warner-Lila Lee June 



Coming Feature Attractions 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

...65 June II 

. ..70.... July 23 
...63 Oct. 8 



1 1 . 
15... 
15... 
26... 



26... 

I... 
15... 

I... 



69 Dec. 

67 Dec. 

77.... Sent. 

70 June 

78. ...July 



10 

3 
17 
25 

9 



A Shriek in the Night 

Anna Karenina 

Beyond the Law 

Boots of Destiny Hoot Gibson 

Davy Jones' Locker 

Eleventh Commandment 

Midnight Alarm 

Nestors, The Monte Blue 

Pullman Car 

Red Kisses 

Slightly Us«d 

Three Castles 

Valley of Adventure, The Monte Blue 

Without Children 



ARTCLASS PICTURES 



Features 

Running Time 

Title Star ReL Date Minutes Reviewed 

Night Rider. The Harry Carey June 72 

They Never Come Back Regis Toomey-Dorothy Sebastian .May 63 June II 



Coming Feature Attractions 

Across the Line Harry Carey 

Double Sixes Harry Carey 

Horsehoofs Harry Carey 

Hurricane Rider, The Harry Carey 



COLUMBIA 

Features 



Rel. 



Title Star 

American Madness Walter Huston-C. Cummlngs 

K. Johnson Aug. 

By Whose Hand? Ben Lyon-Barbara Weeks July 

Deception Leo Carrlllo- Barbara Weeks- 
Nat Pendleton Nov. 

Forbidden Trail Buck Jones-Barbara Weeks Nov. 

Hello Trouble Buck Jones-Lina Basouette July 

Last Man, The Chas. Bickford-C. Cummlngs. . .Aug. 

Man Against Woman Jack Holt-Lillian Miles Nov. 

McKenna of the Mounted Buck Jones-Greta Granstedt Aug. 

Night Club Lady, The Adolphe Menlou-Mayo Methot- 

Skeets Gallagher Aug. 

Night Mayer. The Lee Tracy-Evalyn Knapp Aug. 

No More Orchids Carole Lombard-Lyle Talbot Nov. 

Speed Demon Wm. Collier. Jr.-Joan Marsh. ..Nov. 

Sporting Age, This Jack Holt-Evalyn Knapp Sept. 

That's My Boy R. Cromwell-Dorothy Jordan- 
Mae Marsh Oct. 

Two Fisted Law Tim McCoy-Alice Day ....June 

Vanity Street C. BIckford-Helen Chandler Oct. 

Virtue Carole Lombard-Pat O'Brien.. .Oct. 

War Correspondent Jack Holt-Ralph Graves-Llla 

Lee .July 

Washlnilton Merry Go Round.. Lee Traey-C. Cummlngs Oct. 

Western Code. The Tim McCoy-Nora Lane Sent. 

White Eagle Buck Jones-Barbara Weeks Oct. 



Running Time 
Date Minutes Reviewed 



15. 
6. 

4. 
IS. 
15. 
31. 
15. 
26. 

27. 
19. 
25. 
5. 
15. 

6. 
8. 
15. 

25. 

25. 
IS. 
16. 
7. 



..76.... July 
.64 



.67 

.71.... Sent. 24 
.68 Dec. 10 

.66 



.68 Sent. 3 

..68 Dec. 3 

..74.... Nov. 19 

..65.... Nov. 26 

..67 Oct. 15 



.71 Dec. 3 

.57 

.67.... Oct. 29 
.69 Nov. 5 

.77.... Aug. 20 
.78... Oct. I 



.67. 



.Oct. 



Coming Feature Attractions 

Air Hostess Evalyn Knapp-James Murray- 

Thelma Todd 

As the Devil Commands Alan Dlnehart-Nell Hamilton- 
Mae Clarke 

Bitter Tea of General Y«B....B. Stanwyck-Nils Aittier Jan. 6,'33 80. ...Nov. 26 

Brand Inspector, Tho Tim McCoy-Florence Britton 

Brief Moment Barbara Stanwyck 

California Trail, The Buck Jones-Helen Mack 

Child of Manhattan John Boles-Nancy Carroll 

Cornered Tim MeCoy 

Destroyer, The 

East of Fifth Avenue Leo Carrillo-Lols Wilson-Dickie 

Moore 

End of the Trail. The Tim McCoy-Luana Walters 

Fighting for Justice Tim McCoy-Joyce Conpton 

Forgotten Wan. The Jack Holt 

Hurricane Diek Jack Holt 

Man of Action Tim McCoy-Caryl Lincoln 

Mfte 

Parole Girl 

Pearls and Emoraldi 

Rules for Wives 

State Trooper Regis Toomey- Evalyn Knapp 

SundewR Rider, Tho Buck Jones-Barbara Weeks 

That's Africa Bert Wheeler- Robt. Woolsey- 

Raguet Torres 

Treason Buck Jones-Shirley Grey 

Wild Horse Stampede Wm. Janney-Dorothy Appleby 



FIRST DIVISION 



Features 



Title Star 

Condemed to Death Arthur Wontner Sept. 15 

Goona Goona Nov. 25.. 

Monte Carlo Madness Sari Maritza Sept. 15.. 

Ringer, The Franklyn Dyall Sent. 15.. 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

...70 July 23 

. . .65 Aug. 27 

. ..64. ...June II 
. ..60 June II 



FIRST NATIONAL 



Features 

Title Star Rel. 

Cabin In the Cotton Richard Barthelmess Oct. 

Central Park Joan Blondell Dec. 

Crash. The Ruth Chatterton Oct. 

Crooner David Manners Aug. 

Dr. X Lionel Atwill-Fay Wray Aug. 

Life Begins Loretta 

Love Is a Racket Douglas 

Match King. The Warren William-Lill Damita. . . Dec. 

~ G. Robinson Dec. 

Brown June 

Young-Geo. Brent Nov. 



Young-Eric Linden. 
Fairbanks, Jr. 



.Oct. 
.June 



Silver Dollar Edward 

Tenderfoot, The Joe E. 

They Call it Sin Loretta 

Three on a Match Btondell-William-Dvorak-Davis. Oct 

Tiger Shark Edward G. Robinson Sept. 

Two Seconds Edward G. Robinson June 

Week-End Marriage Loretta Young-Norman Foster. . .July 

You Said a Mouthful Joe E. Brown Nov. 



R 

Date 
15... 
10... 

8... 
20... 
27... 

I... 
25... 
31... 
24... 
18... 

5... 
29... 
24... 

4... 

9... 
26... 



unning Time 
Minutes Reviewed 

78.... Sept. 10 

55.... Nov. 19 

58.... Sent. 17 

... ..68 Aug. 6 

77. ...June II 

72.... Aug. 13 

72 June 18 

79.... Dec. 17 

78. ...Nov. 5 

70.... May 28 

74.... Sent. 3 

Oct. I 

80.... Aug. 27 

68.... May 28 

66 June II 

72.... Nov. 19 



Coming Feature Attractions 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



Title Star 

Blondie Johnson Joan Biondell-Chester Morris 

Central Airport Richard Barthelmess 

Elmer the Great Joe E. Brown 

-Employees Entrance ..W. William- Loretta Young Feb 

Ex-Lady Bette Davis-Gene Raymond 

Frisco Jenny Ruth Chatterton Jan. I4,'33 

Mind Reader, The Warren William-C. Cummlngs 

She Had to Say Yes Loretta Young-Lyle Talbot 

20,000 Years in Sing Sing... Bette Davis-Soencer Tracy Jan. I4.'33 Nov. 



1 1. "33 78 Dec. 24 



...76 Dec. 



17 



FOX FILMS 

Features 



TItIo Star Rel. 

Almost Married Violet Hemlng-Ralph Bellamy- 
Alexander KIrkland July 

Bachelor's Affairs Adolohe MenJeu-MInna Gombeli 

Joan Marsh-I. Puroell June 

Call Her Savage Bow-Owsley-Todd-Roland Nov. 

Chandu, The Magician Edmund Lowe-Bela Lugosl- 

.. Irene Ware Sent. 

Congorilla Mr. & Mrs. Martin Johnson. ..Aug. 

Down to Earth Will Rogers-Irene Rich Sent. 

First Year, The Gaynor-Farrell July 

Golden West. The Geo. O'Brien-Janet Chandler* 

Marlon Burns Oct. 

Handle With Care Jas. Dunn-Boots Mallory Dec. 

Hat Check Girl Sally Eilers-Ben Lyon Sept. 

Me and My Gal Joan Bennett-Spencer Tracy... Dec. 

Mystery Ranch Geo. O'Brien-C. Parker June 

Painted Woman, The P. Shannon-Spencer Tracy-Wm. 

Boyd Aug. 

Passport to Hell. A Elissa Landi-Paul Lukas-A 

Kirkland-Warner Gland Aug. 

Rackety Rax Victor McLaglen-Greta Nissen- 

Nell O'Day Oct. 

Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm.. Marian NIxon-R. Bellamy July 

Sherlock Holmes Clive Brook-Miriam Jordan Nov. 

Six Hours to Live Warner Baxter-John Boles-Mir- 
iam Jordan Oct. 

Society Girl J. Dunn-P. Shannon-S. Tracy... May 

Tess of the Storm Country. .. Janet Gaynor-Chas. Farrell Nov. 

Too Busy To Work Will Rogers-Marian Nixon Nov. 

Week Ends Only Joan Bennett-Ben Lyon June 

Wild Girl Joan Bennett-Charles Farrell- 

Ralph Bellamy Oct. 

Coming Feature Attractions 

Broadway Bad Joan Blondell • Ginger Rogers 

RIcardo Cortez Feb. 

Cavalcade Clive Brook-Diana Wynyard 

Dangerously Yours Miriam Jordan-Warner Baxter.. .Jan. 

Face in the Sky Spencer Tracy-Marian Nlxon- 

Stuart Erwin Jan. 

Hot Pepper Victor McLaglen- Edmund Lewe- 

Luoe Velez-EI Brendel Jan. 

Infernal Machine. The Genevieve Tobln-Chester Morris- 
Alexander KIrkland Feb. 

Man-Eater Marion Burns-Kane Richmond 

Paddy. The Next Best Thing.. Janet Gaynor 

Robbers' Roost George O'Brien- Maureen 

O'Sulllvan Jan. 

Second Hand Wife Sally Ellers-Raiph Bellamy Jan. 

Smoke Lightning George O'Brien-Nell O'Day Feb. 

State Fair Janet Gaynor-WIII Rogers-Law 

Ayres-Sally Filers- Norman 

Foster- Frank Craven 

Walking Down Broadway James Dunn-Boots Maliory- 

Zasu Pltts-Mlnna Gombeli 

Zoo In Budapest Gene Raymond 



Running Time 
Date Minutes Reviewed 



17 


....51 . 






26.... 


76.. 


. . June 


18 


27.... 


88.. 


. .Dee. 


3 


18.... 


. . ..74.. 


..Sent. 


17 


7.... 


.. ..72.. 


..July 


16 


4 


73.. 


..July 


23 






..July 


23 


30.... 


.. ..74.. 


..Oct. 


15 


25.... 


.. .75.. 


. . Dec 


24 


25 


....64.. 


..Sent. 


24 


4.... 


...78.. 


. Dec. 


17 


12 


55.. 


. .June 


25 


21.... 


72.. 


..Aug. 


13 


14 


...75.. 


. .Sept. 


3 


23.... 


. ..75.. 


..Oct. 


29 


3.... 


. ..80.. 


..July 


16 


6.... 


69.. 


. . Nov. 


26 


16.... 


.. .80.. 


..Oct. 


29 


29 


.. ..74.. 


..June 


18 


20.... 


75.. 


. . Nov. 


26 


13.... 


70.. 


. . Nov. 


12 


19.... 


70.. 


..June 


li 


9.... 


.. ..74.. 


. . Oct. 


8 



I2.'33., 
29i'33V. 
I5,'33. 
22,'33. 
5,'33. 



8,'33. 
I, '33. 
I9,'33. 



FREULER FILM ASSOCIATES 

Features 



Title 

Fighting Gentleman. 



Running Time 

Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

The Wm. Collier, Jr.-Josephlne 

Dunn-N.Moorhead Oct. 7 65 Oct. 15 

Forty-Nlners. Tho Tom Tyler Oct. 28 59 

Gambling Sex Ruth Hall-Grant Withers Nov. 21 65 

Kiss of Arabv 

Penal Code. The Regis Toomey-Holen Ceban Dec. 23 

Savage GIri, The Rochelle Hudson-Waiter Byron.. Dee. 5 

When a Man Rides Alone Tom Tyler 



December 3 1. I 932 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



85 



(THE RELEASE CHAKT—CCNT'D ) 



MAJESTIC 

Features 

Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Crusader. The Evelyn Brent-H. B. Warner Oct. 1 72 Oct. 8 

Gold Jack Hoxie-Alice Day Sept. 15 53 

Hearts of Humanity Jean Hersholt-Jackie Searl Sept. 1 70 Sept. 24 

Law and Lawless Jack Hoxie-Hilda Moreno Nov. 30 

Outlaw Justice Jack Hoxie-Dorothy Gulliver Oct. 1 61 

Piiantom Express, The Sally Blane-Wm. Collier, Jr Sept. 15 70 Sept. 24 

Unwritten Law. The Greta Nissen-Skeets Gallagher.. . Nov. 15 

Vampire Bat. The Lionel Atwill-Fay Wray Dec. 15 

Via Pony Exprew Jack Hoxie-Marceline Day Dec. 15 

Coming Feature Attractions 

Comeback, The Benny Rubin 

Public Be Damned, The • 

Sing, You Sinner Jan. I5,'33 

Woman in the Chair. The Feb. 15, '33 



MAYFAIR PICTURES 



Features 



Title Star 

Alias Mary Smith Gwen Lee-John Darrow 

Behind Jury Doors Helen Chandler-Wm. Collier. Jr... Dec. 

Gorilla Ship, The Ralph In.e-Vera Reynolds June 

Heart Punch Marion Shilling-L. Hughes Oct. 

Her Mad Night Irene Rich-Conway Tearle Oct. 

Honor of the Press Edw. J. Nugent-Rita La Roy May 

Malay Nights John Mack Brown-D. Burgess- 
Ralph inc Nov, 

Midnight Morals Beryl Mercer-Chas. Delaney- 

Gwen Lee Aug. 

Midnight Warning William Boyd-Claudia Dell Nov. 

No Living Witness Barbara Kent-Gilbert Roland.. .Sept. 

Tangled Destinies Lloyd Whitlock-Doris Hill Sept. 

Temptation's Workshop Helen Foster-Tyrell Davis June 

Trapped in TIa Juana Edwina Booth-Duncan Renaldo. . Aug. 

Widow In Scarlet 0. Revier- Kenneth Harlan July 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

July 15 

1 67 

II 66 Aug. 27 

15 64.... Oct 29 

1 67 OcL 29 

15 64 Aug. I 



1.... 

IS. . 


....61.. 


. .Aug. 


13 


15.... 
1 


....65.. 


..Sept. 


17 







58.... July 23 



METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 



Doug- 



Rel. Date 



Title Star • 

As You Desire Me Garbo-Von Strohelm-M 

las May 

Blondia of the Follies Marion Davies-R. Montgomery.. .Aug. 

Divorce in the Family Jackie Cooper Aug. 

(Reviewed under the title "After Divorce") 

Downstairs John Gilbert Aug. 

Faithless -.T. Bankhead-R. Montgomery Oct. 

Fast Life William Halnes-Madge Evans. ..Dec. 

Flesh Wallace Beery- Karen Morley- 

Rlcardo Cortez Dee. 

Grand Hotel Garbo-John Barrymore Sent. 

Huddle > Ramon Navarro-M. Evans May 

Kongo Walter Huston-Lupe Velez Oct. 

Letty Lynton Joan Crawford-R. Montgomery. .. May 

Mask of Fu Manchu. Ths.... Boris Karloff Nov. 

New Morals for Old Robert Young-M. Perry June 

Night Court W. Huston-P. Holmes-A. Page. .June 

Pack Up Your Troubles Laurel & Hardy Sept. 

Payment Deferred M. O'Sullivan-C. Laughton Oct. 

Prosperity Dressler-Moran Nov. 

Red Dust Clark Gable-Jean Harlow Oct. 

Red Headed Woman Jean Harlow-Chester Morris June 

Skyscraper Souls W. Willlam-M. O'Sullivan July 

Smilin' Thru Norma Shearer- Fredric March- 
Leslie Howard Sept. 24 

Son Daughter Helen Hayes-Ramon Novarro Dec. 

Speak Easily Buster Keaton Aug. 

Strange Interlude Norma Shearer-Clarke Gable Dec. 

Unashamed Helen Twelvetrees July 

Washington Masquerade Lionel Barrymore July 

(Reviewed under th» title "Washington Show") 



Running Time 

Minutes Reviewed 



28. 
20. 
27. 

6. 
15. 
16. 

9. 
II. 
14. 
I. 
7. 
5. 
4. 
4. 
17. 
8. 
18. 
22. 
25. 
16. 



23. 
13. 
30. 
2. 
9. 



..71. 
..90.. 
..78., 

..72. 
..74. 
..75. 

..75. 
.115. 
.104. 
..86. 
..86. 
..67. 
..76. 
..95. 
..64. 
..76. 
..76. 
..73. 
..75., 
..80. 

.100. 



.June II 
.Sept. 10 
.Aug. 20 



.Aug. 

.Oct 
. Dec. 



.Dec. 17 

.Apr. 16 

.June 25 

.Nov. 26 

.May 7 

.Dec. ID 



.July 

.June 4 

.July 9 

.Sept. 24 

.Nov. 12 

.Oct. 22 

.June 25 
.July 



6 



.Oct 22 



..82. 
.112. 
..77. 
..74. 



.Aug. 27 

.Sept. 3 

.July 23 

.July 2 



Coming Feature Attractions 



Buddies Buster Keaton-JImmy Durante 

China Seas Clark Gable 

Clear All Wires 

Happily Unmarried 

La Tendresse Norma Shearer 

Lady, The Irene Dunne-Phillips Holmes 

Lost Joan Crawford 

Man of the Nile Ramon Novarro 

Men Must Fight Phillips Holmes-Ruth Selwyn 

Peg 0' My Heart Marlon Davles 

Pig Boats Robt. Montgomery-Jimmy Du- 
rante- Robt. Young- Walter 
Huston-Madge Evans 

Rasputin and the Empress Ethel. John and Lionel Barry- 
more Doc. 2S. 

Reunion In Vienna John and Lionel Barrymore 

Tarzan and His Mate J. Welssmuller-M. O'Sullivan 

Tugboat Annie Marie Dressier-Wallace Beery 

Turn To the Right 

Whistling in the Dark Ernest Truex-Una Merkel 

White Sister. The Helen Hayes 



MONOGRAM PICTURES CORPORATION 



Features 

Title Star 

Crashin' Broadway Rex Bell 

Diamond Trail. The Rex Bell Dee. 

Fighting Champ. The Bob Steele Dee. 

Flames Johnny Mack Brown May 

From Broadway ta CheyanM. . . Rex Bell Sept. 

Girl from Calgary FIfl D'Orsay Sent. 

Guilty or Not Guilty Betty Compson-Tom Douglas Nov. 

Hidden Valley Bob Steele Oct 

Honor of the Mounted Tom Tyler June 

Klondike Thelma Todd-Frank Hawks Aug. 

Lucky Larrlgan Rex Bell-Helen Fetter Dee. 

Man from Arizona. Tha Rex Bell Oet. 

SMf-Defensa Pauline Frederleli Dec. 

Strange Adventure Regis Toomey-Jun* Clyde Nev. 

Thirteenth Guest Ginger Rogers Sent. 

Western Limited, The Estelle Taylor Aug. 

Young Blood Bob Steele Nov. 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Dee. 30 

30 

15 

30 70 June 18 

10 

24 

15 7 reels 

10 6 reels 

20 60 

30 68.... Sept. 24 

I 

21 6 reels 

(5 88 Dec. 10 

20 7 reels 

3 68. ...Aug. 13 

5 

5 



Coming Features 



Blael( Beauty Jan. I5,'33. 

JungI* Bride Anita Paoe-Charles Starrett Jan. I0,'33. 

Oliver Twiet 

West at Singapore... Betty Compson-CIyde Cook Jan. 3I,'33. 



PARAMOUNT PUBLIX 

Features 

Title Star Rel. 

Aren't We All? GertrLde Lawrence July 

Big Broadcast. The Stuart Erwin-Bing Crosby-Kate 

Smith - Leiia Hyam - Mills 
Bros. - Boswell Sisters - Cab 
Calloway - Vincent Lopez - 
Arthur Tracv - Sharon Lynn Oct. 

Blonde Venus Marlene Dietrich .. .Sept. 

Devil and the Deep T. Bankhead-G. Cooper Aug. 

Devil Is Driving, The Edmund Loew-Wynne Gibson Dec. 

Evenings for Sale Herb Marshall-Sari Maritza Nov. 

Farewell to Arms, A Helen Hayes-Gary Cooper Dec. 

Guilty as Hell Edmund Lowe- Victor McLagien. . Aug. 

He Learned About Women Stuart Erwin-A. Skipworth Nov. 

Heritage of the Desert Randolph Scott-S. Fleming Sept. 

Horse Feathers Four Marx Bros Aug. 

Hot Saturday Nancy Carroll-Cary Grant Oct. 

If I Had a Million Gary Cooper - Wynne Gibson - 

Geo. Raft- Richard Bennett- 
Mary Robson Nov. 

Lady and Gent Geo. Bancroft- Wynne Gibson July 

Lily Christine Corinne Grifflth-Colin Cllva July 

Love Me Tonight Maurice Chevalier-Jeanette 

MacDonald Aug. 

Madame Butterfly Sylvia Sidney-Cary Grant Dec. 

Madame Racketeer Alison Skipworth-R. Bennett July 

Madison Square Garden Jack Oakie-Marian Nixon ;.Oct. 

Make Me a Star Joan Blondell-Stuart Erwin July 

Man from Yesterday C. Colbert-C. Brook June 

Merrily We Go to Hell S. Sidney-Fredric March June 

Million Dollar Legs Jack Oakie July 

Movie Crazy Harold Lloyd-C. Cummings Sept. 

Night After Night Geo. Raft-C. Cummings Oct. 

Night of June 13 Clive Brook-Frances Dee-Gene 

Raymond Sept. 

No Man of Her Own Clark Gable-Carole Lombard Dec. 

Phantom President, The Geo. M. Cohan-Claudete Col- 
bert-Jimmy Durante Oct. 

70.000 Witnesses Phil Holmes-Dorothy Jordan Sept. 

Sign of the Cross Fredric March-EIissa Landi- 

' Claudette Colbert 

Thunder Below T. Bankhead - C. Bickford - P. 

Lukas June 

Trouble in Paradise Miriam Hopkins-H. Marshall- 
Kay Francis Oct. 

Under Cover Man Geo. Raft- Nancy Carroll Dec. 

Vanishing Frontier John Mack Brown-Evalyn 

Knaop-Zasu Pitts July 

Wild Horse Mesa Randolph Scott-Sally Biane Nov. 



Running Time 
Date Minutes Reviewed 






68. . 


..July 


S 


£.0 .... 


. . . .OU . . 


. . UCl. 


0 


16 


* . . .00 . . 


. . oepi. 


in 
lu 


12*'* 


70 


. Aug. 


e 
B 


9 


;!;;7o;; 


. . Dec. 


10 


II 


....65.. 


..Nov. 


5 


OR 

Z.D . . . . 


.... 78 . . 


. . Dec. 


10 


5. .. . 


. . . .80. . 


. .July 


30 










oU. . . . 


. . . .59 . . 






19.... 


....68.. 


. .Aug. 


'6 


28.... 


....73.. 


..Oct. 


22 




....95.. 


..Nov. 


12 


is!!;; 


....80.. 


..July 


8 














. .Aug. 


20 


30 








22 


....72.. 


..July 


30 


7.... 


....74.. 


..Oct. 


8 




....68.. 


. . June 


18 


25;;;; 


....70.. 


. .June 


25 


10.... 


....78.. 


. .June 


18 


8.... 


....64.. 


..July 


2 


23 


....96.. 


..Sent 


24 


14.... 


....70.. 


..Oct. 


8 


23.... 


....72.. 


. .Sept. 


17 








24 


7.... 


....78.. 


..Sept. 


24 


2.... 


....72.. 


..Aug. 


20 






. . Dec. 


10 


17, . 


69.. 


..June 


25 


21... 


....73.. 


..Oct. 


29 


2... 


....74.. 


..Dee. 


10 


29 


70.. 


..July 


23 



25. 



Coming Features 



Carole Lombard- Robt. Armstrong. .Jan. 6,'33. 
.Stuart Erwin- Wynnt Gibson 



Billion Dollar Scandal. .. 
Crime of the Century, The. 

Curse of Sunken Gold 

Eagle and the Hawk, The Gary Cooper-Oakie-Raft 

Eleven Lives Frances Dee- Randolph Scott 

Good Company Alison Skipworth-Roland Young 

Hello, Everybody Kate Smith 

Island of Lost Souls Chas. Laughton-Richard Arlen- 

Irving Pichel-Leiia Hyams Dee 

King of the Jungle Frances Dee-ffuster Crabbe Jan 

Lives of a Bengal Lancer, The. Fredric March-Gary Cooper- 
Richard Arlen 

Luxury Liner George Brent-Sari Maritza-Zita 

Johann-lrving Pichei 

Murder at the Zoo Charles Ruggles 

Mysterious Rider. The Kent Taylor-Lona Andri Jan. 27,'33. 

Pick Up Sylvia Sidney-George Raft 

She Done Him Wrong Mae West-Owen Moore Jan. 20,'33. 

Tonight Is Ours C. Colbert- Fredric March-Paul 

Cavanagh Jan. I3.'33. 

Way to Love, The Maurice Chevalier-Carole Lom- 
bard 

Woman Accused, The Gary Grant-Nancy Carroll-John 

Haltiday- Richard Bennett 



.70 Dec. 10 



POWERS PICTURES 



Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Carmen Marguerite Namara-Tom Burke.. .May 15 70 Jan. 1$ 

Gables Mystery. The Lester Matthews-Anne Gray June 15 71. ...May 7 

Her Radio Romeo Gene Gerrard-Jessle Matthews.. .July IS 

Her Strange Desire Laurence Olivier July 1 60.... Aug. 13 

Limping Man, The Franklin Dyall Aug. 1 55 Aug. 27 

Lucky Girl Gene Gerrard-Moliy Lament Sept. 1 69 

Man Who Won. The Henry Kendall-Heather Angel Sept. IS 70 

Skin Game Edmund Gwenn - Phyllis Kon- 

stam June 1 70 

Woman Decides. The Adrianne Alien-Owen Nares Aug. IS 68 



RKO RADIO PICTURES 



Features 



Rel. Date 



Title Star 
Age of Consent. The Richard Cromwell-Eric Linden 

Arline Judge Aug. 5. 

Animal Kingdom Leslie Howard-Ann Harding Dec. 23. 

Bill of Divorcement John Barrymore-Bllile Burk*....8«pt. 30. 

Bird of Paradise D. Dei RIo-Jeei McCrea Aug. 12. 

Bring 'Em Back Ailv* Frank Buck's Adventure Aug. 19. 

Come on Danger Tom Keene Sept. 23. 

Conquerors. The Ann Harding-Richard DIx Nov. 18. 

Half-Naked Truth. The Lee Tracy-Luno Veiez Dec. 16. 

Hell's Highway Richard DIx Sept 23. 

Hold 'Em Jail Edna May Oliver • Wheeler • 

Wooisey- Roseoe Ate> Sept. 2. 

It My Face Redf Helen Twelvetrees- Rieardo Cor- 

tez-Robt. Armstrong Juno 17. 

Little Orphan Annie Mitzi Green-Buster Phelpi Nov. 4. 

Men Are Such Fooit Leo Carrillo-V. OtbofBO Nov. 18. 

Men of America Bill Boyd Dec. 9 

Monkey's Paw. The Ivan Simnson-Lsuise Carter Jan. 13, 

Most Dangerous Game. Tha Leslie Banks-Joet MeCrea Sent. 9. 

Penguin Pool Murdir Edna May Olivef Dec. 30. 

Phantom of Crestwood Rieardo Cortez-Karen Moriey Oct. 14. 

Renegades of the West Tom Keene Nev. 25. 

Roar of the Dragon Richard DIx-Gwiil Andre July 8. 

Rockabye Constance Bennett-Joei MeCrea.. . Nov. 25. 

Secrets of the French Police. .Gwili Andre-Frank Mergu Dee. 2. 

Sport Parade. Tho Joel McCrea-Marian Marsh Nov. II. 

Strange Justice Marian Marth-R. Denny Oct. 7. 

Thirteen Women Irene Dunne-Gregory Ratoff Sept. 16. 



Running Time 

Minutei Reviewed 

BO.... July 30 

78... Dot. 10 

78.... Sent 10 

...80.... June 2i 

...70.... Juno 4 

;.'.86.*.'.'.Nov."i9 



80.... Aug. 20 

74.... Juno 25 

66. ...Juno II 

70.... Oet 2S 



33. 



.75. 
..52.. 



.Nev. 
.Oct. 



...78.... July 
...75.... Nov, 



12 
I 



. 2 
Oet 22 



77. 

75.... Nov. 26 

7I....July 9 

75.... Nov. 28 

58 Dec. 17 

65.... Dee. 24 

74.... Aug. 27 

73.... Sent 8 



Coming Feature Attractions 

Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date MInutot Reviewed 

Cheyenne Kid Tom Keene Jan. 20,'33 

Geldle Gets Along Lill Damlta-Chas. Morton Jan. 27,'33 

Great Jasper, The Richard Dix-Jullo Hayden 



86 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, I 932 



(THE RELEASE CHACT—CCNT'D ) 



Runnlna Tim* 

TitI* Star R«l. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Hell Bent for Election.... Edna May Oliver 

Kina Kmb Fay Wray-Bruce Cab»t 

Little Women Anita Louise- Dorotiiy Wilun 

Lucky Devils Bill Boyd-Bruce Cabot-Wllliam 

Gargan-D. Wilson- R. Hudson 

No Other Woman Irene Dunne-Chas. Bickford Jan. 6,'33 

Our Betters .Constance Bennett-Joel McCrea 

Past cf Mary Holmes. The Helen MacKellar-Erio Linden. .. .Jan. 20,'33 

Sailer Be Good Jack Oakie-Vivienne Osborne 

Starlet River Tom Keene-D. Wllsen.... 

Sun Also Rises. The 

Sweepines ....Lionel Barrymsre .. 

Theft of the Mena Lisa. The.. Willy Forst-Trude von Moio 92 Apr. 9 

(Reviewed — German version) 

Three Game Unarmed Joel McCrea-K. Hepburn 

Topaze John Barrymore-Myrna Loy 



STATE RIGHTS 



Features 

TIM* 

A N«us La Llberte....... 

B«l, Le ... ......... 

Barberina, Th« ICIns'i 

Dancer 

Beautiful Maneuver Time 
Blame the Woman ... 

Camradeshlo 

Cruiser Emden .......... 



Runnins Time 

Star DIst'r Rel. Date Minutes (Reviewed 

Rolla France Harold Auten. ............... .93. .. .June 25 

Andre Lefaur Protex Trading SO. ...Oct. 8 



Dangers ef the Arctic... 

David Golder 

Diary «f a Revelutienist. . 
Face on the Barroom Floor, 

The 

Fire in the Opera... 

Flower Lady ef LIndenau. 
Forbidden Company ...... 

GItta Discovers Her Heart. 

Gloria 

Herzblut 

House of Death 

I Kits Your Hand, Madame, 
Immwtal Vaaabend. The., 
In the Days *f the Crusaders, 

Isle of Paradise 

Louisa, Queen ef Prussia... 

Love Is Love 

Maedchen in Uniform 

Manhattan Tcwer 

Man Without a Name, The. 
Midnight Lady. The,,,.... 

1914 

Out of Singapere 

Pride of the Leilen ....... 

Red Haired Alibi......... 

Schubert's Dream «f Sprins. 
Silver Lining. The........ 

Slightly Marrlad 



Lii Dagsver ....... .Capital Oct. 25 

Ida Wuest World's Trade . ........ 

Adolphe Menlou- 

Benita Huvo ....Principal ..... 

.Assoc. Cinemas.. 

World's Trade 

Exchange . . . 

. ......Exp. Film Co.., 

Harry Baur .. ..Protex Trading , ..... 

G. V. Mouzalevsky. . Amkino ...June 

B. Fletcher ..Invincible 

G. Froelich - J. 

Nowatna Capital .. ..July 

Renate Mueller ....Protex Tradlm. . July 

Sally Blane ..Chesterfield June 

Gitta Alpar Capital ............. 

Gustav Froehlich ...Tobis .Oct. 

Renate Mueller Clnes-Pittaluga.. •opt, 

N. P. Chmeiioff... ..Amkino Aug. 

Mariene Dietrich ...Stanley .... Aug. 

Gustav Froelich Ufa 

Alberto Pasguall ....Monopole Oct. 

.....invincible 

Henny Porten ......Assoc. Cinemas. . Oct. 

Kathe von Nagy Ufa 

Hertha Thiele 



.87. 



.Nov. 12 



. Oct. IS. 
..Nov. S. 

. Seot e. 



12. 
7. 

I. 

27! 
30. 
12. 
27. 



.,74. 
..78. 

..8S. 
..58. 
. .80. 
.100. 

..66. 

..92.. 
..70.. 
..67. 
..91. 
..87.. 
.,77. 
..76.. 
..60.. 
..88.. 
..75. 



..Nov. 
. . Dec. 



..Oct. I 

..July 9 

..Oct. 29 

..June 18 

. . Oct. 22 
6 



.92. 



. Ramlngton ..... Bee. 
.Protex Tradlms.Nov. 



Sniper, The ... 
Speed Madness 



Thrill ®f Yeuth 

Two Hearts That Beat 

as One 

Virgins of Bali 

With Williamson Beneath 

the Sea 

Woman In Chains 

(Reviewed under 
Yorck ., 

TIFFANY 

Features 



John Krtmslky- 
Gifford Cochran. 

Mary Brian-Irene 

Rich- James Hall. 
Werner Krauss..,, 

John Darrow Chesterfield 

.Capital Sept 

Noah Beery Goldsmith Pics. 

Sally Blane-B. Kent. Mascot ..Oct. 

Merna Kennedy ....Capital ........Oct. 

Alfred Laeutner Capital 

Maureen O'Sulilvan. . Patrician Pic- 
tures 

Evalyn Knapp-Walter 

Byron Chesterflel d Oct. 

.Amkino Aug. 

Richard Talmadge- 

Nancy Drexei ....Mercury 

June Clyde Chesterfleld ....Aug. 



.110.... Oct. 



.Aug. 
. .Aug. 

..July 9 

..Oct. 15 

.Nov. 12 

..Oct. 15 

.Aug. 27 

.Sept. 10 

.June 4 

..Oct. 15 

..July 16 

..Oct. IS 

..June il 

I 



..67. 
.90.. 

..65. 
.73., 
.61. 

..70. 

..75. 

..75. 



15. 



.58. 



.65. 
.68. 



..62. 
.63. 



.Nov. 19 

.Dee. 17 

.June II 

I Sept. 24 

.Sept. 24 

.Oct. 29 

.Oct. 29 

.July 2 

.June 4 

.Dec. 3 

.Sept. 3 

.July 30 

.Sept. 10 



Lilian Harvey 



.Ufa-Protex Sept. 8 80 Sept. 24 

.Principal Dec. 8 46 Dec. 17 

Principal Nov. 24. .....59 Dec. 3 

Owen Nares Invincible 69 Aug. 13 

title "The Impassive Footman" — Assoc. Radio British) 

Werner Krauss Protex Trading Nov. 28. .....99 Dee. It 



Title 

Last Mile. The 

Man Called Back. The 
Those We Love 



Running Time 

Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Preston Foster - Howard 

Phillips .....Aug. 21.. 84. ...July 30 

Conrad Nagel-Doris Kenyon July 17 80 July 23 

Liivan Tashman- Kenneth 

MacKenna .Sept. 11 77 Sent. 17 



UNITED ARTISTS 



Features 



Title 
Congress Dances 



Running Tl 

Star Rel. Date Minutes 
..Lilian Harvey ..83 



Cynara ....Ronald Colman-Kay Francis Dec. 

Kid from Spain. The. ........ Eddie Cantor ...Nov. 

Magic Night ...Jack Buchanan Nov. 

Mr. Robinson Crusoe Douglas Fairbanks Aug. 

Rain ....Joan Crawford .Oct. 

White Zombie Bela Luoosi .Aug. 

Coming Feature Attractions 

Halleluiah. I'm a Bum Ai Jolson : 

I Cover the Waterfront 

Jade ....(Made in Tibet and India) 

Joe Palooka ...Jimmv Durante 

Masouerader, The Ronald Colman-Elissa Landi 

Perfect Understanding ....... .Gloria Swanson 

Secrets Mary Pickford-Lesllo Howard 



24. 
17... 
5... 
19... 
22... 
4... 



.80 
...90.. 
. ..76.. 
. ..72.. 
, ..85.. 
. ..70.. 



me 

Reviewed 
..May 28 
;.Nav. 5 
. . Nov. 5 
..Nov, 
, . Oct. 
. .Sent 
. .Aug, 



12 



17 
6 



UNIVERSAL 

Features 



Title Star 
Afraid to Talk Eric Linden-Sidney Fex Nov. 

(Reviewed under title "Merry Go Round"> 

Air Mall , .....Pat O'Brien-Ralph Bellamy Nov. 

All American. The ...Richard Arlen-Gloria Stuart..... Oct. 

Back Street Irene Dunne-John Boles .«.Sept. 

Doomed Battalion. The Tala BIrell-Vlctor Varcon! June 

Fast Companions .Tom Brown June 

Flaming Guns .Tom Mix-Ruth Hall Dec. 

Fourth Horseman, The Tom Mix , Sept. 

Hidden Geld Tom Mix Nov. 

laloo All Star July 

My Pal, The King ..Tom Mix Aug. 

Okay America Lew Ayres-Maureen O'Sulil- 
van Sept. 



Running Tl 
Rel. Date Minutes 



17 



S.. 
13,. 

1.. 
16.. 
23.. 

22. 
29.. 

3.. 
14.. 

4.. 



.76. 

. ..83.. 
. ..78.. 
. ..84.. 
. . .82. . 
...78 . 



me 

Reviewed 

..Sept. 24 

..Oct. 8 

..Sent. 24 

..July 23 
. .June 



IS 



..58. 
..75. 



...July 
. . . July 



Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Old Dark House. The Boris Karloff-L. Bond Oet. 20 74 July It 

Once In a Lifetime Jack Oakle-Sidney Fox Sept. 22 75 Aug. 27 

Texas Bad Man Tom Mix June 30 60 

Tom Brown of Culver Tom Brown July 21 70 July 16 



Coming Features 



Big Cage. The Clyde Beatty 

Counsel lor-at- Law 

Destination Unknown Pat. O'Brien-Ralph Bellamy. .. .Jan. 26,'33 

Laughing Boy Zita Johann 

Laughter In Hell Pat O'Brien-Gloria Stuart Jan. I2,'33 

Loft Bank. The 

Mummy, The Boris Karloff-Zlta Johann Dec. 22 78 Dec. 3 

Nagana Tala Birell-Melvyn Douglas Jan. I9.'33 

Prison Doctor, The 

Private Jones Lee Tracy-Gloria Stuart Feb. 9,'33 

Rebel, The Vilma Banky-Luis Trenker 

Road Back, The 

Rustler's Roundup Tom Mix-Diane Sinclair 

S. 0. S. Iceberg 

Salt Air Chas. Murray-Geo. Sidney 

Terror Trail, The Tom Mix ....Feb, 2,'33 

They Just Had to Get Marrled.Summervllle-Pltts ............ ..Jan. S.'33. 



WARNER BROS. 

Features 



Title star 

Big City Bluee .....Joan Blendell 

Big Stampede, The John Wayne Oct. 

Blessed Event Lee Tracy-Mary Brian ......Sept. 

Haunted Gold ......John Wayne Dec. 

1 Am A Fugitive from a Chall 

Gang .......Paul Muni .Nov. 

Jewel Robbery Wm. Pewell-Kay Franils.. Aug. 

One Way Passage Wm. Powell-Kay Francis Oet. 

Ride Him Cowboy ....John Wayne-Ruth Hall Aug. 

Scarlet Dawn D, Fairbanks. Jr. - Nancy 

Carroll Ntv. 

Successful Calamity. A ..George Arliss Sept. 

Two Against the World Constance Bennett Sept. 

Winner Take All James Cagney July 



Running Time 
Rel. Data Minutes Reviewed 

Sept. 18 68. ...June It 

8 

10... 84....8egt I* 

17 



22.. 
27.. 

12.. 
17.. 
3,. 
II.. 



68.. 
«9.. 
SI . 

58.. 

72.. 

71.. 

67 



.Oet. Z2 
.June II 
.July SO 



..Nov. 12 

..Oct. 1 

..July SO 

..June 25 



Coming Feature Attractions 



Baby Face Barbara Stanwyck 

Blue Moon Murder Case, The.. Ben Lyon - Mary Brian - Peggy 

Shannon 

Forty-Second Street ....Warner Baxter-Bebe Daniels- 

Geo. Brent 

Grand Slam .Paul Lukas-Loretta Young.. 

Hard to Handle James Cagney Jan. 28,'33 

Illegal ..Ivor Barnard 

Keyhole. The Kay Francis-George Brent 

King's Vacation, The George Arliss 

Ladies They Talk About Barbara Stanwyck Feb. 4.'33 

Lawyer Man .....Wm. Powell-Joan Blendell Jan. 7.'33 72 Dec. 3 

Parachute Jumper Douglas Fairbanks, Jr Jan. 28.'33 

Picture Snatcher James Cagney 

Somewhere in Sonera ..,,,John Wayne 

Sucker ....D. Fairbanks. Jr.-Loretta Young 

Telegraph Trail. The ....John Wayne 

Wax Museum ....Lionel Atwill-Fay Wray 



WORLD WIDE 



Features 

Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Bachelor's Folly ...Herbert Marshall-Edna Best June 12 69 July 2 

Between Fighting Men Ken Maynard Oct. 

Breach of Promise Chester Morris-Mae Clarke Oct. 



16. 
23. 



25 75.... Dec. 24 

31 59 



..62 

..67 

Come On, Tarzan ,Ken Maynard Sept. II 61 

Crooked Circle, The .Ben Lyon-lrene Purcell Sept. 25 70 Aug. 2( 

Death Kiss. The Adrlenne Ames-David Manners- 
John Wray .Dee. 

Dynamite Ranch Ken Maynard ..July 

False Faces .....Lowell Sherman-Lila Lee ..Oct. 

Fargo Express ..Ken Maynard ■ Nov. 20 

Hyonotized Moran and Mack Dec. 25. 

Man from Hell's Edges. The,. Bob Steele June 

Racetrack .Leo Carrillo June 

Sign of Four. The Arthur Wontner Aug. 

Son of Oklahoma ...Bob Steele ..July 

Texas Buddies .Bob Steele Aug. 28 

Trailing the Killer (Special) .Doc. 4, 



13.. 



83 Dec. 

.62 



....70. ...Dec. 24 
a .61 June 4 



5. 

14.. 
17.. 



Uptown New York ...........Jack Oakie-Shirley Grey ..Dee. 

Coming Features 



4 



.78 

..74. ...July 30 

..55 

..59 

..68 Oct. 15 



. ..Nev. 19 



29,'33. 



Drum Taps Ken Maynard Jan. 

Job Gregory Ratoff 

Lone Avenger. The .Ken Maynard Apr, 9.'33 

Phantom Thunderbolt Ken Maynard Mar, 5, 33 

Tarnished Youth Jetta Goudal-Gllbert Roland.... 

Tombstone Canyon Ken Maynard Dec. 25 62. 



OTHER PRODUCT 



.78 Aug. 20 



Features 

Running Time 

Title Star Dlsfr Rel. Data Minutes Reviewed 

Baroud Rex Ingram ... Gaumont-Brltlsh , 67 Oet. 15 

Diamond Cut Diamond Adolphe Menlou , . . M G M-Brltisli 71 Sept. 10 

Faithful Heart. The Herbert Marshall- Gainsborough- 
Edna Best Gaumont May 28 

Fires of Fate Lester Matthews ...British Int'l.. 72 Oct. 

Flying Souad, The Harold Huth , British Lion 79 Aug. 

Green Snot Mystery. The.. Jack Lloyd Mutual. London 66 Sept. 

Here's George George Clarke P.D.C.-Brltlsh 64 Nov. 

Jack's the Boy ...Jack Hulbert Gaumont-Galns- 

borough Aug. IS. . . .61. .. .Sept. 24 

Josser on the River. ...... Ernest Letlnia .....British Int'n'l 71 Sept. 17 

Leap Year ..Tom Walls-Anne British and Do- 
Grey minions 89 Dec. 

Lodger. The Ivor Novell* ......Twickenham 84 Oct. 

Looking en the Bright Side. Grade Fields Assoc. Radio- 
British 82 Oet. 

Love Contract. The Owen Nares British and De- 
minions 82 Aug. 

Love on Wheels... Jack Hulbert Gaumont-Galnt- 

borough 87.,,. Aug. 

Mayor's Nest ...Svdnev Howard British and Do- 
minions 73 July 16 

Night Like This. A Ralph Lynn British and Do- 

mlnlsns 73 May 21 

Nine Till Six Louise Hampton ...Asso. Radle- 

Brltlsh 78.... May 21 

Sally BIshsn Harold Huth-Jean ..... „ 

Barry .British Lion 82.... Dee. 10 

Thark Tom Walls- Ralph British and De- 
Lynn minions ...-77 Aug. 27 

Wedding Rehearsal Roland Young London Film 

White Face John H. Roberts Gainsborough- 
British 71 June II 



15 
6 
3 
5 



17 
IS 



IS 
27 



13 



December 3 1, I 932 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



87 



(THE RELEASE CHART— CONT'D » 



SliCI^T FILMS 

[All dates are 1932 unless otherwise 
stated] 



COLUMBIA 



Running Time 
Rel. Date IHinutes Reviewed 



Title 
CURIOSITIES 

C 233 Apr. 21 I reel 

C 234 May 9 I reel 

C 235 June 7 I reel 

C 236 July 26 I reel 

C 237 Sent. 1 10 Sent. 24 

EDDIE BUZZELL 

SPECIALTIES . „. . , 

Welf In Cheap Clothlna... .Apr. 21 I reel 



.Sept. 24 



KRAZY KAT KART00N8 

Crystal Gazabo Nov. 7 

HIe-Cups, the Champ May 28 7... 

LIghtheuie Keeping Aua. 15 

MInetrel Show. Tht Nov. 21 

Paperhanger June 21 

Prosperity Blues 

Ritzy Hotel May 9 

Seeing Stars Nov. 30 8 Dec. 17 

Snow Man 

Wedding Bolls 

LAMBS GAMBOLS 

Ladies Not Allowed Sept. 8 

Shave It With Music Sept. 30 

Lambs All-Star Gambol Dec. 20 



MEDBURY SERIES 
Laughing with Medbury 

in Wildwest ..Aug. II I reel 

Laughing with Medbury 

In Mandalay May 31 I reel 

Laughing with Medbury 

In India I reel 

Laughing with Medbury 

In Philippines Nov. II 1 reel 

Laughing with Medbury 

Among the Wide Open 

Faces • • Oct. 11 I reel 

Laughing with IHedbury 

Among Dancing Nations I reel 

Laughing with IHedbury 

In Wonders of the World I reel 



7 May 21 



MICKEY MOUSE 

Barnyard Olympics Apr. IS.. 

Mickey in Arabia July 20 7 Dec. 10 

Mickey's Revue May 27 

Musical Farmer July II 

SCRAPPY CARTOONS 

Bad Genius. The 

Battle of the Barn May 31 

Camping Out Aug. 10 

Fair Play July 2 

False Alarm 

Famous BJrd Case, The 

Fencing Around 

Flop Heus* ...Nov. 9 

Pet Shop. The Apr. 28 

Stepping Stones May 17 

Wolf at the Door, The 



SILLY SYMPHONIES 
China Plate 7. 



.Dec. 



SUNRISE COMEDIES 

His Vacation Sent. 

Mind Doesn't Matter 



EDUCATIONAL 



Title 

ANDY CLYDE COMEDIES 

A Fool About Women Nov, 

Boudoir Butler, The May 29 

Boy, Oh Boyl Dec. 25 

For the Love of Ludwig July 24 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



27 22 

22 
21 



Sunklssed Sweeties Oct. 30. 

The Genius 



22 







. . Nov. 


12 




. .June 


4 




..July 


23 



BABY BURLESKS 

Glad Rags to Riches 10 Oct. I 

Kid' In' Hollywood 

Kid's Last Fight. The 9 Dec. 3 

Pie-Covered Wagon Oct. 30 10 Aug. 6 

War Babies Sept. 18 ID Aug. 6 

BATTLE FOR LIFE 

Battle of the Centuries Oct. 2 9 

Desert Demons 

Killers Oct. 30 10 



BRAY'S NATURGRAPHS 

An Oregon Camera Hunt Sept. II 9 

Our Bird Citizens Oct. 9 8 Dec. 10 

Our Noble Ancestors Dec. 4 9 

Wild Company Jan. I, '33 

BROADWAY GOSSIP 

No. I Sept. 25 II 

No. 2 Dee. II I reel 

CAMERA ADVENTURES 

The Forgotten Island Sept 4 10 

The Iceless Arctic Nov. 6 II 



CANNIBALS OF THE DEEP 

Freaks of the Deep May 29 7 .. 

Man Eating Sharks Apr. 10 V/t. 

Sea Going Birds July 3 7 .. 

DO YOU REMEMBER 

Gaslit Nineties. The Nov. 27 8 .. 

Old New York Sept. II 10 .. 

When Dad Was a Bey Jan. 22,'33 



..June II 



GLEASON'S SPORT 

FEATURETTES 

A Hockey Hick Dec. II 19. 

Always Kickin' Oct. 9 20 

Off His Base Sept. 18 20 

GREAT HOKUM MYSTERY 

Burned at the Steak Oct. 

Evil Eye C(B«u«rt, Ik* Jan. 

Hypnetizlnt for Lev* Aug. 

Iq the Clutches of Death Nov. 



16 18 

8 '33 

21*. . . le.'.'.'. '.sipt ' i7 

13 14 



Title 
HODGE-PODGE 

Bubble Blowers Sept. II. 

Fury of the Storm July 3. 

Little Thrills Oct. 23. 

Prowlers, The May I . 

Women's Work Sept. 25. 

Wonder City, The.... 

IDEAL COMEDIES 
(Breoks-Flynn) 
Hollywood Lights 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



.Nov. 20 9. 



,10 

. 9 July 30 

. 9 

. 9 May 7 

9 



.May 8. 



MACK SENNETT 
COMEDIES 
Alaska Love July 

Andy CIdye 
Candid Camera, The Juno 

Granger-Pangborn 
Divorce A La Mode May 

Raymond Hatten 
Listening In Apr. 

Arthur Stone- D. Granger 
Neighbor Trouble Aug. 

Stone-Granger 

Young Onions Sept. 

Harvey-Granger 

MACK SENNETT 
FEATURETTES 

Hatta Marri July 

Harry Gribbon 

Spot on the Rug, The May 

Billy Bevan 



14.. 
18.. 



10.. 



IS. 



.20. 

.20. 
. 19. 
.22. 
. 19. 
. 19. 
.19.. 

.20., 
. 19. 



.Apr. 30 



.Aug. 13 
May 21 



Sept. 10 



..July 2 
..May 21 



.Nov. 



6 22 Oct. 



MERMAID COMEDIES 
Big Flash. The 

Harry Langdon 
Hitch Hiker. The 

Harry Langdon 
Pest, The 

Harry Langdon 
Tired Feet Jan. I.'33 

Harry Langdon 
Vest with a Tale, The Dec. 4 22. 

Tom Howard 



OPERALOGUES 

Brahmin's Daughter, A Jan. 

Idol of Seville Aug. 

Milady's Escapade May 

Walpurgis Night OeL 



8,'33 

28 21 July 

15 21 Apr. 

30 20 



30 
30 



SPIRIT OF THE CAMPUS 

Cornell Dec. 18 9. 

Michigan Dee. 4 8. 

Yale ..■ Oct. 9 10. 



.Dee, 17 



10.. 
16.. 



... 6.... 
6. 



.July 



6 June 18 



.Dec. 



TERRY-TOONS 

Burlesaue Sept. 4 6 

Bluebeard's Brother May 29 • July 

Cocky Cock Roach July 

College Spirit Oct 

Farmer Al Falfa's Ape 

Girl Aug. 

Farmer Al Falfa's Bedtime 

Story June 

Farmer Al Falfa's Birthday 

Party Oct. 

Forty Thieves, The Nov. 

Hollywood Diet Dec. 

Hook and Ladder No. I Oct. 

Ireland or Bust Dec. 

Jealous Lover Jan. 

Mad King, The Juno 

Robin Hood Jan. 

Romance May 

Sherman Was Right Aug. 21 

Southern Rhythm Sept. 18. 

Spring Is Here July 24. 

Toyland .Nov. 27.. 

Woodland May 



9 
16 



6... 
6... 
6... 
7... 
6... 



.Nov. 



2.... 

13 

II.... 
30.... 
25.... 
8,'33. 
26.... 

22.'33 

IS 6 May 

6 

6 

6 Aug. 

6 Dee. 

6 



6. 



.July 



23 
28 



I. 

TOM HOWARD COMEDIES 

A Drug on the Market Jan. 22,'33 

The Acid Test Nov. 27 II. 

The Mouse Trapper Sept. II 12. 



TORCHY COMEDIES 
( Ray Cooke) 

Torchy's Busy Day Oct. 2 20 

Torchy's Kitty Coup Jan. 22,'33...20 

Terchy Rolls His Own Nov. 20 21.... 

Torchy's Two Toots June 5 20.... 



.May 14 



VANITY COMEDIES 



He's a Honey Apr. 

Harry Barris 
Hollywood Run-Around Dec. 

Monty Collins 
Honeymoon Beach Oct. 

Billy Bevan-Glenn Tryon 
Keyhole Katie Jan. I5,'33 

Gale Seabrook-John T. 
Murray 

Now's the Time June 

Harry Barris 
Ship A-Hooey Aug. 

Olenn Tryon 



7 21.... 



.Apr. 



.20. 



18. 

.23 21... 



12. 



.20 Juno 



.22. 



FOX FILMS 



Title 

MAGIC CARPET SERIES 

28 Big Game of the Sea. ...Aug 

29 Manhattan Medley Sept 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



30 By-Ways of France Sept. II 



28 

18 



9... 
21... 
4. 



8... 
10... 
9... 
9... 
9... 
9... 



31 Zanzibar Oct 

32 Incredible India Aug, 

33 The Tom -Tom Trail Sept 

34 Over the Bounding Main 9 

35 Belles of Ball Oct 16 8 

36 Fisherman's Fortune ....Oct 2 9 , 

37 Rhineland Memories Sept 25 8 

38 Pirate Isles Nov. 27 9 

39 Sampans and Shadows 9 

40 In the Clouds...... vi-'ii .3 ' 

41 Sailing a Souare-Rlgger. .Oct 23 10 Dee, 

42 In the Guianas Dec. 25 9 

43 Venetian Holiday Oct 

44 Havana Hoi Nov, 

45 Paths In Palestine Nov. 

46 The Lure of the Orient. . .Jan. 

47 Mediterranean Memories . .Jan. 

48 The Iceberg Patrol 

49 Silver Springs Dec. II 



..Dee. 17 



30. 

6 

13 

8,' 33. 

I. '33. 



10 



10 Nov, 12 

9 

8 

9 



9 Nov. 



It 



Running Time 

Title Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

50 Broadway by Day 

51 Here Comes the Circus. . .Jan. I5,'33 

52 Desert Tripoli Dee. 18 

53 Alpine Echoes Aug. 14 

54 Ricksha Rhythm Nov. 20 

55 From Kashmir to the 
Khyber Dee. 4 

56 Sicilian Sunshine Jan. 22,'33. 

57 Boardwalks of New York 

58 When In Rome Feb. 5,'33 

59 Gorges of the Giants Jan. 29,'33. 

60 Rhapsody of the Rails 

61 Mississippi Showboats 

62 Berlin Medley 9 Nov. 2< 



METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 



BOY FRIENDS, THE 

Too Many Women May 14 19.. 

Wild Babies June 18 17.. 

You're Telling Mo Apr. 16 19.. 



CHARLEY CHASE 

First In War May 28 20 Apr. B 

Girl Grief Oct 8 

In Walked Charley Apr. 23 21 

Mr. Bride Dec. 24 

Now We'll Tell One Nov. 19 19 Oct 22 

Young Ironsides Sept. 3 



FISHERMAN'S PARADISE 

Color Scales Apr. 23... 

Trout Fishing Apr. 2... 



.. 9 May 

.. 9 



FITZPATRICK 
TRAVELTALKS 

Barbados and Trinidad Sent. 24 9 

Come Back to Erin 9 June 4 

Leningrad 9 

Over the Seas to Borneo 9 

Romantic Argentina Aug. 27 9 

World Dances. The 9 

FLIP. THE FROG 

Bully Juno 18 7 

Circus Aug. 27 

Music Lesson. The 

Office Boy. The .' July 16 

Puppy Love Apr. 30 7 

Room Runners Aug. 13 

School Days May 14 7 

LAUREL & HARDY 

Chimo, The May 21 25 ..Apr. 9 

County Hospital June 25 20 Apr. 23 

Music Box Apr. 16 29 Mar. 12 

Scram Sept. 10 21 Oct. IS 

ODDITIES 

Chill and Chills Sept 10 

Sea Spiders Aug. 13 9 Oct. 

Toy Parade, The 7 Dec. 



2i 
17 



OUR GANG 

Birthday Blues Nov. 12 

Choo Choo May 7 20. 

Free Wheeling Oct. 1 

Hook and Ladder Aug. 27 

Pooch June 4. 



...May 21 



.21 May 2S 



PITTS-TODD 

Alum and Eve Sept 24 18 Aug. IS 

Asleeo in the Feet 

Old Bull June 4 20 May 7 

Show Business Aug. 20 

Soilers, The Oct 29 

Strictly Unreliable Apr. 30 20 

SPORT CHAMPIONS 

Blocks and Tackles 

Chalk Uo Dec. 10 10 

Desert Regatta Sept. 17 10 

Flying Spikes Apr. 16 9 

Football Footwork i 

Old Spanish Custom Oct. 15 10 

Pigskin I2 Dee. 10 

Snow Birds Aug. 20 10 

Swing High Nov. 12 10 Dee. 17 

Timber Toppers May 7 9 

TAXI BOYS 

Hot Soot 18 Oct I 

Strange Innertube Sept. 22 

Thundering Taxis Sept. 17 

What Price Taxi Aug. 13 '.' " 



PARAMOUNT PUBLIX 

Running Time 

Title Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

HOLLYWOOD ON PARADE 

No. 1 Aug. 26 10 Aug. 11 

No. 2 Sept 23 I reel 

No. 3 Oct 21 I reel 

No. 4 Nov. 18 1 reel 

No. 5 Dec. 16 I reel 

No. 6 Jan. I3,'33... 1 reel 

ONE REEL ACTS 

Beyond the Blue Horizon Apr. I 

Vincent Lopez 

Breaking Even Sept. 30 

Tom Howard 

Bridge It Is May 13 

The Musketeers 
Bun Voyage June 3 

Lester Allen " " 

Coffee and Aspirin Apr. 8 

Sollv Ward 

Hawaiian Fantasy Jan. 20,'33 1 reel 

Vincent Lopez 

Hollywood Beauty Hints July 15 

Irene July 1 ' 

Ethel Merman 
Knowmore College Apr. 15 

Rudy Vallee 

Meet the Winner May 6 

Tom Howard 



88 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1, 1 932 



(THE RELEASE CH ACT—CCNT'D ) 



Title 



Runnina Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 
28 10 Oct. I 



23 I reel 



Musical Doctor Oct 

Rudy Vallee 

Patents Pending Aug. 5. 

Burns and Allen 

Pro and Con . -JuW 8. 

Tom Howard-Alan Brooks 
Rhapsody In Black & Blue... Sent. 2. 
Louis Armstrong 

Rookie. The Dec 

Tom Howard . «j t 

Seat en the Curb. A June 24 7.. 

Hugh Cameron 

Arthur Aylesworth , 

Singapore Sue Jme 10 10.. 

Anna Chang . „. 

Switzerland Aor. 29 

Lester Allen 

Ten Dollars or Ten Days ..July 22 

Eddie Younger and His 
Mountaineers „ 

Those Blues May 27 

Vincent Lopez 

Your Hat N"*- 25 

Burns & Allen 

PARAMOUNT PICTORIAL- 
NEW SERIES 
No. I— Mists of the Morn- 
ing—Temple Bells of In- 
do-China — Famous Radio 

Personalities Aug. 

No 2 — Just Mentioning the 

Unmentionable — New 

England Sunsets— Famous 

Radio Personalities Sent. 

No. 3— Making Friends In 

the Desert— The Fall of 

the Year — Radio Star- 

Maker Oct. 

No. 4— Distinctive Hair for 

Distinctive Heads — The 

Blooming Desert — The 

Camels Are Coming Nov. 

No. 5 — John Mongol Comes 

to Town — Have a Little 

Ski— Meet Your Favorite 

Radio Personalities Dec. 

No 6 — Land of Sun and 

Shine — La Rumba do 

Cuba— Big Shots of U. S. 

Naw P"- 

No. 7— Jan. 

SCREEN SONGS 



Title 

TWO REEL COMEDIES 
Blue of the Night 

Bing Crosby 
Bridge It Is 

The Musketeers 
Bring 'Em Back Sober. 

Sennett Star 



Rel. Date 



Running Time 

Minutes Reviewed 



Sept. 10 



.Aug. 13 



...Aug. 13 



12 I reel 



9...'.. I reel 



7 I reel 



4 I reel 



I reel 



30 

27. '33... 



reel 
I reel 



.Jan. I3,'33.. I reel 



17. 



I. 



22.. 
21.. 



Ain't She Sweet 

Lillian Roth 
Dinah 

MIlit Bros. 
Down Among the Sugar 

Cane Aug. 26. 

Lillian Roth 
I Ain't Got Nobody June 

Mills Bros. _ ^ 

Just a Gigolo Sent 

Irene BordonI 
Just One More Chance ...... Apr. 

Let Me Call You Sweetheart .. May 20 I reel 

Ethel Merman 
Oh, How I Hats to Get 

Ud in the Morning Apr. 

Romantic Melodies Oct. 

The Street Singer 
Rudy Vallee Melodies Aug. 5. 

Rudy Vallee _ . ,„ 

School Days Sent. 30. 

Gus Edwards 
Shine On Harvest Moon May 

Alice Joy 
Sing a Song Dec. 

James Melton 
Time On My Handi Dee. 

Ethel Merman 
When It's Sleepy Time 

Down South Nov. 

Boswell Sisters . . 

You Try Somebody Else July 29. 

Ethel Merman 

SCREEN SOUVENIRS 



.. 7 

. . 1 reel 

. . I reel 



May 



6 I reel 



23. 



II. 



reel 



.10. 



June 25 



No. 10 — Old Time Novelty. 
No. II — Old Time Novelty. 
No. 12— Old Time Novelty. 



.Apr. 22 I reel 

.May 20 I reel 

.June 17 1 reel 



SCREEN SOUVENIRS — NEW SERIES 



Aug. 


5. .. . 


1 reel 


Sept. 


2 ... 


1 reel 


SepL 


30... 


10.... 


Oct. 


28 ... . 


1 reel 


Nov. 




1 reel 


Dec. 


23.... 


1 reel 


Jan. 


20,'33. 


1 reel 



.Oct IS 



PARAMOUNT SOUND NEWS 
Two Editions Weekly 

SPORTS EYE VIEW 

Building Winners Aug. 

Catch 'Em Young Dec. 

Fighting Fins Sept. 

Over the Jumps .Jan. 

Stuff on the Ball Nov. 

Water Jamboree Nov. 

TALKARTOONS 



19 I reel 

9 I reel 

16 10 Oct. 15 

6,'33... I reel 

II I reel 

14 I reel 



reel 



Adnlulon Free June 10 

A-Hunting We Did Ge Apr. 29 

Betty Beep's Bamboo Isle.. Sept. 23 

Betty Beep's BIzzy Bee Aug. 19 I reel 

Betty Boop's Crazy Inventions . .Jan. 27,'33..l reel 

Betty Booo for President Nov. 4 7 Oct. 

Betty Boop's Ker-Cheo Jan. 

Betty Beop Limited July 

Betty Boo*. M.D Sept. 

Betty Bee*'* Museum Dee, 

Batty Beep's Ups & Downs.. Oct. 

BUB Bandit, The Apr. 

Chau Nuts May 

Danclag Feel Apr. 

Hide and Seek May 

Kidnapping (Tent.) July 

Minding the Baby Sent. 26 I reel 

Stopping the Show Aug. 12 



I 

6,'33... 7 Dee. 10 

I I reel 

2 7 Dec. 10 

16 I reel 

14 I reel 

4 I reel 

13 

8 I reel 

27 7 Aer. 16 

I I reel 



Charles Murray 



Sennett Star 



Doubling in the Quickies. 
Sennett Star 



Billy House 
False Impresslo 

Sennett Star 
Harem. Scarem 

Al St. John 



Johnny Burke 
Hollywood Double, 

Sennett Star 
Honeymoon Bridge 

Sennett Star 



Sennett Star 



Ma's Pride and 
Donald Novis 



Tom Howard 
iingino Plumbe 
Donald Novis 



Dane & Arthur 



Ford Sterling 



Tom Howard 



Sennett Star 



May 










Nov. 


18... 








Oct. 


28 


.19 


Dec. 


17 




9... 


.20 


Dec. 


3 


May 










. Dec. 


16... 


. 2 reels 








1... 


.19 


May 


7 


Nov. 


4.... 
















.July 


8 


.22 Sept. 

2 reels 


3 


Nnv 


■at 












30... 










3 










6 . 










14... 


.18 


Aug. 


27 




20 








Nov. 










Sent 












27,'33 










15... 


.20 


.May 


14 












July 


22 










24... 


.20 


.June 


18 


. Jan. 


20.'33 









POWERS PICTURES 



Dream Flowers Sept. 15 9 

Dual Control Sept 1 12 

(Capt. James A. Molli- 
sen-Amy Johnson) 

It All Depends on You. ....Nov. 1 8 

Land of Mv Fathers 9 

Land of the Shamrocks 10 Apr. 2 

LlQht of Love Oct. 15 9 

Me and the Boy Friend Oct 1 8 

Mvsterv of Marriage. The 18 Apr. 2 

Special Messengers 9 Mar. 26 



RKO-RADIO PICTURES 



Title 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



CHARLIE CHAPLIN SERIES (Re-lssues) 

The Cure Aug. 19 20 .. 

Easy Street Sent. 30 lO'/a. 

The Floorwalker Dec. 30 20'/2 

The Rink Nov. II 



.Dec. 17 



CLARK AND McCULLOUGH SERIES 

Ice Man's Ball Aug. 12 20 Aug. 13 

Jitters. The Butler Dec. 30 201/2 Aug. 20 

Millionaire Cat. The Oct. 21 21 



HARRY SWEET COMEDIES 

Firehouse Honeymoon Oct. 28 18 

Just a Pain in a Parlor.. ..Aug. 26..... 20 

HEADLINER SERIES 

Shampoo, the Magician Nov. 25 17 

Roscoe Ates-Hugh Herbert 

MASQUERS COMEDIES 

Bride's Bereavement. The... Nov. 28 20. 

Iron Minnie July 4. 

Rule 'Em and Ween May 2. 

Two Lips and Juleps Sept. 9. 



.19 May 

.20 



21 



MICKEY McGUIRE SERIES 

Mickey's Bio Business May 21 

Mickey's Busy Day Sept. 2 18. 

Mickey's Charity Dec. 2 18 

Mickey's Golden Rule June 4 19. 



.Aug.! 6 



MR. AVERAGE MAN COMEDIES 
(EDGAR KENNEDY) 

Giggle Water June 28. 

Golf Chump, The Aug. 

Mother-in-Law's Day Aor. 25 

Parlor, Bedroom and Wrath.. Oct 14 



20 May 21 

5 20 Aug. 13 

,20 

2OV1 



PATHE NEWS 

Released twice a week 
PATHE REVIEW 
Released once a month 



TOM AND JERRY SERIES 



Barnyard Bunk Sept. 16. 



.Apr. 23. 



Joint Winers 

Jollv Fish Aug. 19. 

Pencil Mania Dec. 9. 

Piano Tuners Nov. 1 1 . 



Plane Dumb June 2S 7 

Pets and Pans May 14 8 

Redskin Blues July 23 7 

Spanish Twist A Oct 14 R 

Tuba Tooter, The June 4. 



STATE RIGHTS 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



Title 

ATLANTIC FILM 

Playgrounds in the Sky 10 Nov. 5 

Sportsmen's Paradise 10 July 30 

CAPITAL 

Isle of Isolation 10 July 30 

CENTRAL FILM 

A Pilgrimage Through Palestine 10 Deo. 3 

In Old New Orleans May 28 

Syria May 21 

FEATURETTES, INC, 

A Night in the Jungle 10 Apr. 30 

Holy Men of India 10 May 7 

IDEAL 

Evolution 28 Sept 3 

MARY WARNER 

Glimpses of Germany 8 

Playgrounds in the Sky I reel 

Sportman's Paradise, A I reel 

Springtime on the Rhine 7 

The Mosel 8 Oct 15 

Trier, Oldest City in 
Germany 6 

Winter in the Bavarian Alps I reel 

Young Germany Goes Ski- 
ing I reel 

MASTER ART PRODUCTS 
Melody Makers Series 
No. I — Sammy Fain 



. Dec. 24 



OLYMPIAD PRODUCTIONS 
Tenth Olympiad 19 Apr. 2 

PRINCIPAL 

Cock-Eyed Animal World 35 July 23 

Get That Lion 29 Aug. 27 

Isle of Desire 3 reels 

Isle of Peril 32 July 16 

Isles of Love I reel 

Killing the Killer II July 30 

Mexico 43 June II 

Primitive I reel 



IS 



STANLEY 

An Old City Sneaks 

I Love a Parade 

Pen. Vim and Vigor 7 

Sponge Divers of Tarpon Nov. 2 



UFA 

Cod Liver Oil Preferred 22 June II 

Last Pelicans in Europe 10 May 7 

Steel 10 May 21 



UNITED ARTISTS 



Title 
MICKEY MOUSE 
I. Mickey's Nightmare Aug. 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



Trader Mickey Aug. 26 7 

3. The Whoopee Party Sept 16. 

4. Touchdown Mickey Oct. 7. 

5. The Wayward Canary... Oct. 28. 

6. The Klondike Kid Nov. 18. 

7. Mickey's Good Deed Dec. 9. 



7'/j. 



.Oct 



7 Nov. 12 

61/2 

7'/4 



8. 



SILLY SYMPHONIES 

1. Bears and Bees July IS. 

2. Just Dogs Aug. 12. 

3. Flowers and Trees Sept 9. 



61/2 

7 

8 Oct 



IS 



4. Bug in Love Sept. 21 7 

5. King Neptune Oct 7 7 Oct 29 

6. Babes in the Wood Dec. 2 8 

7. Santa's Workshop Dec. 30 7 Dec. 24 



UNIVERSAL 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



Title 

OSWALD CARTOONS 

Busy Barber Sent 12 I reel 

Carnival Capers Oct. 10 1 reel 

Catnipped May 

Day Nurse Aug. 

Foiled Apr. 

Jungle Jumble, A July 

Let's Eat Apr. 

Making Good Apr. 

Oswald, the Plumber Jan. 

Teacher's Pest Dee. 

To The Rescue May 

Wet Knight A June 20 

Wild and Wooly Nov. 21 

Winged Horse May 



23 7 June 25 

I I reel 

25 

4 I reel 

25 7 Apr. 30 

II 7 July 23 

I6,'33... 7 

19 

23 

reel 

reel 

t I reel 



POOCH CARTOONS 



Athlete. The Aug. 29 

Butcher Boy, The Sept 26 

Cat and Dogs Dec. 5 

Crowd Snores. The Oct 24 

Merry Don. The Jan. 2.'33.. 

Terrible Troubador, The I reel 

Underdog, The Nov. 7 I reel 



8 Sent 10 

7 Sept 17 

I reel 

I reel 

I reel 



7 May 21 



RADIO REELS 

Morton Downey — No. I Oct. 31 2 reels 

With Vincent Lopez 

The Street Singer Nov. 14 2 reels 

Nick Kenny— No. I 

Morton Downey — No. 2 Nov. 28 2 reels 

With Brown and 
Henderson 

Art Jarrett Dec. 12 2 reels 

Nick Kenny — No. 2 
Down Memory Lane Dec. 26 

Louis Sobol — No. I 

With Texas Guinan 
I Know Everybody and 

Eveabody's Racket Jan. 23, '33. 

Walter Winchell— No. I 

With Paul Whiteman 



I reel 



December 31, 1932 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



89 



(THE RELEASE CHAKT—CCNT't) } 



Running Tims 
Re!. Date Minutes Reviewed 



Title 
SPORT REELS 

Ruuoing with Paddock Apr. II 10 ... 

Chas. Paddock 

Victory Plays May 2 9 

Tilden Tennis Reel 

STRANGE AS IT SEEMS SERIES 
No. 18 — Novelty' Apr. 



-Aor. 
.May 



23 



No. 19 — Novelty May 

No. 20 — Novelty July 



16. 
18. 



reel 
reel 



.May 14 



No. 21— Novelty Aug. 22 I reel 

No. 22— Novelty Sept. 19 I reel 

No. 23— Novelty Oct. 17 I reel 

No. 24 — Novelty Nov. 14 I reel 

No. 25— Novelty Dec. 12 I reel 

No. 26— Novelty Jan. 9,'33... I reel 

UNIVERSAL BREVITIES 

Bool Dec. 28 I reel 

Dr. Jekyll's Hide Sept. 26 9 

Good Old Days. The Nov. 21 I reel 

Greeks Had No Words for 

Them, The Oct. 24 I reel 

Lizzie Strata Jan. 23,'33... I reel 

Runt Page. The Apr. II I reel 

Unshod Maiden. The Apr. 18 I reel 



Oct. 



.18 
. 17. 



.May 21 



29 2 reels 

13 2 reels 

I 2 reels 

10 2 reels 

5 21 Mar. 

20 16 Mar. 



26 
26 



UNIVERSAL COMEDIES 
(1931-32 SEASON) 
Around the Enuator on 

Roller Skates July 28 2 reels 

Around the World In 18 

Minutes June 15. 

Dancing Daddies 

E. Lambert 

Doctor's Orders June 

Hollywood Kids July 

Foiled Again June 

Hollywood Handicap. A Aug. 

In the Bag Aor. 

Marriage Wow, The Apr. 

Bert Reach . ._ . 
Meet the Princess May 4 17 Apr. 16 

Slim Summerville 
(1932-33 SEASON) 
Boys Will Be Boys Nov. 

Frank Albertson 
Family Troubles Jan. 

Henry Armetta 
Finishing Touch Oct. 

Skeets Gallagher-June Clyde 
Hesitating Love Nov. 

L. Fazenda-M. Prevost 
Kid Glove Kisses Sept. 

Slim Summerville 
Lights Out Dec. 

James Gleason 
My Operatloii Dec. 

VInce Barnett-June Clyde 
Officer, Save My Child Nov. 

Slim Summerville 
Rockabye Cowboy Jan. 

James Gleason 
Union Wages Aug. 

Louise Fazenda 
Who, Me Sept. 

Frank Albertson 
Yoo Hool Oct. 

James Gleason 



30 2 reel* 

1 1, '33... 2 reels 

19 2 reels 

18 2 reels 

21 2 reels 

14 2 reels 

28 2 reels 

2 2 reels 

2S,'33. . . 2 reels 

31 20 Sept. 17 

7 2 reels 

5 21 Sept. 3 



VITAPHONE SHORTS 

Running Time 

Title Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

ADVENTURES IN AFRICA 2 reels 

BELIEVE IT OR NOT— I reel 

ROBERT L. RIPLEY 

BIG STAR COMEDIES 

No. 6— Shake a Log 17 

Thelma White and Fanny 

Watson _ , 
No. 7— The Perfect Suitor 2 reels 

Benny Rubin „ „ 

No. 8— Maybe I'm Wrong 18 May 28 

Richy Craig. Jr. „ „ , 

No. 9— The Toreador 17 May 7 

Joe Penner .„ „ _ 
No. 10— On Edge 19 May 7 

Wm. and Joe Mandel 
No. II— Poor but Dishonest 2 reels 

Thelma White and Fanny 

Watson . , 

No. 12— In the Family 2 reels 

Thelma White and Fanny 
Watson 

BIG V COMEDIES 

No. I — Sherlock's Home 

Jack Haley 

No. 2 — Here. Prince 

Joe Penner 

No. 3— You Call It Madness 

RIchy Craig. Jr. 
No. 4 — Hey, Pop 

Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle 
No. 5 — Then Came the Yawn 

Jack Haley 

No. 6 — The Run Around 

William Demarest 
No. 7 — Trouble Indemnity 

Codee and Orth 
No. 8— The Build-Un 

Jack Haley 

BOOTH TARKINGTON SERIES 

No. 7— Hot Dog ! reel 

No. 8 — Penrod's Bull Pen I reel 

Billy Hayes-Dave Gorcey 

BROADWAY BREVITIES 

No. 7— Sea Lsis ^ 19...... Apr. 23 

No. 8— Absentmlnded ADner 2 reels 

Jack Haley ■ ■ 

No. 9— A Regular Trouper 19 July 23 

Ruth Etting , . 

No. 10— A Mail Bridi 18 June 4 

Ruth EttlDI 

No. II — Artistic Temper 

Ruth Etting , 
No. 12— What «n Idea 18 June 25 

Harriet Hllllard 



Title 



BROADWAY BREVITIES 
(NEW SERIES) 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



No. I — Passing the Buck 2 reels- 
No. 2 — ^TiD. Tan. Toe 

No. 3 — A Modern Cinderella 

No. 4 — The Red Shadow 

No. 5 — Sky Symphony 

No. 6 — Poor Little Rich Boy 

No. 7 — Yours Sincerely 

No. 8 — That Goes Double 

No. 9 — Win, Lose or Draw... 



HOW TO PLAY GOLF- 
BOBBY JONES 



. I reel 
(each) 



LOONEY TUNES SERIES 

No. 8 — Bosko's Party 7 May 7 

No. 9 — Bosko and Brujio 7 Dec. 10 

No. 10 — Bosko's Dog Race 8 July 8 

No. II — Bosko at the Beach 7 Nov. 5 

No. 12 — Bosko's Store 7 

No. 13 — Bosko the Lumber- 

jack 

LOONEY TUNES 
(NEW SERIES) 

No. I— Ride Him, Bosko 

No. 2 — Bosko the Drawback 

No. 3 — Bosko's Dizzy Date 

No. 4 — Bosko's Woodland Daze 

No. 5 — Bosko in the Ditch 

No. 6 — Bosko in Person 

MELODY MASTERS 
(NEW SERIES) 

No. I — Music to My Ears 

Jack Denny and Band 

No. 2 — Municipal Band Wagon 

No. 3 — Smash Your Baggage 

Small's Paradise Band 
No. 4 — The Lease Breakers 9 Dee. 3 

Aunt Jemima 

No. 5— The Yacht Party 

Roger Wolfe Kahn's Band 
No. 6 — Hot Competition 

The Continentals-Barrls- 

Whiteman-Ted Husino 

No. 7 — Abe Lyman and Band 

No. 8— "How's Tricks?" 

Jean Sareent-Georqe Owen and Gang 
No. 9— That's the Spirit 

Noble Sissle and Band 

MERRY MELODIES (New Series) 

No. I— You're Too Careless with Your Kisses 8 Dec. 17 

No. 2—1 Wish I Had Wings 

No. 3 — A Great Big Bunch of You 

No. 4 — Three's a Crowd 

No. 5 — Shanty Where Santa Claus Lives 

MERRY MELODIES 
SONG CARTOONS 

No. 5 — Red Headed Baby 7 

No. 6 — Pagan Moon 7 

No. 7 — Freddie the Fresh- 
man 7 Mar. 12 

No. 8 — Crosby. Colurabo 

and Vallee 7 Apr. 2 

No. 9— Goopy Gear 6 Apr. 30 

No. 10— It's Got Me Again 6 June II 

No. II— Moonlight for Two 7 July 2 

No. 12— The Oueen Was in . . ■ », 

the Parlor 7 July 23 

No. 13 — I Love a Parade 7 

THE NAGGERS SERIES 

MR. AND MRS. JACK NORWORTH 

The Naggers' Anniversary I reel 

The Naggers at the Opera •; i 

The Naggers Go Ritzy 10 June 4 

Spreading Sunshine 10..... .Apr. z» 

Movie Dumb I reel 

Four Wheels— No Brakes 10 July 30 



NOVELTIES 

Bigger They are. The 2 reels 

Prime Camera 
Gynsy Caravan ' reel . 

Martinelli 

Handy Guy. The 2 reels 

Earl Sande , , 

Rhythms of a Big City I reel . 

Season's fireetings. The 5 

Christmas Special 

Trip to Tibet. A I reel . 

Washington. The Man and 

the Capital '8 

Clarence Whitehlll 



ONE-REEL COMEDIES 



Baby Face 

Victor More 
Military Post, The.. 

Roberto Guzman 
No-Account, The .. 

Hardie-Hutchison 
No Questions Asked. 

Little Billy 
Strong Arm, The . . 

Harrington-O'Neill 



ORGAN SONG-NATAS 

For You ; I reel 

Organ-Vocal 

Say a Little Prayer for Me I reel 

Organ-Vocal 

When Your Lover Has Gone I reel 

Organ-Vocal 

JOE PENNER COMEDIES 

Moving In 2 reels 

Rough Sailing IB.... 

Stutterless Romance. A I reel 

Where Men Are Men 2 reels 

PEPPER POT SERIES 

No. II — Napoleon's Bust 10 June 25 

Dan Coleman-Ted Husing 

No. 12— Featurette Movie Album 

No. 13— Movie Album Thrills 10 July 23 



Running Time 

Title Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

PEPPER POT 
(NEW SERIES) 

No. I — Rambling Round Radio Row No. I 

No. 2— Nickelette 

No. 3 — Contact 

No. 4— If I'm Elected 

No. 5 — King Salmon 

No. 6 — Rambling Round Radio Row No. 2 

No. 7 — Babe 0' Mine 

No. 8 — Dangerous Occupations 

No. 9 — Out of the Past 

No. 10 — Love Thy Neighbor 

No. II — Rambling Round Radio Row No. 3 

No. 12— A Whale of a Yarn 

No. 13 — Africa Speaks — English 

No. 14 — Rambling Round Radio Row No. 4 

No. 15 — Inklings 

No. 16 — Parades of Yesterday 

No. 17— Mississippi Suite 

No. 18— Little White Lies 

No. 19 — Rambling Round Radio Row No. 5 

No. 20— You're Killing Me 

No. 21— Old Time News Reel 

No. 22 — Rambling Round Radio Row No. 6 

No. 23— Around the World in 8 Minutes 8 Aug. 20 

SPORTSLANT SERIES- 
TED HUSING 



No. 8 I reel 

No. 9 I reel 

No. 10 I reel 

No. II I reel 

No. 12 I reel 

No. 13 I reel 



SPORTSLANT SERIES (New) 
TED HUSING 



reel 



No. I 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 4— Old Time Snort Thrills. 



S. S. VAN DINE MYSTERY SERIES 

(Donald Meek-John Hamilton) 

No. 2— The Wall Street Mystery 

No. 3— The Week- End Mystery 

No. 4 — Symphony Murder Mystery 

No. S — Studio Murder Mystery 

No. 6 — Skull Murder Mystery, The 2 reels 

No. 7 — The Cole Case 20... ...Apr. 23 

No. 8 — Murder in the Pullman 20 June 4 

No. 9 — ^The Side Show Mystery 20 June II 

No. 10 — Campus Mystery. The 

No. II — Crane Poison Case,- The 

No. 12 — Transatlantic Mystery, The 22 Sept. 10 



TECHNICOLOR MUSICAL REVUES 

No. I — Cost Paree 

No. 2— Tee for Two 16 Nov. 12 

No. 3— Hey! Hey! Westerner 16 Oct. 15 

No. 4 — Northern Exposure 

No. 5 — Piekin' a Winner 16 Sept. 17 

No. 6 — Pleasure Island 

TWO-REEL COMEDIES 

Dandy and the Belle. The 

Frank McGlynn, Jr.-Mary 
Murray 

Freshman Love 

Ruth Etting 

Old Lace 

Ruth Etting 

WORLD TRAVEL TALKS— 
E. M. NEWMAN 

No. I — Little Journeys to 
Great Masters I reel 

No. 2 — Southern India 9 

No. 3 — Road to Mandalay I reel 

No. 4 — Mediterranean By- 
ways 9 

No. 5 — Javanese Journeys 9 

No. 6 — Northern India I reel 

No. 7 — Oberammergau I reel 

No. 8 — South American 
Journeys 9 June 25 

No. 9 — Soviet Russia I reel 

No. 10 — Paris Glimpses 9 July 30 

No. II — Dear Old London , I reel 

No. 12 — When In Rome 9 June 18 

No. 13 — Berlin Today 9 Oct. 29 

WORLD ADVENTURES 

E. M. NEWMAN (New Series) 

No. I — Dancing Around the World I reel 

No. 2 — Transportations of the World I reel 

No. 3 — An Oriental Cocktail 10 Oct. 8 

No. 4 — Curious Customs of the World I reel 

No. 5 — From Bethlehem to Jerusalem I reel 

No. 6— High Spots of the Far East 10 Sept. 10 

No. 7 — Main Streets I reel 

No. 8 — Beauty Spots of the World I reel 



SERIALS 

UNIVERSAL 

(EACH SERIAL 12 EPISODES OF TWO REELS) 

Running Time 

Title Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 
Air Mall Mystery Mar. 28 IS Apr. 18 

Jas.- Flavln-Lucllle Browne (each) 
Clancy of the Mounted Feb. 27,'33 

Tom Tyler-Jacguellne Wells 
Detective Lloyd Jan. 4 20 Jan. 16 

Jack Lloyd (each) 
Heroes ef the West June 20 18 June 18 

Noah Berry. Jr. (each) 
Lost Special Dec, 5 

Frank Albertson 

Jungle Mystery Sept. 12 20 

Tom Tyler (each) 



90 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



December 3 1. 1 932 



CLASSIFIEI^ 
ADVECTISINe 



OP 



the great 
national medium 
for showmen 



Ten cents per word, money-order or check with copy. Count initials, box number and address. Minimum insertion, 
$ I . Four insertions for the price of three. Contract rates on application. No borders or cuts. Forms close 
Mondays at 5 P.M. Publisher reserves right to reject any copy. Address correspondence, copy and checks to 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD, Classified Dept., 1790 Broadway, New York City. 



I^EPAII^ SEI^VICE 



WE CAN RECOMMEND YOU TO RELIABLE 
concerns who repair all sorts of theatre equipment. - 
Let us know your needs. BOX 117A, MOTION; 
PICTURE HERALD. S 



USED ECDIPAiENT 



DISTRESS SALE - COMPLETE EQUIPMENT, 
including lease — Simplexes, Peerless, Rectifiers, Acces- 
sories, Screens, Drapes, Carpets, Box Office, Ticket 
Register, Upholstered Chairs etc. BOX 255, MOTION 
PICTORE HERALD. ^ 

c 

j 

MARKETS FLOOD ED-EVERY DAY BRINGS NEW 
Opportunities— Consult S.O.S. Before Buying:— Bar- 
gains Weber Syncrofilm, LeRoy, Mellaphone, RCA.J 
Universal, Toneograph, Pacent Soundheads, $35.00 up;j 
Radiart, Operadio, Samson, Webster Amplifiers,; 
$17.50 up; Jensen, DeCoster, RCA, Racon, Macy.^ 
Speakers, $12.95 up. Cash paid for used equipment.} 
S.O.S. CORP., 1600 Broadway, New York. i 

. ^ i 

BARGAINS FOR THE NEW YEAR: SIMPLEX 
mechanism rebuilt, $135.00, complete, $175.00; Peerless 
low intensity, $110.00: Powers mechanism rebuilt, 
$40.00; complete 6-B, $85.00; 15 ampere rectifiers, with' 
rectifier bulbs, $35.00. Bargains in sanitary supplies;^' 
machine parts, all theatre accessories always on hand.j 
Get our prices. Tell us your troubles. CROWNS 
MOTION PICTURE SUPPLIES, 311 W. 44th St.,' 
New York City. I 



UNUSUAL BARGAINS IN USED OPERA- 
Chairs, Sound E^juipment, Moving Picture Machines, » 
Screens, Spotlights, Stereopticons, etc. Projection] 
Machines Repaired. Send for catalogue H. MOVIEi 
SUPPLY COMPANY, 844 S. Wabash Ave.. Chicago. ^ 



TWO GUARANTEED REBUILT SIMPLEX 
projectors with Strong senior reflector lamps, $545.00. > 
Cash buys this Phenomenal Bargain. POSTOFFICE 
BOX 2042, DeSoto Station, Memphis, Tenn. 



TWO REBUILT SIMPLEX MACHINES COM-J 
plete; look and will work like new. for $400.00. BOX 
334, MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 



FOR SALE: DICTAPHONE COMPLETE WITH 
dictating and transcribing machines. Also shaving 
machine. Price $350. Perfect working condition. 
Write BOX 138, MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 
1790 Broadway, New York City. 



r)|^INTINe SEI^VICE 



THEATRICAL PRINTING A SPECIALTY. STA- 
tionery and advertising circulars. Fine work at low 
cost. BOX llOA, MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
1790 Broadway, New York City. 



TI^AILEI^S 



SOUND TRAILERS— YOUR COPY. 8c FT. NO 
charge for cards. Advance strips, 6Sc. MISSOURI 
FILM LABORATORIES, 1704 Baltimore, Kansas City, 
Mo. 



GENEI^AL ECUIE^AiENT 



TRUST BUSTING PRICES ON QUALITY SOUND 
Equipment — S.O.S. Brings 'Em Down — $179.70 Does 
It — Bausch Lomb Cinephor Optical Systems; RCA 
type Sprockets; W. E. type Soundgates; G. E. Exciter 
Lamps; Genuine RCA Photocells. U. S. Government 
Specifications. Install and service yourself. Dealers 
Protected. S.O.S. CORP., 1600 Broadway. Cable: 
"Sosound," New York. 



HERE'S TO YOU: A VERY BRIGHT AND 
Happy New Year: 'B' battery eliminator guaranteed 
noiseless, $15.50; Western Electric speaker unit, $25.00; 
Photo cells Western Electric, $7.50, RCA $5.00; 
complete equipments at very cheap prices. CROWN 
MOTION PICTURE STJPPLIES, 311 West 44th St., 
New York City. 



HIGH GRADE LENSES AT A REAL BARGAIN. 
BOX 245, MOTION PICTURE HEKALD. 



NEW ECUIPMENT 



NEW YEAR BRINGS NEW DEAL^REAL QUAL- 
ity Prices Never Lower — S.O.S. Leads — IS" Film Cabi- 
nets, $1.95 section; Simplex Magazines, $15.95; Simplex 
Lenses, $6.75; Folding Microscopes, 89c; Simplex 
Eyeshields, $2.62; Microphones, $1.18 up; Steel Curtain 
Track, $1.69 ft.; Synchronous Motors, $12.95; Acous- 
tical Felt, 22V2C sq. yd.; RCA Professional Projectors, 
$395.00; Portable Soundfilm Projectors complete, $2.95; 
Beaded Soundscreens, 29c ft.; Catalog mailed. Dealers 
protected. S.O.S. CORP., 1600 Broadway, New York. 



TI^AININe $cne€L$ 



LEARN MODERN THEATRE MANAGEMENT. 
Approved home-study training in Theatre Manage- 
ment, Advertising and Technics. Send for catalog. 
THEATRE MANAGERS INSTITUTE, 315 Washing- 
ton St.. Elmira. New York. 



PATENTS 



PATENT YOUR IDEAS— SEND ME YOUR 
sketch or explanation for confidential advice. Z. H. 
POLACHEK. Registered Patent Attorney- Engineer, 
1234 Broadway. New York. 



BUSINESS 
STIMULATCRS 



SEND ONE DOLLAR FOR BRAND NEW 
business getter. Original tried and proveti in my own 
theatre. No contest, prizes or catch. FRED H. 
STROM. Lyra Theatre, Minneapolis. Minn. 



PCSITICNS WANTED 



THEATRE MANAGER— AT LIBERTY DECEM- 
ber first. Will manage one or more theatres and make 
them pay. Expert publicist. Community builder. Ref- 
erences. Salary right. HARRY L. MOLLER, Belle- 
fontaine, Ohio. 



THEATRES WANTED 



THOROUGHLY EXPERIENCED THEATRE 
manager wishes to rent or lease motion picture 
theatres within thirty miles of New York. Must be 
sound proposition, state all in first letter. WILLIAM 
A. LEVY, Oaremont Sound Film Studios, Inc., 138 
W. 124th St.. New York City. 



WANTED — TO LEASE FULLY EQUIPPED 
theatre — doing business — Indiana, Illinois or Wiscon- 
sin. Give full details first letter. BOX 254, MOTION 
PICTURE HERALD. 



TO RENT OR BUY, THEATRE IN CITY OF 
10,000 or over. Must be doing nice business and bear 
closest investigation. Prefer North or South Carolina 
or South. BOX 249, MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 



TO RENT OR LEASE FOR SUMMER STOCK. 
Small theatre now closed in town with no competition. 
Must be close to New York City. Small auditorium 
preferred. State all in first letter. BOX 113A, 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 1790 Broadway. New 
York City. 



TECHNICAL ECCrS 



BY POPULAR REQUEST-STILL MORE AVAIL- 
able — Prices Cut. "Sound Projection," "Servicing 
Projection Equipment," "Simplified Servicing of Sound 
Equipment"; last two just off press. All three, $15.00 
value, $3.95. Individually, $1.50. S.O.S CORP, 1600 
Broadway, New York. 



"RICHARDSON'S HAND BOOKS OF PROJEC- 
tion" in three volumes. Universally accredited as the 
best and most practical. Aaron Nadell's "Projection 
Sound Pictures." Complete information on sound 
equipment. Both text books complete for $12.80. 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD BOOKSHOP. 1790 
Broadway, New York City. 



WANTED TC DDY 



CASH FOR SIMPLEX MACHINES. STRONG. 
Peerless or any make low intensity lamps. BOX 333, 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 



REAL CASH FOR PEERLESS- STRONG-MORE- 
lite. Other reflector arc lamps; motor generators; 
rectifiers, Simplex machines and portables. POST- 
OFFICE BOX 2042— DeSoto Station, Memphis, Tena. 



The biggest 
mechanical factor 
in today's movies 

EASTMAN Super-sensitive "Pan" has caused 
such widespread changes and improvements 
that it easily rates as the biggest mechanical 
factor in the excellence of today s motion 
picture. On the foundation supplied by this 
film, cameramen, directors, actors, and labo- 
ratories have been able to build a motion 
picture art as far ahead of old techniques as 
movies on the original Eastman "Pan" were 
ahead of color-blind photography... Eastman 
Super-sensitive "Pan" finds its fullest possible 
expression with the gray-backed base on 
which it is now supplied. Eastman Kodak 
Company. (J. E. Brulatour, Inc., Distributors, 
New York, Chicago, Hollywood) 

EASTMAN SUPER-SENSITIVE 

PANCHROMATIC NEGATIVE (gray-backed) 



WHO MAKES STRONG WOMEN WEAK? 




Clark Gable 

WHO MAKES WEAK 
WOMEN STRONG? 

Clark Gable 



WHO'S GOING TO 
PACK THEM IN BE- 
CAUSE IT'S POSITIVE- 
LY HIS BEST PICTURE? 




G-QBLE 






. Her Own 

MROTHy MflCKfllll 

Q Qaramount Qicture 





f^OTION PICTtRC 





^CONSOLIDATION OF EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD AND MOTION PICTURE NEWS 




OP 




2,000-FOOT 
REELS PROPOSED 

New uniform practices suggesfed by 
Academy also call for standardized script 
format, print quality, film preservatives 

PUBLIX RETURNS 
50 TO COMERFORD 

Between sixty-five and seventy per cent 
of Paramount's nationwide circuit of 
theatres already is decentralized 



MOTION PICTURE STOCKS IN THE YEAR 1932 



GAIN THE INDUSTIIY'S ANNUAL 



ONORS-ARI 



THE 



BOX; 



OFFICE 



,.0-» 



S^HOWEI^ED 




Best- p, 



Best 



•in 



N M-G-MI 



the 



Am 

Will M'G'M top 
the list again. 
We thinK so. 



> 



Next compmv ' 



THE 



1 



212 CRITICS 

vt^R'S BEST PlC^H^fs 



Let an M-G-M smi'/e 
he your umbrella on 
a rainy . . . rainy day!" 






. . .With our 



NEW PRESIDENT 



0 




ivery day brings 




I AM A FUGITIVE 



FROM A CHAIN GANG" 



"Not only the best of all the American features 
produced during 1932, but one of the best pic- 
tures that has ever been made in this country." 

—National Board of Revietv 



Every schoolboy knows the 
A B C of picture business— 



Arliss 
Barthelmess 
Cagney 
Daniels (Bebe) 
Edw. G. Robinson 
Fairbanics, Jr. 
George Brent 
Joe E. Brown 
Joan Blondeii 
Kay Francis 



John Public is 
saving up now 
lor their 



Lyie Talbot 
uni 

Powell (Wm.) 
Ruth Chatterton 
Stanwyck 
Terry (Sheila) 
Vinson (Helen) 
Warren William 
Young (Loretta) 



NEW HITS 



"Silvei^ollar" 
"Lif^egins" 
"Three On a Match" 



/# 



Blessed Event^^ 



^^ The Mouthpiece^^ 
^^The Crowd Roars^^ 

''Union Depot'' 



taught the trade a lesson they'll i!ifinn§et! This 
year more than ever exhibitors are going to look 

to WARNERS asj^i 




Paris sets the style in clothes.,. 



Warners set 1^1^ 

STYLES in shows ! 



Remember! 

''Blessed Event" 
"I Am a Fugitive" 
"TheMouthpiece" 
"Dark Horse" 
"Union Depot" 



Watch! 

"42nd Street" 
"Hard to Handle" 
"Employees* Entrance" 
"Blondie Johnson" 
"Grand Slam" 



□ 



And here's the year when you 
cash in on the rich supply of 



NEW STARS 

Warners have been 
building for you ! . . . 




ALINE MacMAHON 
BETTE DAVIS 
ANN DVORAK 
DICK POWELL 
GLENDA FARRELL 
HAROLD HUBER 
PRESTON FOSTER 



GUY KIBBEE 
FRANK McHUGH 
ELEANOR HOLM 
RUBY KEELER 
ALLEN JENKINS 
CLAIRE DODD 
PATRICIA ELLIS 



Ring out, 
Wild Belles, 




^STREET/ 



16 STARS 
200 GIRLS 



"Warners have unearthed a new slant on American 
psychology." — A^. Y. Telegraph, Feb., 1932 

"Warners are bringing dynamically powerful atmosphere 
back in as the movie art threatens to become effete." 

—TV. Y. Sun, May, 1932 

"Your pictures have been a lifesaver to us^ — head and 
shoulders above all others." 

— Fred Leiberman, Mass. Exhibitor, June, 1932 

"Your company in the past season turned out more hits 
than any other two companies in the business." 

— fVm. Cadoret, Rochester, N.Y ., Exhibitor, June, 1932 

" Warner Bros, are setting 'the pace on pictures with an 
ultra-modern touch." —Film Daily, July, 1932 

"Forty percent of all 3-star and 4-star pictures for the 
past six months have been Warner Bros." 

— Liberty, Dec, 1932 

" Everyone should give a rising vote of thanks to Warner 



Bros." 



—Movie Classic, Dec, 1932 



go on with the story 

, "1933... 



And r 



tmmy 



CAGNEYS 

next is going to be 





Ask Cincinnati,^' 
Scranton, Bingham- 
t o n , New Yo r k , 
about Warden Lawes' 



20,000 YEARS 
IN SING SING 



(A First National Picture) 



They'll show you just how big it is, 
*in pre-release engagements ! 



V><hicago Tribune takes a full 
page to tell you you're going 
to get "THE FIRST LADY OF 
THE SCREEN" when you get 





VITAPHONE 
^ SHORTS 



And the Chatterton / ^ 

picture you asked us / /\ 

to make, comes to ' 

the Roxy, Jan. 6th — \ 



RUTH 



CHATTER 



lit 



'Trisco Jenny" 

(A First National Picture) 



EE 




See wax figures turn 

to human beings... 
See human beings turn to wax! 





And more of 
Warners' new- 
profit 




.•4-STAR 
WESTERNS 



Starring the new Saturday 
Matinee Idol — 



JOHN WAYNE 



"Give me a job 
— a^ any price!" 





EMPLOYEES 
ENTRANCE 



J 



(A First National Picture) 



probes the most pressing moral 
problem of our times!— Starring 
Warren William — Loretta Young 



And 13 More of 1933's Ace Attractions 

READY NOW! 

WILLIAM POWELL In "LAWYER MAN"* 

GEORGE ARLISSin "THE KING'S VACATION"* 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS, JR. in "PARACHUTE 
JUMPER"* 

"BLONDIE JOHNSON" with Joan Blondell- 
Chester Morrist 

"GRAND SLAM" with ALL-STAR CAST* 

WARREN WILLIAM in "THE MIND READER"t 

BARTHELMESS in "CENTRAL AIRPORr't 

KAY FRANCIS - GEORGE BRENT in "THE 
KEYHOLF'* 

LORETTA YOUNG in "SHE HAD TO SAY YES"t 

BETTE DAVIS in "EX-LADY"* 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS, JR. in "SUCKER"* 

"BLUE MOON MURDER CASP' with ALL- 
STAR CAST* 

JAMES CAGNEY in "PICTURE SNATCHER"* 



EE 



*A Warner Bros. Picture 
tA First National Picture 



WARNER 
BROS. 

SMASHING 
THRU/ . 



IN 1933! 



VITAGRAPH, INC., DISTRIBUTORS 



URN -7 ms ' 

©CIB 17 8033 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



-i 


Vol. no, No. 2 




/ 

January 7, 1933 



ENTER MR. ROCKEFELLER 

ALMOST inadvertently, it seems, Mr. John D. Rockefeller, 
Jr., has become one of the largest of investors in the 
motion picture, v/hat with the hundred thousand shares 
in RKO held by his Metropolitan Square Corporation on a 
lease adjustment and the very large Rockefeller holdings In 
the Chase National Bank, which has in turn quite a bit of Fox, 
to say nothing of some other odds and ends. This will not do 
the industry a bit of harm — and now once and forever the 
motion picture Is woven completely into the fabric of American 
business. It can never again be a little lone world by itself. 

AAA 
A TRENDLESS SEASON 

THE astute dramatic critics of the New York press have 
been up and down Broadway examining into the prospects 
of the stage for the year and find themselves, and the 
stage, in a pretty pickle. They are unhappy to relate that 
there appear to be no trends, only just a bit of this and that, 
scheduled for now and then, all with a heavy over-mantling of 
maybe. Now a dramatic season without a trend Is just as 
unorthodox as a motion picture season without a cycle. While 
It is upsetting to have things different, it might be observed 
that the cause of entertainment, from the point of view of 
the consumer, can do without trends and cycles for a long 
time. Trends and cycles alike mean production that is based 
on what some one else thought of first. The principle works 
out rather better in the clothing trade than for stage and 
screen. 

Meanwhile, over in Europe there Is a trend, a trend to the 
cheerful. Germany Is having a wave of musical and light 
comedy pictures, so Is France. Denmark and Sweden are 
making comedies. Among American films the important dis- 
tribution successes are Buster Keaton's, Harold Lloyd's and 
farces like "This Is the Night," according to Mr. Albert Deane 
of Paramount International Corporation. 

AAA 

IT WILL PASS 

A SCANNING of the "Headlines of 1932" suffices to 
remind us that there was solid sincerity In Mark Twain's 
' remark: "I am an old man and I have had many troubles, 
most of which never happened." A considerable number of 
burning issues, like "exclusive runs" for example, appear to 
have solved themselves. Time is not only a healer but a 
solvent. It has been related of Napoleon that he had six 
baskets for mail, each devoted to the incoming letters of a 
week, and always gave his attention to the oldest, a week at 
a time. "Because," he explained, "It Is then always too late 
to take someone's foolish advice." There are many important 
matters about which nothing needs to be done. That's our 
favorite decision. 



EVERY little while some writer or speaker, discussing the 
screen, remarks with the flourish of discovery that the 
Chinese have said: "A picture Is better than 10,000 
words," or a thousand words or any other handy figure. The 
old quotation is pretty well worn, but since It seems destined 
to stay in the phrase book it Is about time to restore its 
authenticity. The original Chinese sage did not write It that 
way at all. The editor himself delicately admits excavating 
this adage, some two decades ago, from the ancient Chinese 
as reproduced In a volume published about 1850. The correct 
translation is: "One hundred tellings are not so good as one 
seeing." Practically all Chinese adages and aphorisms are 
worded In this reverse and negative manner. They like them 
that way. 

AAA 

HORSE FEATHERS 

JUST for the record: The board of censors at Palo Alto 
In California has barred "Life Begins". On Leiand Stan-, 
ford's race horse farm at Palo Alto in the '70's, in the 
process of picturing horses In motion, the evolution of the 
motion picture achieved its last link before the screen. Now 
the stork wins. 

AAA 
AFTER BOOZE, WHAT? 

THE motion picture industry, more especially In exhibition 
In the larger centers, has suffered not a little at the hands 
of racketeering union officials. Now that the end of pro- 
hibition seems to be in sight the more competent banditti 
of the rum running syndicates are looking about for new busi- 
ness opportunities, and, If reports are to be credited, with 
acute interest in the possibilities among the labor unions. 
Now Is not too soon for both the Industry and its unions to be 
getting alert. The revelations of the last two years indicate 
with painful clarity what the cost of racketeering control Is 
to both employer and employe. 

AAA 
CONCERNING COWOLOGY 

THE esteemed and Itinerant Mr. J. C. Jenkins of the Herald 
staff, whose work is always where the weather is best, has 
the temerity to write from Texas in disagreement with the 
editor's observation concerning the Influence of wild mustard 
on the cow's contribution to the gelatine component of film. 
He says it isn't mustard at all, but Instead Nebraska alfalfa 
and corn. We've seen some film that suggested jimpson weed. 

AAA 

"One of the troubles with some industries, now and then," 
remarked one of the most able engineers, "Is the Impact of 
kilo-dollars on micro-ideas." 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD MARTIN pUIGLEY. Editor-in-Chief and Publisher 

Incorporating Exhibitor's Herald, founded 1915; Motion Picture News, founded 1913; Moving Picture World, founded 1907; Motography, founded 1909; The Film 
Index, founded 1906. Publish-ed every Thursday by Quigley Publishing Connpany, 1790 Broadway, New York City. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Martin Quigley, Editor-in-Chief 
and Publisher; Colvin Brown, Vice-President and General Manager; Terry Ramsaye, Editor; Ernest A. Rovelstad. Managing Editor; Chicago office, 407 South Dearborn 
street, Edwin S. Clifford, manager; Hollywood office. Pacific States Life Building, Leo Meehan, manager; London office, 41 Redhill Drive, Edgware, London, England, 
W. hi. Mooring, representative; Berlin office, Katharinstrasse 3, Berlin-Halinsee. Germany, Hans Tintner, representative; Paris office, I Rue Gabrielle, Paris 18°, France, 
Paul Gordeaux, representative; Sydney office, 102 Sussex street, Sydney. Australia, Cliff Holt, representative; Mexico City office, James Lockhart, Apartado 269, Mexico 
City, Mexico. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations. All contents copyright 193" by Ouigley Publishing Company. All editorial and business correspondence should 
be addressed to the New York Office. Better Theatres, devoted to the construction, equipment and operation of theatres, is published every fourth week as section 2 
■of Motion Picture Herald. Other puigley Publications: Motion Picture Daily, The Hollywood Herald, The Motion Picture Almanac, published annually, and The Chicagoan- 




Through a Latticed Window . . . 
from the pagoda of the River 
Gods at the gateway to the 
Gorges of the Giant of the 
Yangtse river, Wab Chow Fu, 
China. This is a still representa- 
tive of the pictorial material in- 
cluded in the forthcoming Fox 
Movietone Magic Carpet travel- 
ogue, "The Gorges of the Giant." 



Still photography by 
BONNEY POWELL 



the sti 

[8] 



of the month 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



9 



2,000-FOOT REELS ARE DISCUSSED 
AS BIG ECONOMY TO THE INDUSTRY 



Secretary Cowan of Academy 
Confers with Eastern Leaders 
on Research Council's Pro- 
gram Affecting 10 Practices 

The new standard of a 2,000-foot reel, 
proposed by the Research Council of the 
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and 
Sciences to supplant the present length of 
1,000 feet, was being discussed this week in 
conferences held in New York between Les- 
ter Cowan, executive secretary of the Coun- 
cil, and home office executives of distribu- 
tors, theatres and exchanges and leading 
equipment manufacturers. A complete pro- 
gram of ten major industry practices, which 
were outlined by the various subcommittees 
of the Academy's Research Council last 
month, also covered standardization of non- 
halation tint, quality of release prints, film 
preservatives, development of a silent cam- 
era, more efficient use of the 35mm film 
area, correction of distortion in projection, 
economies in recording, standardization of 
screen illumination for studio review rooms, 
and a standard form for scripts. Summar- 
ized herewith are the reports on the 2000- 
foot reel, format of scripts, print quality, and 
film preservatives. The other subjects will 
be treated in next week's issue. 

Speaking at the meeting, Darryl Zanuck, 
chairman of the Council, described the or- 
ganization and scope of that group. "Specifi- 
cally, our job is to do our utmost in an 
ef¥ort to get pictures of a better quality on 
the screen and to get them there with 
greater efficiency and with a lower net cost," 
Mr. Zanuck said. 

"The original procedure of the Producers- 
Technicians Committee was limited to act 
only on technical matters. The Research 
Council may consider problems of a tech- 
nical nature which concern the actor, di- 
rector and writer as well. It is my inten- 
tion, as I am certain that it is your wish, to 
apply the same principles of cooperation, in- 
vestigation and action to the problems of 
writers, actors and directors that this com- 
mittee has in the past applied to the techni- 
cal field." 

The following summary represents the re- 
ports of the work of various Academy spe- 
cial committees assigned to specific projects 
and presented at the last meeting of the Re- 
search Council, from which sources they will 
probably reach distributors and producers : 

AN EFFECTIVE UNIFORM 
PRACTICE ON REEL LENGTH 

Problem 

In cutting, release printing, distribution, ship- 
ping, and exchange inspection, the producing 
companies are using the reel of from 800 to 
1,000 feet, which has been the established unit 
for many years. Most theatres, however, are 
equipped with 2,000 foot magazines and an in- 
creasing proportion are doubling up the reels 
for projection. The situation is complicated by 
the preference for longer reels among many 
projectionists in first run houses, by the num- 
ber of theatres in which only "-"ne projectionist 
is employed, by the fact that studios are fre- 
quently unable to avoid issuing reels of very 



short length, and by the fact that the ex- 
changes have not been able to enforce penal- 
ties against reel doubling. 

The cost of handling prints in the theatres 
and exchanges is substantially increased by the 
fact that pictures are not distributed and pro- 
jected on the same length reel. Standard Re- 
lease Print leader and trailer is supplied with 
every reel on the assumption that it will be 
used to secure an accurate change-over from 
reel to reel. The added costs of maintaining 
leaders and ends of reels in the exchanges and 
of cutting, doubling and re-splicing tlje reels 
in the theatres are directly chargeable to the 
lack of an established uniform practice on reel 
length. 

Committee 

J. M. Nickolaus, Chairman; S. J. Twining, 
J. J. Milstein, A. J. Guerin, Sidney Burton. 

Objectives 

To secure further data from all companies 
to determine the extent of the practice of reel 
doubling and the annual cost to the industry. 
To determine the most efficient length of reel 
unit, from the viewpoints of production, ship- 
ping, and cost. To particularly investigate the 
feasibility of release in lengths of 1,600 to 1,- 
800 feet, using reels with 4-inch hubs to reduce 
wear on film ends. To carry on development 
of improved designs of shipping reels. To 
study foreign release and disc release in re- 
lation to reel length. To propose a compre- 
hensive program to give the industry the ad- 
vantage on unified action in establishing an ef- 
fective uniform practice. 

Digest of Preliminary Report 

The committee has made a preliminary inves- 
tigation of the costs, difficulties, and detailed 
changes that would be necessary to establish 
a longer unit of reel length that could be in- 

This IVeek 

2,000--foot reels are proposed as big 

saving to industry Page 9 

RKO Roxy Theatre in Radio City is 

successfully opened Page I 1 

Publix now 65 per cent decentralized; 
circuit turns back 50 theatres to 
Comerford Page 10 

Motion picture stocks in the year 1932 Page 17 

Leo Meehan comments on latest prod- 
uct of the studios Page 18 

Highlights of 1932 pass in review Page 30 

FEATURES 

Editorial Page 7 

The Camera Reports Page 13 

Asides and Interludes Page 16 

J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum Page 42 

DEPARTMENTS 

Box Office Receipts Page 38 

Showmen's Reviews Page 23 

Managers Round Table Page 47 

Short Features Page 65 

Technological Page 46 

The Release Chart Page 59 

What the Picture Did for Me Page 43 

Up and Down the Alley Page 65 

Classified Advertising Page 66 



Research Council Proposes 
Methods to Raise Print Qual- 
ity, Standardize Format of 
Scripts, Improve Film Care 

corporated into the Standard Release Print 
specfications as a uniform practice for the in- 
dustry. Tentative specifications were reported 
for a 13^-inch reel (with 4-inch hub) to carry 
a maximum of 1,700 feet. The committee 
recommended that this be used as a basis to se- 
cure further data on costs and savings in the 
individual companies. The committee also rec- 
ommended a revision in the specifications of 
the Academy Standard Release Print make-up 
with the object of securing a saving to the 
industry through the elimination of certain foot- 
age in the leader which is no longer needed. 

Action of Council 

The procedure of the committee to date was 
approved. The committee was authorized to 
communicate the specifications to the individual 
companies with the understanding that these are 
tentative and to serve as a basis for securing 
further data. 

AVERAGE QUALITY OF 
RELEASE PRINTS 

Problem 

Laboratories in Hollywood operated by or in 
close touch with the production studios have es- 
tablished high standards of quality and uniform- 
ity of product. In many cases release prints 
and replacements are made by laboratories lo- 
cated in all parts of the world and under pres- 
ent conditions no company can be sure that these 
will be as good as Hollywood prints obtained 
from the same negative. Measuring instru- 
ments of the various laboratories are not cali- 
brated to any common standard and specifica- 
tions for optimum prints are difficult to set and 
enforce. 

Committee 

L. E. Clark, Chairman; laboratory and soimd 
department executives and commercial labora- 
tory technical executives as committee of the 
whole. 

Objectives 

To formulate and give recognition to those 
desirable standards as to which there is general 
agreement. To bring more forcibly to the 
attention of production executives generally the 
desirability of insuring that the theatre release 
is of as good quality as the answer print. To 
undertake a program along the following lines : 
Standardization of review room projection 
equipment. Establishment of international stand- 
ard reference sensitometer. Establishment of 
standard means for calibrating densitometers. 
Further investigation of the proposal to incor- 
porate a density spot or simplified sensitometric 
strip in negative leader of each reel as means 
of specifying print requirements. 

Digest of Preliminary Report 

After study of the history of the problem to 
date and consideration of the points brought 
together in a previous report by W. C. Harcus, 
the committee offered the following recommen- 
dations : 

a. That no attempt be made to set product 
standards, but that all efforts be directed en- 
tirely toward setting of standards for equip- 
ment. 

b. That the densitometer and sensitometer ap- 

(Continued on page 22) 



10 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



PUBLIX NOW 65% DECENTRALIZED; 
CIRCUIT RETURNS 50 TO COMERFORD 



Former Circuit Owner Gets In- 
terest in Houses in 28 Pennsyl- 
vania and 2 New York Cities; 
Taking Over Management 

Paraniount's nationwide circuit of motion 
picture theatres, variously reported to have 
included from 1,000 to 1,200 properties, has 
been decentralized 65 to 70 per cent. Con- 
summation last weekend of a deal whereby 
the corporation returns approximately 50 
houses in the coal mining sector of Penn- 
sylvania to M. E. Comer ford is the latest 
development in the movement which got 
underway late in October when John Hertz, 
chairman of the finance committee, and rep- 
resenting the bankers, declared for local 
autonomy in the interest of greater economy 
and efficiency. 

Negotiations between Paramount and the 
Comerford interests were drawn out over 
many weeks. The deal gives Mr. Comer- 
ford an interest in the group of theatres in 
Scranton, Wilkes-Barre and other cities in 
Pennsylvania, formerly owned by him and 
sold to Paramount in August, 1930, for a 
sum reported to have been $18,000,000, of 
which about $6,000,000 was supposed to 
have been actually paid. 

In addition to re-acquiring the interest 
in the properties in association with Publix, 
the Comerford group will take over active 
management of the circuit. 

George Walsh, who has been in charge of 
the circuit since it was acquired by Para- 
mount, moves to the company's headquar- 
ters in New York, where he will become 
assistant to Sam Dembow, Jr., who is in 
charge of the theatre department. Frank 
Walker again will play an important part 
in the circuit's operation with Mr. Comer- 
ford. Theatres included in the deal are in 
28 Pennsylvania and two New York cities, 
as follows : 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Bloomberg — Capitol. 

Carlisle — Orpheura, Strand. 

Danville — Ritz. 

Dickson City— Rex. 

Dunnmore — Garden. 

Duryea — Pastime. 

Forest City— Freedman. 

Hazleton— Capitol, Freeley, Grand. 

Honesdale — Lyric. 

Kingston — Kingston. 

Luzerne — Luzerne. 

Mauch Chunk — Capitol. 

Northumberland — Savoy. 

Old Forge— Holland. 

Olypheint— Granada. 

Peu-sons — Parsons. 

Pittston — American, Roman. 

Pittston — Roman. 

Plymouth — Shawnee. 

Pottsville— Capitol, Hippodrome. 

SajTe — Say re. „. , 

Scranton— Bell, Capitol, Globe, Manhattan, Rialto, 

Ritz, Riviera, Roosevelt. 
State— Strand, West Side. 
Shenandoah — Strand. 
Sunbury— Rialto, Strand. 
Towanda — Keystone. 

Wilkes-Barre— Alhambra, Capitol, Hale, Irvmg, Or- 

pheum, Penn, Sterling. 
Jersey Shore — ^Victoria. 

NEW YORK 

Owego— Tioga. 
Waverly — Capitol. 

Decentralization of the Paramount prop- 
erties has proceeded at a rapid pace. The 
more important deals, besides Mr. Comer- 
ford's, included disposition of blocks of 



PROMINENT WOMEN 
SELECT ROXY FILMS 

Howard S. Cullman, now directing 
the original Roxy theatre, has organ- 
ized an "advisory committee on film 
selection," comprising a group of 
prominent New Yorkers, which will 
pass on the film selections for the 
theatre at weekly meetings vAth Mr. 
Cullman in advance of showings. In- 
cluded in the group are Mrs. Oliver 
Harriman, Mrs. Kermit Roosevelt, 
Mrs. Marshall Field, Mrs. Kenneth 
O'Brien and Mrs. Max Rossbach. The 
committee, it is indicated, unll have 
a definite voice in selection. Its for- 
mation is described as "an effort to 
choose films not alone on the basis of 
'trade' or motion picture ideas, but on 
the basis of the best standards and 
real desires of the community, as in- 
terpreted by some of its outstanding 
members." 



theatres in the south to E. V. Richards, em- 
bracing the old Saenger circuit. Mr. Rich- 
ards assumed active management January 
1. Nathan Goldstein took back the former 
Goldstein Brothers houses in New England. 
R. J. O'Donnell and William Jenkins fig- 
ured in a deal including 23 Publix prop- 
erties in Texas. Ed Dubinsky's houses 
were returned and so were groups to E. J. 
Sparks, Wilby-Kincey and others. 

Mr. Dembow, under whose direction the 
movement is proceeding, said in an inter- 
view that the decentralization policy had 
been entirely successful thus far, with dis- 
tinct improvement indicated in some cases, 
although most of the decentralized houses 
have been under local operation for only a 
comparatively short time. Mr. Dembow is 
believed to have reflected the sentiments of 
the management when he said that theatre 
managment was a purely local affair and 
should always be conducted on that basis. 

The ultimate success of the theatre de- 
centralization policy rests with the personal 
ability of owners and managers in the field 
who are now being restored to active part- 
nership, according to Mr. Dembow. Prac- 
tically all the deals thus far have been on 
the basis of operating partnerships. The 
only outright sale definitely known was the 
Sparks group in Florida. Generally, Para- 
mount disposed of a part interest, turned 
over complete management to the second 
party and will participate in profits. 

John Hertz recently gave credit for the 
decentralization plan to Mr. Dembow and 
to Leo Spitz, an executive of the corpora- 
tion. 

Mr. Dembow traced the growth of Pub- 
lix through the pre-depression years, when 
the company built the largest theatre cir- 
cuit in the country, during a time when 
large scale production and operation were 
the order of the day. "During 1928 and 
until the latter part of 1930, when the situa- 
tion definitely changed," he said, "we were 
taking over theatre after theatre and trans- 



New Policy Successful, with 
Definite Improvement Indi- 
cated in Some Cases, Dem- 
bow; Warners Dispose of 7 

ferring its management to our home office 
in New York. With business as good as it 
was at the first period of that organization 
of a nationwide group of theatres, the 
process was justified and immediately re- 
sulted in certain savings. But when we 
reached the fall of 1930, it was obvious that, 
the strain of increasingly poor business con- 
ditions was uncovering much that was 
wrong with the system. 

"In the first place we learned, and learned 
quickly, that the local owners and operators, 
from whom we had taken control of situa- 
tions, were invariably in a better position 
to obtain advantageous deals with their local 
unions, their landlords, civic authorities." 

While decentralization has been practiced 
principally by Paramount, it was announced 
last week by Warner Brothers that seven 
of their theatres in Indiana have been dis- 
posed of to A. W. Sobler and Alexander 
Manta. Houses included in this deal are the 
Hoosier and Capitol, at Whiting; Indiana 
and American, Indiana Harbor ; Bucklen 
and Warner at Elkhart, and the Jefferson, 
Goshen. 



Mentor Pictures 
To Import Films 

A new company. Mentor Pictures, Inc., 
was recently incorporated as a $500,000 
closed corporation for the purpose of im- 
porting scientific, educational, novelty and 
feature motion pictures from Europe. Tem- 
porary offices 'are at 220 West 42 street, 
New York. 

Dr. N. I. Stone, New York, is treasurer 
of the corporation. Joseph L. Young is 
secretary, and W. E. MacKee is vice- 
president. All have been active previously 
in the industry. Hans von Fraunhofer, of 
Fraunhofer and Company, Berlin, is 
European representative of Mentor, with of- 
fices in Berlin, Hamburg, Budapest and 
Vienna. He is also general manager of 
Photochrome Company, Inc., which controls 
the Wolfe-Hiede process of natural color 
production in both 35 and 16 millimeter. 

The first releases of Mentor Pictures in 
the educational and scientific fields will be 
available March IS. Sound tracks for the 
American market will be recorded in New 
York. Silent versions will be edited by 
Thomas Hogan, formerly with Pathe Audio 
Review, who also will be in charge of all 
recording. 



Vitaphone Plant to Close 

The Vitaphone studio, Warner short sub- 
ject plant in Brooklyn, will close on Janu- 
ary 14 for a period of approximately six 
weeks, reopening about March 1. By the 
closing date, the studio will have virtually 
completed its current production schedule. 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



RKO ROXY OPENS AND CLOSES, AS 
MUSIC HALL GOES TO FILM POLICY 



Institution of Motion Picture Re- 
flects Impressively Restrained 
Modernism, Good Taste and 
Theatrical Housekeeping 

BULLETIN 

The new Radio City Music 
Hall is going over to pictures, 
with presentations, at popular 
prices, and the RKO Roxy thea- 
tre was scheduled Thursday to go 
dark pending determination of 
policy. Less than two weeks af- 
ter the two openings, the follow- 
ing notice, signed by William 
Stern, general stage manager, 
was posted late Wednesday night 
upon the call board of the RKO 
Roxy : 

"Due to unforeseen emergen- 
cies it will be necessary to close 
this theatre temporarily, effective 
January 11. This is no reflection 
on anyone's work, but rather a 
necessity which we regret to 
state must be put into effect." 

by TERRY RAMSAYE 

The RKO Roxy Theatre in Radio City, 
the motion picture component of the Rocke- 
feller Center amusement enterprises, is now 
open, successfully open, and there is reason- 
able assurance that there is no revolution in 
the art of exhibition yet in sight. 

The opening program was a standard 
product of the capable showmanship of Mr. 
Samuel L. Rothafel, long familiar to the 
observers of his two decades of successful 
presentation. 

The bill included an overture, a newsreel 
section, a cartoon comedy and a drama, all 
RKO product. There were five stage show 
numbers of varying merit. 

The picture house opening coming on 
Thursday night of last week, only forty- 
eight hours after the opening of the Radio 
City Music Hall by the same showman, two 
squares up Sixth avenue, detailed in these 
pages in the last issue, makes a comparison 
inevitable, even if the projects are not es- 
pecially mutually relevant. To one specta- 
tor at least it appeared that the picture the- 
atre and its show seemed considerably more 
closely attuned to a reasonable conception 
of the world and its people. 

A Theatre of Good Taste 

A theatre of impressively restrained mod- 
ernism and good taste, reflecting and repre- 
senting the sum total of all the technological 
resources of the period, organized and man- 
aged after the manner of theatrical house- 
keeping perfection which is one of the out- 
standing Rothafel contributions, presented 
an entertainment that pleased its audience 
of 3,700. That is a success. 

The opening evening was another most 
gala event, with the ca«t of "Who's Who 



MR. WILL HAYS 
said: 

1 congratulate the motion picture 
art, for which this shall he a dis- 
tinguished show window, and I am 
sure that 1 voice universal public ap- 
preciation. 

But this is not the dedication of a 
theatre — it is a reafirmation of faith 
in Americans indestructible destiny and 
a declaration that we still carry on in 
the tradition of our forefathers. 

Tonight we render tribute to this 
embodiment of American indomitable- 
ness and fearlessness, which rises, like 
a Pharos, out of the blinding fogs of 
irresolution and bewilderment to pro- 
claim that leadership has not failed 
us; that the mighty fortunes of 
America have not deserted their con- 
structive tasks; that the vision of 
great captains is not blurred by de- 
pression, and that our fundamental 
structure and undepleted opportunities 
encourage investment of grander scale 
and vaster scope than the creations 
which line our past. 



and What's What" practically identical with 
the parade of fame and glory at the Music 
Hall opening, including the two hundred 
police, the traffic jams, the newsreel cameras 
and the general excitement. Mr. Rothafel, 
in subdued and modest voice, introduced Mr. 
M. H. Aylesworth, president of RKO and 
the National Broadcasting Company, and he 
in turn presented Mr. Will H. Hays. Mr. 
Hays made a ringing speech of laudations, 
for the motion picture, for the theatre, for 
America and for Mr. Rockefeller. After 
which, at the invitation of Mr. Hays, every 
one stood up for Mr. Rockefeller and then 
the show started. 

The "Dedication Overture" by Mr. Mau- 
rice Baron of the Radio City Theatres staff 
purported to depict the history of Manhat- 
tan Island from the landing of the Dutch 
to the building of Radio City. It was re- 
inforced with a stage tableau, charmingly 
lighted and devoted especially to the time 
the Indians sold the island for twenty-four 
dollars' worth of beads. It seemed fitting 
that this should be commemorated on the 
spot where Roxy had sold Mr. Rockefeller 
so much. 

To the members of the motion picture 
community of Manhattan Island there was, 
or should have been, a thrill of recognition 
in a great shadow play number, wherein a 
slight symbolic dancer cast a vast shadow 
engaged in the enactment of movements 
synchronized with musically assorted sounds 
related to the Machine Age. It vvas the ulti- 
mate, first, and mayhap final, delivery of the 
Titan that Hy Daab advertised for so long. 
He was on the way so long he got to be 
40 feet tall. 

The newsreel was made up of assembled 



First Program Is Standard Prod- 
uct of Capable Showmanship 
of Samuel Rothafel — Hays' 
Speech Rings with Laudations 

cuts in the Roxy manner. It was unexcit- 
edly just newsreel without much news, but 
plenty of reel. News being what it is, noth- 
ing could be done about it. 

Here and there one gets touches in the 
Roxy shows that reflect the fact that he has 
been abroad a bit of late. Some of them in- 
cline one to the wish that he had stayed 
home. One of the "Continental" touches of 
the bill is Mr. Emil Boreo, said to be an 
"internationally noted music hall artist." 
Mr. Boreo did tricks with his hat and 
chanted in speakeasy French. He delayed 
the show quite a while. The Roxy Ballet 
Corps did itself proud with a sparkling per- 
formance and the RKO Roxy Roxyettes and 
chorus presented a number that was a mar- 
vel of beauty and color and a piece of the 
old Roxy glory. The cartoon comedy, 
"Opening Nights," was funny if you felt 
that way. In view of the fact that it did not 
present the best that the screen can do in 
animated cartoonery it did not precisely add 
to the magnificence of the occasion. There- 
upon appeared a vaudeville act, consisting 
of Dave Apollon, a Russian, and his "Mexi- 
can Apollonians," being a string band. Mr. 
Apollon was sure he was funny. He slew 
and dragged in a joke about what Man- 
hattan calls "fairies" and he introduced a 
very spacious young woman who sang "Pic- 
colo Pete" and another number, just as she 
used to at a night club in Paterson, New 
Jersey, and exited the same way, laughing 
and rubbing her hypogastrium. Those two 
touches are new to the Roxy technique. He 
does not need them. 

Feature Up to the Occasion 

The feature drama, "The Animal King- 
dom," produced by RKO and presenting 
Ann Harding, Leslie Howard and Myrna 
Loy, was competently up to the occasion, 
and despite the assorted views of the critics 
massed for the opening, was good motion 
picture. It has been sufficiently reviewed in 
previous issues of Motion Picture 
Herald. 

The architectural charms of the theatre 
kept the first nighters engaged for more 
than an hour before the opening of the pro- 
gram. Last week's issue of the Herald 
presented pictures, and complete description 
and discussion for showmen will be pre- 
sented by Mr. George Schutz in our "Bet- 
ter Theatres" section dated January 14. 



The receipts for the RKO Music Hall, 
keyed by price to $20,000 a day on capacity 
business, and with a forecast of a gross of 
$130,000 for its first week, had at the end 
of its seventh day a total of $106,400, ac- 
cording to estimates quoted by Motion Pic- 
ture Daily. The RKO Roxy, the picture 
house, has been doing relatively better with 
a daily gross in the vicinity of $9,000 and 
the prospect that it would conclude its first 
week with somewhere between $54,000 and 
$60,000, according to The Daily. 



12 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



MGM To Offer 
Contract Feb. 15^ 
Fox February 1 

MGM announced Wednesday that it will 
"offer to exhibitors the optional standard 
license contract and has agreed to lend its 
efforts to promulgating in the industry the 
National Board of Appeals and Concilia- 
tion to hear industry disputes." 

"The optional contracts," it was said, "are 
now being printed and will be offered to 
exhibitors as soon as they are ready, prob- 
ably about February 15." 

MGM thereby joins Fox and Educational 
as officially accepting the Kent proposals. 
As indicated last week, in Motion Picture 
Herald, other companies will individually 
accept the agreement in time for applica- 
tion by February IS. 

Fox officially announced adoption of the 
optional contract effective February 1 and 
acceptance of the proposal of an appeals 
board. 

Jack Pick ford 
Dies in Paris 

Jack Pickford, brother of Mary Pickford 
and himself a wellknown motion picture 
actor, died on Tuesday in the American 
Hospital in Paris following a nervous break- 
down. 

Beginning his screen career with Biograph 
in 1909, while he was still a boy, he later 
headed the Jack Pickford Company and later 
was under contract to Goldwyn, United 
Artists, First National and Universal. 
Among his best known starring pictures 
were "Brown of Harvard," "Gang War," 
and "Exit Smiling." 



Barnstyn^ Rogers 
In New. Company 

Budd Rogers, former sales executive with 
Educational-World Wide, has joined the 
British and Continental Trading Corpora- 
tion where, with J. C. Barnstyn, he is or- 
ganizing a new company to distribute both 
foreign films here and American product 
on the Continent. The pictures made by 
Boston Films, of Berlin, will be distributed 
in this country. Twelve features are ex- 
pected to be available for distribution dur- 
ing 1933, in all key cities. A deal has been 
made with World Wide, Mr. Rogers said, 
for the dubbing of American pictures in 
foreign languages. 



Worthington Butts Dies 

Worthington Butts, former president of 
Butts Litho Company, died suddenly during 
the week in New York. His body was 
shipped to Cleveland for interment on 
Thursday. Shortly before his death Mr. 
Butts had been planning a return to the 
lithograph field. He was one of the first 
lithographers in motion pictures. 



LAEMMLE REPLIES 
TO HERALD EDITOR 

Mr. Carl Laemmle, president of 
Universal, continuing a discussion of 
the influence of the saloon on motion 
picture business and referring to the 
editorial on "Saloon Competition" in 
the Herald, issue of December 24, has 
written to the editor as follows: 
Dear Mr. Ramsaye: 

Yoti say you recall no wave of pros- 
perity which hit the box office with 
the enactment of the Eighteenth 
amendment. But there was one, just 
the same. The closing of saloons 
marked a decided jump in national 
attendance at picture theatres. Some 
of this, of course, went back to the 
speakeasies, but not a very great part 
of it. 

Yoti say also that when I started 
to climb in this business there were 
saloons in Chicago. Yon are correct. 
But along came local option (long 
before the national prohibition law) 
and many saloons were closed. I im- 
mediately suggested to owners that 
they convert their premises into pic- 
ture houses and many of them fol- 
lowed my suggestion with the result 
that I secured new customers for my 
film renting concern. Thus the pic- 
ture business got a direct benefit from 
the closing of saloons. It got another 
when saloons throughout the country 
were closed. 

I hope you understand my point. 
It is not legalizing of beer and booze 
which makes me fear a resultant harm 
to the picture business, but rather the 
return of the open saloon, whether 
called a saloon, a drug store or some 
other kind of a store. And don't fool 
yourself about the competition of beer 
and pretzels. It's mighty strong com- 
petition, my boy! 

Sincerely yours, 
CARL LAEMMLE 



Otterson Lectures Before 
Group on Sound Reproduction 

The results of the most recent research 
in the development of sound recording and 
reproduction in motion pictures, and the 
possibilities of future development form the 
subject of a lecture to be delivered by John 
E. Otterson, president of Electrical Re- 
search Products, Inc., in the Fisk Building, 
New York, on Thursday. The lecture is the 
ninth of a course on "A New Conception 
of the Voice and the New Ways of Repro- 
ducing It," sponsored by the New School 
for Social Research. 

Among the mechanisms which Mr. Otter- 
son was to discuss is the new "hill and dale" 
process of disk recording. 

Selznick Announces Signing 
Of One-Year Contract 

David O. Selznick, on the Coast, has an- 
nounced that he has signed a new one-year 
contract as executive producer in charge of 
RKO Radio production at the Coast studio. 



Florida Theatre 
Provides Annual 
Christmas Party 

More than 6,800 poor and needy children 
of Jacksonville, Fla., on Christmas Day were 
entertained, greeted Santa Claus and were 
presented with toys and candy at the annual 
Christmas Day party of the Happy Hearts 
Club, at the Florida theatre, largest house 
in the circuit of E. J. Sparks. The Florida 
is managed by Guy Kenimer, who handled 
all arrangements for the Christmas Tree 
party. The Junior Chamber of Commerce 
of the city and the Jacksonmlle Journal as- 
sist in the work. 

The children arrive at the theatre by trol- 
ley, free through the courtesy of the trac- 
tion company, by buses furnished by the bus 
lines and by special school buses. Club 
workers, who have assisted since the in- 
auguration of the idea in 1926, aided in the 
distribution of the presents. 



IVarners Seeking 
Reaction to Talent 

In picking future star talent, Warner 
Bros, is asking exhibitors to co-operate by 
getting the reactions of the picture-going 
public to the players whom Warners are 
grooming for starring roles. The company 
has selected 11 featured players whom they 
will eventually star. These are Ruby 
Keeler, Glenda Farrell, Harold Huber, 
Aline MacMahon, Lyle Talbot, Preston S. 
Foster, Claire Dodd, Frank McHugh, Dick 
Powell, Allen Jenkins and Patricia Ellis. 

Bondholder Sues, Clainning 
Chase Violated Trust 

Chase National Bank, as trustee for the 
20-year sinking fund bond issue of Para- 
mount, is alleged to have violated its trust 
in failing to protect bondholders, according 
to a suit filed last week in federal court in 
New York, in which L. F. Harris, executor 
of the estate of Ida C. Harris, asked that a 
receiver in equity be substituted for Chase. 
Harris said that $5,000 of the bonds are 
owned by the interests which he represents. 

Roxy Operated On After 
Radio City Theatres' Debut 

S. L. (Roxy) Rothafel, director general 
of the RKO Radio City theatres, the RKO 
Roxy and the Music Hall, was operated 
on last Saturday at Post Graduate Hospital, 
New York. Doctors described the opera- 
tion as minor, and associates declared he 
would leave the hospital this week. He will 
convalesce at his home in the city. 

Wanger Joins MGM; Will 
Produce Eight Films Yearly 

Walter Wanger, who resigned as vice- 
president of Columbia Pictures recently, will 
join MGM at the end of this month. Mr. 
Wanger has concluded a contract whereby 
he will produce eight pictures a year. The 
definite announcement of the MGM con- 
tract supplants reports that he would join 
RKO Radio. 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



13 



lllillllli 



THE CAHECA CED€CT$ 




AT OPENING OF RKO ROXY. Notables of the amusement world arriving for the 
inaugural performance of the motion picture theatre In Radio City: Will hiays, head 
of the MPPDA, and Mrs. hIays; Mrs. M. H. Aylesworth, Mrs. S. L. Rothafel, wife of 
"Roxy"; and M. hi. Aylesworth, president of RKO and NBC. 



BALLERINA. Another aspect of the 
RKO Roxy inaugural — Maria Gamba- 
relli, premier ballerina of this theatre, 
at which the dance is featured. 





CONTRACT RENEWED. Preston Fos- BARRYMORE FILM ON BROADWAY. Crowd in front of Astor theatre in New York as 

ter, whose contract Warner Brothers the hour neared for the premiere of "Rasputin and the Empress," MGM produc- 

has renewed, in recognition of his work tlon co-starring the three Barrymores — Ethel, John and Lionel — in which Ethel makes 

in "Ladles They Talk About." her screen debut. This photograph also shows a part of the huge sign. 



14 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 





KIDS KIDDING IT, TOO! Hollywood, we mean. 
Taking example from their elders. These young- 
sters are of Educational's Baby Burlesk group, 
shown ready for a scene in "Kid'in' Hollywood," 
with Arthur James Maskery as a director. 

ASSIGNED NEW ROLE. (Left) Tala BIrell, 
whom Universal brought from Vienna, where 
she was a prominent stage player. Her first 
important film part was in "Nagana," and now 
Universal has cast her in another, "Black Pearls." 




AT RKO ROXY OPENING. Ned E. Deplnet, vice- 
president in charge of distribution of RKO Radio 
Pictures, arriving with Mrs. Depinet. 




PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE NEW MANNER. Presumably following the methods 
of the system brought out in Paris (by which, if you want to photograph a prize 
fight, you "shoot" the gaping crowd), the camerartist thus recorded some 
stunt flying for First National's latest Richard Barthelmess picture, "Central Air- 
port," taking the pictures of Director William Wellman, Sally Eilers and the star. 



LEGAL MOTHER. Due process of law has given 
Lupe Velez the guardianship of Joan, her sister's 
youngest child, with whom the Fox player is here 
proudly pictured. Joan, who now of course is an 
American citizen, comes from Mexico. 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



15 




AT RKO ROXY OPENING. David Sarnoff, presi- 
dent of Radio City's dominant entity, the Radio 
Corporation of America, shown with Mrs. Sarnoff. 




STILL COUNTING BIRTHDAYS. Douglas Fair- 
banks, Jr., marks the arrival of his 25th year 
with the help of a cake sent by his wife, Joan 
Crawford, and of those making his new Warner 
picture, "Sucker." Director Mayo at his right. 

HIS LATEST CHARACTER. (Right) There are 
no feline restrictions on the lives of Jean Her- 
sholt, who has already far outnumbered the 
proverbial nine. Here he is In his characteriza- 
tion for MGM's Wallace Beery film, "Flesh." 






EMULATION. But whether James Cagney is 
mimicking his Sealyham pup, or vice versa, is the 
question. Or maybe both are doing a Joe E. 
Brown, with, of course, little success. Cagney's 
next Warner Brothers picture Is "Hard to Handle." 



COLOSSI. The technology of modern motion picture production Imposes few 
limitations In dimensions, linear or otherwise, and as a result more and more 
Is being done right on the lot, Instead of on location. Here is an example, in 
the set constructed for Unlversal's "Destination Unknown," incorporating a ship 
in ocean-going scale and requiring production equipment to match. 



16 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 




ASIDES & INTERLUDES 



By JAMES CUNNINGHAM 



Metro's Culver City studio has a special 
and highly diversified production cabinet 
composed of Sam Wood, comedy specialist; 
Howard Hawks, the realist; Sidney Frank- 
lin, the cosmopolitan; Edgar Selwyn, a mas- 
terly tear-jerker; Clarence Brown, very tact- 
ful with veterans like Marie Dressier, and 
Tod Browning, a connoisseur of the vicious. 
These men are "shock absorbers" for Irving 
Thalberg, production generalissimo. While 
the rest of the studio is munching in the 
noisy commissary, the cabinet sits down to 
luncheon with Mr. Thalberg in the "Execu- 
tive Bungalow," the White House of Culver 
City; a squatty hut with a Cecil B. DeMille 
dining room. It is in this room where the 
plans are laid for those famous Metro 
profits. Hunt Stromberg, who is described 
by the company as a "box office producer 
par excellence," is the only member of the 
council who, by contract, can work without 
Mr. Thalberg's approval. Others are Bernie 
Hyman and Bernie Fineman; Irish Eddie 
Mannix, Harry Rapf and Larry Weinger- 
ten, brother-in-law of Boss Thalberg. 
V 

Imagine Ophelia getting popped in the eye 
or being on the receiving end of a deft kick 
as she delivered her exit lines? Mr. James 
Cagney, the Imrd-hitting hero of Warners' 
heroines, arrived in New York the other morn- 
ing after stopping off at Kansas City just long 
enough to inform a few dozen autograph seek- 
ers assembled in Union Station that he would 
like to transfer his popping activities from the 
ordinary type of picture to something like Mr. 
Shakespeare's "Hamlet." 

V 

Ben Turpin's statement that prosperity 
will soon be here goes unchallenged. Ben 
should know. He can see around that cor- 
ner if anybody can. 

V 

In summing up motion picture events of the 
year just passed. Paramount says: "History 
may characterize 1932 as the year when Holly- 
wood learned about cooperation and efficiency." 
It took 30 vears. 

V 

Sally Filers and Ralph Bellamy had just 
completed a wedding scene on the Movietone 
lot when an extra, who had been the "minister" 
marrying the two, soberly confided that he was 
an ordained preacher and that the ceremony 
with witnesses, ring, et al, was legal. Ralph 
sputtered in confusion and Miss Filers thought 
of friend husband, Hoot Gibson. The "clergy- 
man" insisted that he was telling the truth and 
offered to prove his claim. The pair learned 
later that they were victims of one of director 
Hamilton MacFadden's practical jokes. Some 
fun. 

V 

Radio Pictures, for one, hopes to benefit 
by the return of beer. Taking issue with 
Carl Lammle, Universal president, who said 
recently that the sale of beer in saloons 
would be disastrous to the motion picture 
industry, B. B. Kahane, head of Radio, be- 
lieves that not only will the return of beer 
aid business in general, but its legalization 
would also have a stimulating effect on the 
motion picture industry. We doubt if 3.2 
per cent will stimulate anything. 

V 

We don't feel so badly now that we know 
that Demosthenes, the world's greatest orator, 
stuttered, and that Caesar and Napoleon, two 
great soldiers, had epileptic fits. Milton, one 
of the world's greatest poets, was blind, while 
Byron had a club foot and Shelley was prob- 
ably insane. Steinmetz, one of the world's 
greatest scientists, was dwarfed and deformed, 
and Beethoven, a musician of the finest, was 
deaf. 



KAT2 AWAY, 
MICKEY WON'T PLAY 

Sam Katz, on Wednesday, was re- 
ported about to take over the opera- 
tion of the old Seventh avenue Koxy. 
Mr. Katz was out, or away, or some- 
thing, but his office declared there 
"was nothing to it as yet." 

Howard S. Cullman, receiver for 
the theatre, and unfamiliar with film 
personalities, dismissed the reported 
deal with this: 

"I have never met Sam Katz — or 
even Louie Mouse." 

Mickey Mouse was busy in Walt 
Disney's inkpot and could not be 
reached for a statement. 



Jack Mulhall is currently playing his 33d 
consecutive week in vaudeville. This is an 
unusually long < engagement for a picture 
star, although it is not a record. Mr. Mul- 
hall has no illusions about it, explaining his 
success on the stage thusly: "The thing that 
brings people to the theatre to see a movie 
actor is the same thing that brings them to 
see a two-headed calf — curiosity." 

V 

Roberta Lee Estes is one of the youngest to 
appear on the Saenger theatre stage at New 
Orleans, or anywhere else. This few weeks old 
miss, daughter of Joe Estes, Saenger press 
agent, and Ballet Mistress Helen Strakova, 
was the star of a special ceremony, when, 
after a night's show last week, she was bap- 
tized on the stage. Hoiise Manager Robert 
Blair and his wife, the charming Lee, after 
whom the baby is named, were the godparents. 

Mr. Estes celebrated the occasion by launch- 
ing a series of teaser ads in newspapers 
on the admission change at the Saenger. Copy 
featured the nmn-erals "11-25^6-40," One 
htmch-huntitig negro played the numbers in a 
lottery and won $73. 

Enthusiastic Al Zimbalist, press agent 
for Warner theatres in northern New Jer- 
sey, has started a boosting movement. "The 
first thing to remember in this boosting 
campaign," said Zimbalist, "is that we never 
make a bad picture. . . . It's good or War- 
ner Brothers would never become associated 
with it!" 

V 

The Rivoli theatre at Two Rivers, Wis., 
frequently scatters four-line advertisements 
throughout the classified section of the town's 
newspaper. Free tickets are offered to per- 
sons whose names appear in the ads. Re- 
cently several of the ads mysteriously crept 
into the classification of "Funeral Directors." 
We hadn't realized that theatre business is 
quite as bad as the following would indicate : 



2 Funeral Directors 

GET THE RIVOLI HABIT. Always the best 
pictures. A free ticket awaits Walter Kappelman, 
1812 Monroe St.. at the Reporter office. 

WIEBUSCH & KLEIN 
Dependable Funeral Service 
Empire Bldg. Phone 9211 

YOU ARE ALWAYS ASSURED the best of enter- 
tainment at the Rivoli. A free ticket awaits 
R. Wall, 2302 Webester St.. at the Reporter office. 

BEDUHN & CtOETE MORTUARY 
Distinctive and unexcelled service. 
Phones: 395 - 5791 - 5792 



Charles E. Lewis, editor of our Man- 
agers' Round Table Club, was recuperating 
nicely from the flu until he learned that he 
had been appointed a colonel on the military 
staff of Governor Ruby Laffoon in Ken- 
tucky, where making moonshine and colonels 
are the favorite pastimes. After receiving 
the commission, wdth quite some surprise, 
Mr. Lewis was probably struck with the 
idea that generals should never die in bed. 
He immediately jumped to his feet with a 
click o' the heels and a smart salute to the 
pretty nurse and proceeded to get ready to 
come back to work. But "Chick" is not used 
to army life — he suffered a relapse and had 
to go back to bed. 

V 

The authorities of Baratonga. one of the 
Cook Islands in the South Pacific, have barred 
from further showing "Robinson Crusoe," in 
which the sprightly Douglas Fairbanks leaps 
from tree to tree. It was too exciting for the 
natives. Many of them tried to do some of 
Mr. Fairbanks' primitive stunts and got into 
trouble. Watit till they see Paramount's 
"Panther Woman." 

V 

Paramount's recent deal with Theodore 
(Facts of Life) Dreiser for rights to another 
story brings to mind Mr. Dreiser's holy zeal in 
upbraiding Paramount for "ruining" his "Amer- 
ican Tragedy" ; his subsequent lofty attacks on 
the art through articles which he sold to 5 and 
10 cent store magazines, and his general point- 
ing of the finger of scorn in the direction of 
southern California. Now it seems that Mr. 
Dreiser was only fooling. He has permitted 
another of his brain children to run the risk 
of being mangled by the same people — for a 
price. But authors are not supposed to be com- 
mercial. Or, quoting John G. Moffit, Kansas 
City critic, has the exploitation department 
something to do with the situation? 

V 

David Wark Griffith, a director of long 
' standing in the cinema, has gone commercial. 
The radio microphone has lured him away from 
the director's megaphone with offers of pots 
of gold. Beginning January 4, Mr. Griffith 
will broadcast twice weekly for Lehn and 
Fink's "Honey and Almond" cream. He will be 
the guiding spirit in an ether presentation of 
dramatic episodes of his life as a motion pic- 
ture producer. These zmll be related while 
the station announcer intermittently explains 
how best to remove all wrinkles and smooth 
the face; close large pores and improve the 
race. 

V 

While driving through Bronxville, a large 
Lincoln car flew out of the hands of Lewis 
H. Innerarity, a motion picture attorney, 
and came to rest on all four wheels in the 
Bronx river at Road Bridge. Mr. Innerarity 
was but slightly injured and was expected to 
leave the hospital Wednesday. 

V 

Merian C. Cooper, famed adventurer and 
motion picture producer, sent out a director, 
some cameramen and helpers in a whaling boat 
to shoot preliminary sequences for a new pic- 
ture. The entire boatload came back to Los 
Angeles without any film. After several hours 
out they were blown to sea too far to be com- 
fortable. Next they were raided by a coast- 
guard cutter which thought them rum-runners. 
They searched for hours for a whale, and 
finally, when they did find one, an overgrown 
aquatic mamal if there ever was one, it play- 
fully waved its tail once, struck the side of 
the boat and disabled it to such an extent that 
they had to turn on the pumps and sail for 
shore in a hurry. 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



17 



MOTION PICTURE STOCKS IN 1932 



by THE ANALYST 



High and Low in Stock and Bond Trading for Four Years 

(All Quotations In 1932 Are as of December 31) 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 



1932 



Stock & Dividends Sales High Date 

American Seating- 14,500 3ii Sept. 12 

♦Columbia Pictures, vtc 64,200 14% Aug. 27 

Consolidated Film 47,900 SVs Jan. 11 

Consolidated Film (pfd) 109,672 11}4 Mar. 7 

Eastman Kodak (3) 1,505,448 S7% Jan. 21 

Eastman Kodak Pfd. (6) 2,415 125 Oct. 18 

Fox Film A 401,100 5% Aug. 27 

General Theatre Equip 119,400 VA Jan. 11 

Keith-Albee-Orpheum Pfd 3,500 30 Sept. 29 

Loew's, Inc. (3) 1,570,825 37Ji Sept. 9 

Loew's, Inc. Pfd. (6.50) 23,780 80 Sept. 8 

M-G-M- Pfd. (1.89) 12,700 2254 Jan. 14 

Orpheum Circuit Pfd 8,020 15 Sept. 9 

Paramount -Publix 3,336,203 U9i Jan. 14 

Pathe Exchange 125,300 154 Aug. 29 

Pathe Exchange A 143,900 5^4 Feb. 17 

Radio-Keith-Orpheum (New) .... 378,450 7% Sept. 9 

Universal Pictures, 1st Pfd. A... 4,520 50 Jan. 27 

Warner Bros 1,501.599 414 Sept. 9 

Warner Bros. Pfd 8,330 20 Feb. 1 

♦Columbia moved from Curb to Stock Exchange, 
(x) Removed from Listing. 



Low 

J4 
454 
1 

2^4 
3554 
104J4 
1 

7 

1354 

39 

14 
354 
154 
54 
154 

IVz 

1054 
54 

4 









Net 


1931 




1930 




1929 




Date 


Lcist 


Chani^e 


High 


Low 


High 


Low 


High 


Low 


June 


20 


m 


- v>. 


9 




2654 


5 


4VA 


17 


May 


9 


954 


+ 6% 


22 




54^ 


14 






June 


1 


l'-4 


— 2V2 


15 




275^ 


m 


'25Vs 


"io 


June 


14 


65^ 


- 3ii 


18?^ 


754 


2854 


1254 


30% 


1554 


July 


8 


5444 


-27% 


18554 


77 


25554 


14254 


26434 


150 


June 


30 


119 


+ 7 














July 


8 




- 54 


'38k 


"254 


'37k 


"16% 


iosii 


"i95l 


May 


31 


(X) 


(x) 


1554 


V2 


10 


554 






May 


24 


20 


— 8 














May 


31 


1954 


— T7^ 


'63k 


"im 


'9554 


im 


'8454 


"32 


July 


7 


58 


■ 754 


98 


56 


112^ 


855^ 


11054 


80 


June 


9 


17% 


- 15^8 


27 


1^ 


2654 


23 


27 


2154 


June 


16 


SVi 


+ 'A 


75 




997^ 


60 


9554 


505^8 


May 


28 


2 


— 5 


5054 


5V2 


7754 


34^4 


7554 


35 


May 


4 


54 


Unch. 


m 


54 


9 


1'4 


147^ 


254 


June 


1 


154 


Unch. 


SH 


VA 


19^ 


2A 


30 


454 


June 


1 




+ 54 


4 


3 










Dec 


21 


11 


—27 


5754 


24 


'so 




'467^ 


'12 


June 


2 


1% 


- 54 


205^ 


25^ 


mi 


954 


6454 


30 


June 


2 


65^ 


- 3% 


4054 


854 


70'A 


31 


5954 


25^ 



Stocks & Dividends Sales 

Columbia Pictures (coram.) 6,400 

Educational Pictures Pfd 425 

General Theatre Equip. Co. Pfd. 64,800 

Nat'l Screen Service (1) 2,900 

Sentry Safety Control 44,600 

Technicolor 103,180 

Trans-Lux Dbs 105,700 

Universal Pictures 7,100 



CURB EXCHANGE 



1932 

A 














Net 


High 


Date 


Low 


' Date 


Last 


Change 


15 


Aug. 29 


454 


May 


27 


9Vs 


+654 


22 


Sept. 20 


8 


Feb. 


JS 


22 


+m 




Jan. 14 


'A 


June 


20 


A 


- 54 


18 


Jan. 14 


1054 


July 


1 


1054 


—5 


1 


Jan. 2 




July 


1 


3/16 


—13/16 


554 


Aug. 29 




May 


26t 


27/i 


+1 


354 


Sept. 8 


54 


June 


2 


1% 


Unch. 


6 


Sept. 20 


1 


July 


21 


254 


-154 



1931 




1930 




1929 




High 


Low 


High 


Low 


High 


Low 


23 


3Vs 


557^ 




3854 


12 


42 


13^ 


30 


12 


9754 


11 


3154 


5* 


3754 


2254 




24 


1554 


32?4 


1254 


3554 


'6 


354 


54 


9% 


54 


2854 


3'A 




m 


8654 


554 






1354 




1354 


45^ 


24 


"3 



BONDS ON STOCK EXCHANGE 



Bond & Maturity Sales 

General Theatre Equip. (6s '40).. 2,932,000 
General Theatre Equip. (6s '40 

ctfs.) 285,000 

Keith (6s '46) 864,000 

Loew's, Inc. (6s '41) 1,675,000 

Paramount-Broadway (554s '51).. 955,000 

Paramount, F. L. (6s '47) 2,095,000 

Paramount- Publix (554s '50) 2,893,000 

Pathe (7s '37 w.w.) 581,000 

Warner Bros. (cv. 6s '39) 5,428,000 







1932 






















































Net 


1931 




1930 




1929 




High 


Date 


Low 


Date 


Last 


Change 


High 


Low 


High 


Low 


High 


Low 


754 


Jan. 15 


1 


Mar. 16 


154 


- 154 


24 


2 


10054 


505^ 






6 


Sept. 26 


1 


June 20 


VA 


unchecked 














63 


Feb. 20 


24 


May 25 


3054 


+ 954 


7854 


35 


91 


74 


97 


7454 


9054 


Mar. 10 


64 


May 31 


8054 


+ 454 


9954 


70 


130 


100 


124 


96 


82 


Jan. IS 


34 


June 28 


37 


—33 


105 


65 


10354 


99 


103 


97 


60H 


Mar. 10 


1254 


Dec. 23 


1454 


—32 


97 


40 


10354 


89 


10054 


9154 


55 


Mar. 10 


1054 


July 1 


135i 


—26^ 


89 


33 


947^ 


76 






8054 


Feb. 19 


49 


July 11 


68 


+ 9 


96 


5054 


80 


36 


84 


2954 


40 


Jan. 14 


954 


June 2 


19 


- 754 


7454 


25 


11354 


60 







V V V 



Comparison of Valuations of Stock Issues, 1931-1932 



Approx. Shares 

Stock Issue Outstanding 

American Seating 203,000 

Columbia Pic. vtc 145.000 

Consolidated Film 530,000 

Consolidated Film pfd 400,000 

Eastman Kodak 2,500,000 

Eastman Kodak pfd 60,000 

Fox Film A 2,500,000 

Keith-A-O pfd 60,000 

Loew's, Inc 1,500,000 

Loew's, Inc., pfd 150,000 

Metro-G-M, pfd 600,000 

Orpheum Circuit pfd 63,(X)0 

Paramount 3,200,000 

Pathe Exchange 1,000,000 

Pathe Exchange A 230,000 

RKO 2,500,000 

Universal Pic. pfd 20,000 

Warner Brothers 3,900,000 

Warner Brothers pfd 103,000 

TOTAL VALUATIONS 



Close 




Close 










1931 


Vzduation 


1932 


Valuation 


^ Net 


Change ^ 


154 


$355,250 


IVs 


$329,875 


- 54 




$25,375 


35i 


453,125 


954 


1,341,250 


+ 654 


+ 


888,125 


4 


2,120,000 


154 


795,000 


— 254 




1,325,000 


954 


3,800,000 


65^ 


2,450,000 


- 354 




1,350,000 


8254 


205,312,500 


54^ 


136,875,000 


-2754 




68,437,500 


112 


6,720,000 


119 


7,140,000 


+ 7 


+ 


420.000 


254 


6,562,500 


VA 


4,687,500 


- 54 




1,875,000 


12 


720,000 


20 


1,200,000 


+ 8 


+ 


480,000 


2754 


40,687,500 


1954 


28,875,000 


— 7^ 




11,812,500 


6554 


9,825,000 


58 


8,700,000 


- 754 




1,125,000 


19 


11,400,000 


177^ 


10,725,000 


— 154 




675,000 


554 


330,750 


554 


362,250 


+ 54 


+ 


31,500 


7 


22,400,000 


2 


6,400,000 


— 5 




16,000,000 


54 


500,000 


54 


500,000 








1% 


437,500 


154 


437,500 








27A 


7,187,500 


354 


8,437,500 


, +"54 


+ 


1,250,000 


38 


760,000 


11 


220,000 


—27 




540,000 


254 


9,750,000 


154 


6,825,000 


- 54 




2,925,000 


10 


1.030,000 


6A 


630,875 


- 37A 




399,125 




$330,351,625 




$226,931,750 


—$103,419,875 



18 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



SEVEN FROM THE STUDIO travelers... 



Nothing Startling in Holidays' 
Outgiving, Says Meehan, btit 
Good Average Entertainment 

by LEO MEEHAN 

Hollywood Staff Correspondent 



James Cagney will soon be back in the 
marquee lights. His first picture since he 
patched up his salary rumpus with War- 
ners is "Hard to Handle," but it won't be. 
It is a rapid fire comedy drama, with the 
accent on the comedy, in which Cagney 
plays the role of a press agent and pro- 
moter. The picture packs plenty of wallop 
and is full of laughs. Ruth Donnelly, 
whom you may remember as the girl who 
played Lee Tracy's secretary in "Blessed 
Event," proves a sensation as a comedienne. 
She comes pretty near stealing the show, 
and looks like a coming comedy bet after 
this one. 

Warners also previewed another during 
the week, "Ladies They Talk About." It is 
an itimate revelation of the life of women 
in prison, and is based upon a story by 
Dorothy Mackaye, the little actress who 
served time not so long ago in California's 
famous San Quentin prison. It features 
Barbara Stanwyck and Preston Foster. A 
grim setting, of course, and it's restricted 
as to locale. The comedy sometimes gets 
pretty rough. 

' "Wax Museum" a "Shocker" 

Just to show that they are busy, War- 
ners also finished up "Wax Museum" and 
sent it on its way, too. It belongs in the 
shocker class, for those who favor goose 
pimple entertainment. Much of the action 
is laid in a wax figure museum, providing 
fine opportunities for creepy stuff. Color 
photography enhances the values as it did 
in the case of "Doctor X." It made quite 
an impression at the preview. 

Ralph Ince has pounded out a punchy 
yarn for RKO Radio called "Lucky 
Devils." It is all about the life and work 
of the studio stunt men, the fellows who 
gamble their lives to provide your audiences 
with thrills. There's good inside film stuff, 
with plenty of thrills and melodrama in- 
cluded. Bill Boyd plays the lead. 

"Second Hand Wife" falls in the class of 
family entertainment. It is a faithful screen 
adaptation of a Kathleen Norris story, and, 
as you probably know, Mrs. Norris is one 
of the most popular authors of this genera- 
tion. Hamilton MacFadden adapted and 
directed it for Fox, and it features Sally 
Filers and Ralph Bellamy. The story 
should be particularly interesting to women. 
The second hand wife is the office secretary 
who is married to her boss when love grows 
cold at home and his wife divorces him. 
There's lots of dialogue, and a minimum of 
action, but the story is interesting, with 
good suspense, wholesome treatment. 

Armstrong in Fine Role 

Charles R. Rogers has finished his third 
picture for Paramount, "The Billion Dollar 
Scandal." We doubt if there is that much 
money in the world, but it is based upon the 
famous oil scandals of the Harding admin- 
istration days, not a new subject by any 



means. Nevertheless, some very real char- 
acters and a vivid treatment of the subject 
make it an entertaining film. Robert Arm- 
strong does probably the best role he ever 
has played on the screen. 

Paramount has a gay, colorful picture in 
"Tonight Is Ours," one of those mythical 
kingdom stories, beautifully done with a 
swell cast headed by Claudette Colbert, 
Fredric March, Alison Skipworth. The ro- 
mance is delightful, and it is the romantic 
theme that has been stressed. Costumes, 
court balls and all that sort of thing make a 
grand appeal to the eye. It's one of the 
kind that makes you settle back in the seat 
and enjoy it all, because you don't have to 
believe there is anything really true about 
the story. 

Nothing sensational has developed in any 
of the pictures previewed during the holiday 
season, but on the whole they stack up as 
good average entertainment. 

Stories to Set 
Majestic Costs 

Phil Goldstone, treasurer of Majestic Pic- 
tures and producer of its features, gained 
the approval of the company board of direc- 
tors at a meeting in New York last week, 
for a plan of production which eliminates 
the budgeting of series of pictures. It is 
the contention of Mr. Goldstone that a se- 
ries of features should not be budgeted ; that 
the requirements of each individual story 
should be the sole governing factor in es- 
tablishing its cost of production. 

Later discussing the idea, the producer 
pointed out as a common fallacy the setting 
of a definite production cost for each of a 
series. He believes that many stories might 
result in excellent pictures at a cost of $75,- 
000 while others might require the expendi- 
ture of many times that amount. 

Herman Gluckman, president of Majestic 
Pictures, has inaugurated regular weekly 
conferences of the executive committee. The 
committee includes Mr. Gluckman, William 
Shapiro of Boston, Tony Luchesse, Phila- 
delphia; Joseph Simmonds, Tower Pictures, 
all franchise holders. 



Opens New American Display 
Offices In Midwest Cities 

Charles L. Casanave, Midwest franchise 
holder of American Display Corporation, 
who recently opened an office in Cleveland 
as the first of a group in 14 states, has ap- 
pointed Cecil B. Mayberry as manager of 
the Chicago office and Clay E. Brehm as 
manager in Cincinnati. 

Since opening the Cleveland office two 
weeks under the management of Lew 
Thompson, 61 accounts in this territory 
have been contracted, it is reported. 



Frank Mastroly, personal representative of 
Carl Laemmle, arrived in New York from 
Hollywood. 

Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., and Mrs. Fair- 
banks are planning a trip to Europe this 
spring. 

Jules Girden, Warner theatre executive, is on 
a business trip to Pittsburgh. 

Lillian Harvey, player, was due in Holly- 
wood from New York. 

Ruth Waterbury, editor of Movie Mirror, 
arrived in Hollywood from New York. 

Cecil B. DbMille was due in Hollywood from 
New York. 

Sidney R. Kent, Fox president, is scheduled to 
leave New York for the coast Friday. 

Pat Casey arrived in Hollywood from New 
York. 

Claudette Colbert, player, was due in New 
York from Hollywood on a three or four 
weeks' vacation. 

Richard Barthelmess, player, is planning a 
South American trip. 

Arthur Dent, general manager of B. I. P., 
returned to London. 

Harold B. Franklin, in charge of RKO the- 
atres, arrived in New York from Hollywood. 

Heather Angel, player, arrived from Europe 
and left for the Fox studios. 

J. V. Ritchey, of Ritchey Export Corporation, 
sailed for London. 

Ben Y. Cam mack, Atlanta manager for Uni- 
versal, is in New York. 

Bartlett Cormack, associate producer for Ra- 
dio, arrived in New York from Hollywood. 

Sigmund Spaeth, music critic, and Mrs. 
Spaeth ; Charles B. Paine, Universal 
treasurer, and Mrs. Paine; William Row- 
land, producer, arrived in New York fol- 
lowing a trip to Bermuda. 

Greta Garbo will return to the United States 
early in January. 

George Raft, player, returned to Hollywood 
from New York. 

Louis Weitzenkorn, writer, on RKO-Radio 
staff, was due in New York from Hollywood. 

Chick Chandler, RKO-Radio player, arrived 
in Hollywood from New York. 

Joseph Stransky, orchestra conductor; Ed- 
ward Everett Horton, player, and Fritz 
Kreisler arrived from Europe. 

Rex Dunn, former Warner musical director, 
arrived in New York from California. 

N. Brewster Morse, writer, was due in Holly- 
wood from New York. 

Robert McIntyre, casting director for Gold- 
wyn, is due in New York from Hollywood. 

Arthur Loew arrived from Europe. 

Bill Raynor, New England district manager 
for RKO, is in New York. 

Chicago SMPE Meets; 
Spring Session April 24 

The January meeting of the Chicago 
Section of the Society of Motion Picture 
Engineers was scheduled for Thursday, 
January 5, at the Electric Association, 
Civic Opera Building, Chicago. A dinner 
is scheduled to precede the meeting, during 
which R. Fawn Mitchell was to read the 
preliminary report of the committee on 
laboratory practices. 

The regular semi-annual spring meeting 
of the SMPE will be held at the Pennsyl- 
vania Hotel, New York, April 24 to 28, 
it has been decided by the board of gover- 
nors. The semi-annual banquet is planned 
for the Wednesday night of the session. 
O. M. Glunt, chairman of the papers com- 
mittee, has begun preparation of the pro- 
gram. W. C. Kunzman, Cleveland, chair- 
man of the convention committee, has ap- 
pointed Herbert Griffin, International Pro- 
jector Company, as chairman of the local 
arrangements committee. 



HER STOCK 
IS GOING 




In "Six Hours to Live" she com- 
pelled the breathless attention of 
audiences and evoked the praise of 
critics. Her distinctive beauty gave 
fans another thrill in ''Sherlock 
Holmes." And she'll delight them 
again in her new, saucy, naughty 
role. Add lustre to your marquee 
by billing her big in her . . . 





Laughter 



From Eric Noel's novel 
Directed by 

FRANK TUTTLE 
It's a FOX Picture 



When the 
ladies see her 
CLOTHES... 

they'll have something 
to talk about for weeks. 
Daring, stunning designs 
that every woman dreams 
about. An eye-ful for the 
men-folk, too! 





Love and Lots of 



The sprightly tale of a smooth, light-fingered 
gentleman . . . who finds it difficult to get larceny 
out of his system. ..captures an enticing blonde 
sleuth . . . imprisons her on his cozy yacht for a 
cruise in dreamy, moon- kissed waters . . . and is 
captivated by his captive. Fanettes will wish 
they were aboard to share the fun. 




B AXT E R 



MIRIAM 



JORDAN 

Herbert Mundin 



22 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



2,000-FOOT 



REEL SEEN AS ECONOMY 



POSSIBLE ANNUAL SAVINGS TO STUDIOS IN COST OF "LEADER" ALONE 
BECAUSE OF FEWER REELS NEEDED 

(Cosf of processed leader estimated as 1.7 cents per foot) 



(Continued from page 9) 
paratus in use in the New York release print 
laboratories be investigated. 

c. That a subcommittee be appointed to deter- 
mine the present value of screen illumination in 
the review rooms and projection theatres in 
the studios and Hollywood laboratories. 

Action of Council 

The recommendations of the committee were 
approved and the committee authorized to con- 
tinue with the investigations outlined. 

STANDARDIZATION OF 
FORMAT OF SCRIPTS 

Problem 

Since the introduction of sound, there has 
been no generally recognized format of scripts. 
As a result, the placement, order, numbering 
and display of the various parts — dialogue, ac- 
tion, set descriptions, camera instructions, etc., 
vary widely among the studios and are con- 
stantly subject to change. This unnecessarily 
complicates the work of those who handle the 
scripts during production. 

(Report by Carey Wilson, Writers Branch.) 

Proposed 

To conduct such surveys as may be neces- 
sary to establish the basis for the various pres- 
ent practices. To correlate this information and 
secure general agreement on a recommended 
form of script that will be most legible, graphic, 
and convenient in practical use by actors, di- 
rectors, writers, executives and the various pro- 
duction departments. 

INVESTIGATION OF 
FILM PRESERVATIVES 
Problem 

A number of compounds are on the market 
which manufacturers claim will lengthen the 
life of release prints, increase film pliability, 
protect the surface from oil and scratches, re- 
duce buckling and. warping, and make the film 
self-lubricating. Studios and laboratories have 
tried these preparations from time to time and 
found both advantages and disadvantages. 

Committee 

C. Roy Hunter, Chairman; Fred Gage, A. J. 
Guerin. 

Objectives 

To test the claims for the principal prepara- 
tions under practical conditions of use with 
high intensity projection lamps, etc., and make 
recommendations for the information of the 
studios on the basis of efficiency in relation 
to cost. 

Digest of Committee Report 

Since the last meeting of the council, the com- 
mittee has conducted a survey of compounds 
offered to the studios, and has thoroughly in- 
vestigated and tested more than 20 "coating," 
"fuming" and "formalin glycerine hardening" 
methods. Questionnaires returned from lead- 
ing laboratories have also disclosed that in- 
dependent investigations of many so called 
"processing systems" have been conducted, that 
these processes have been found impractical, 
and that the bulk of all release film is now 
treated by the cold wax method. The com- 
mittee reported as its finding that cold wax- 
ing, when properly done, is the most practical, 
economical, and satisfactory method. 

Action of Council 

Due to the absence of Mr. Hunter on account 
of sickness, the Council voted to table the re- 
port of the committee for further considera- 
tion at the next meeting, authorizing that in 
the meantime the committee may continue in- 
vestigation at its discretion. 



Number 

Studio Features 

Fox 43 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 50 

Paramount 66 

RKO Radio 60 

Universal 33 

Warners-First National 60 



TOTAL 312 



Industry Seeks to 
HaltReelDouhling 

In the ten-plank program for standardiz- 
ing certain technical practices, as advocated 
by the Research Council of the Academy, the 
question of most concern to all branches of 
the industry is that of the proposed stand- 
ardization of film reels from the present 
length of 1,000 to 2,000 feet. The Academy 
made the following announcement : 

When the Academy "Standard Release Print 
Make-up" was put into effect November 1, 1930, 
no specification was included as to the length of 
the reel. The Standard Release Print proved 
tc» be correct from an engineering standpoint, 
it made perfect change-overs possible without 
rehearsal when it was maintained and used and 
it did bring uniformity in leader make-up among 
all companies in the business. However, as the 
amount of sound-on-film increased, projection- 
ists grew careless about keeping the prints up 
to exact length. Many reels of less than 500 
feet were distributed because of editorial diffi- 
culties. First class theatres adopted the prac- 
tice of splicing two reels together in order to 
give smoother change-overs. Other theatres 
followed the practice because the projection- 
ists thought it gave a better show or because 
the longer reels made their work easier. 

In addition, more and more theatres cut down 
to one projectionist. It is not quite but almost 
a physical impossibihty for one projectionist 
to run a smooth sound show and keep the reels 
■in the lengths they come from exchanges. 

As a result of all these circumstances, the 
exchanges, the theatre circuits, the unions and 
the producing companies have all been com- 
pletely unable to stop doubling, although they 
have all tried and some companies have spent 
tens of thousands of dollars fighting the prac- 
tice before giving up. 

At present, the studios are cutting, printing 
and distributing reels of an average length of 
about 850 feet. Each reel has a standard leader. 
When these prints get to the theatres, the pro- 
jectionist puts reels one and two together, three 
and four and so on. Before he returns the 
print to the exchange he is supposed to put 
the leaders back on again, cutting of? _ more 
frames in the process. Directly or indirectly 
the theatres pay him for the time he takes to 
mount and separate these reels. The exchange 
then either makes some attempt to maintain 
the print with replacements or just checks the 
splices and sends it on to another theatre where 
the process is repeated. 

The subcommittee of the Research Council 
now proposes that the industry make serious 
investigation of the possibility of releasing all 



Reels 


Leader 


Estimated 


Savings 


Saved 


Per Reel 


No. Prints 


Per Year 


144 


30 


175 


$12,900 


170 


36 


231 


23,000 


218 


28 


200 


18,840 


174 


30 


ISO 


13,540 


102 


30 


175 


7,491 


218 


30 


200 


20,200 


1,026 






$95,971 



features on larger reels. The size proposed is 
13^ inches in diameter with a four-inch hub. 
This reel will carry a maximum of 1,700 feet 
but in actual practice the reels as released 
will average a little less than 1,500 feet just 
the same as now with a maximum of 1,000 feet 
they average a little less than 850 feet per reel. 

Distribution on 13^-inch reels would, it is 
said, effectively and positively stop doubling of 
features. Projectionists would not attempt to 
put 3,000 feet and upwards in the projectors 
and would not have any justification for doing 
so. 

The subcommittee believes that the annual 
savings will repay the costs of the changes in 
equipment in a comparatively short time and 
that a longer reel length would represent a 
big economy to the industry. 

As studio operations are carried on in short 
lengths, the longer release reel would have 
virtually no effect of any kind during produc- 
tion. A reel of about 1,700 feet would be of 
great advantage in cutting. At present, more 
features are released in eight reels than any 
other length. The proportion is about five eight- 
reel features to four of seven reels, three of 
nine reels and one each of six and ten reels. 
This estimate is based on a survey of the last 
20 releases from the six largest studios. 

The effect of a 1,700-foot reel would be to 
not quite cut the number of reels on half. In 
general, features now requiring eight rieels 
would require four on the new length and so 
on. This would mean that the cutters would 
have to find three and four change-overs per 
feature instead of six, seven or eight, as at 
present. In addition, they would have an av- 
erage of well over 200 feet leeway in which to 
find change-over points in comparison with 
something like 100 feet average leeway per reel 
as at present. 

In the laboratories a longer reel would cause 
no difficulties that could not be overcome by 
minor changes in manufacturing methods. 

In the exchanges, the principal cost would be 
the cost of buying a large number of shipping 
cases. 

In the theatres the longer reels should logi- 
cally receive a welcome since projectionists have 
been insisting on doubling up. AH Simplex, 
Powers and other standard makes of projec- 
tors will carry the 13^ -inch reel. There m,ay 
be some few projectors still in use that will 
not ; the data on this are now being collected. 
Povver re-winds, storage racks and other pro- 
jection room equipment are either already suit- 
able or would require only minor changes. 

Disc release and foreign releases are two 
other important factors that will have to be 
taken into account. While there are very few 
exclusively disc accounts left, several of the 
companies still provide for them. Either these 
theatres would have to be converted to use 
movietone prints or records would have to be 
made of such pitch and size that they could 
play against the longer length of film. 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



23 



§HOWMEN*$ REVIEWS 



lllll 



This department deals with new product 
from the point of view of the exhibitor 
who is to purvey it to his own public 



Tonight Is Ours 

(Paramount) 
Musical Romance 

In story this is the kind of picture that used to 
delight the fans before the screen became audi- 
ble — romance, gay and charming, built along 
story book lines, with everything happening just 
as expected and hoped. Accompanied by a 
catchy musical background, the show majors in 
love interest, which while always predominant 
is so constructed that there is logical oppor- 
tunity for working out the accompanying dra- 
matic suspense in a logical manner. The pic- 
ture, elaborately staged and beautifully mounted, 
has its locales in Paris and the capital of a 
mythical European kingdom. 

At a grand masque ball, Nadya (a princess 
incognito) and Sabien meet a,nd fall in love. 
Their romance comes to the point of matrimony, 
when an ambassador from her country informs 
her that she must return and become the queen. 
Heart-broken Nadya dares not meet Sabien 
again, leaving him only a note. 

At home, her country seethes with unrest. A 
diplomatic marriage is arranged. It appeals 
neither to the Queen nor to Prince Keri. At 
the railroad station to which she has gone to 
meet her bridegroom, an attempted assassina- 
tion is foiled by Sabien, who could not resist 
the lure of seeing his loved one again. Not 
knowing who her savior is, Nadya consents to 
meet him. The meeting is both sweet and 
tragic, but the old love is kindled again, and 
Sabien returns to the palace to make good the 
title of the picture. 

During their happy time together, the popu- 
lace of the kingdom is in a turmoil. Krish is 
apprehensive. The mob swarm into the palace, 
demonstrate they love their queen and demand 
that she dispose of her old advisors and call off 
the international wedding. Granting their de- 
mands in return for one of her own — ^that she 
may marry Sabien, the "commoner" — everything 
is happy. 

At first glance "Tonight Is Ours" may ap- 
pear to be exclusively a woman's picture. It is 
full of love charm that will stimulate the imagi- 
nation of every feminine heart who loves to 
day dream, yet it has so much clever entertain- 
ment that it should have more than usual inter- 
est for the men folk. While in some spots the 
dialogue is a bit too lengthy, it is loaded with 
lines that will make alluring ad copy. Fredric 
March offers his usual high class performance 
and Claudette Colbert is more pleasing and ef- 
fective than in any of her more recent pictures. 
The remainder of the cast is more than accept- 
able. Without becoming sickly sentimental, the 
show offers grand opportunities to construct a 
romantic campaign. Clever but not too rigid 
dignity should be the working basis. And the 
use of Noel Coward's name in all exploitation 
should help draw in some of the irregular pa- 
trons. — McCarthy. Hollywood. 

Produced and distributed by Paramount. Directed 
by Stuart Walker. From "The Queen Was in the 
Parlour" by Noel Coward. Screen play by Edwin 
Justus Mayer. Photographed by Karl Struss. Re- 
lease date, January 13, 1933. Running time, 76 min- 
utes. 

CAST 

Nadya Claudette Colbert 

Sabien Pastal Fredric March 

Grand Duchess Emilie Alison Skipworth 

Prince Keri Paul Cavanagh 

General Krish Arthur Byron 

Zana Ethel Griffies 

Seiminoff Clay Clement 



THE concept of this departmerri 
Is that the exhibitor is con- 
cerned not with any critic's idea 
of "hov/ good?" or "hov/ poor?" 
but rather with the question of pre- 
cisely what the product is and what 
is to be done with it when and as 
it is played. The exhibitor, in gen- 
eral, is concerned with the special 
aspects of strength and of weakness 
in the product, its appeals and short- 
comings, that he may adequately 
deal with it when he becomes its 
sponsor to his public. These "review" 
pages aim to aid the exhibitor as 
the retailer of the merchandise con- 
cerned.— THE EDITOR. 



Wax Museum 

(Warner) 
Drama 

Novel, though somewhat gruesome, "Wax 
Museum" nevertheless is a picture that con- 
tains plenty of entertainment that should appeal 
not only to the "horror" fans, but to the gen- 
eral rank and file of patrons as well. Use of 
Technicolor throughout, along the lines pre- 
viously affected by Warner in "Dr. X" serves 
to concentrate deeper interest on the thrilling 
and sometimes comic dialogue and action of 
the picture. 

Introduced in a sort of store-show, side- 
show atmosphere, the story presents Igor as 
the creator and exhibitor of wax figures. Busi- 
ness being poor, his partner, Joe Worth, sets 
fire to the exhibit in order to collect the insur- 
ance. Igor, trying to protect his treasures, is 
horribly disfigured by burns and made mad 
by his experience. This sequence lays the foun- 
dation for the later horror episodes. 

Years later, Igor opens the same kind of a 
museum in New York. Now quite mad, he 
makes his figures by a new process. Bodies 
are stolen from morgues and murder is com- 
mitted to enable Igor to make his process casts 
along the exact contour of human bodies. The 
museum is the center of great interest, but the 
murders and body stealings excite strange stories 
about Igor and his creations. A newspaper 
editor, who is always looking for sensational 
stories, assigns his sob sister, Florence, to find 
out what she can. Considerable spasmodic, 
modern comedy between this pair and romance 
is opened up between Charlotte and Burton, 
a young sculptor in the employ of Igor, 

A thrilling climax is reached as Igor attempts 
to murder Charlotte and transform her body 
into the model for a famous historical charac- 
ter. All the hullabaloo of police investigation 
and newspaper sensationalism is provided in 
the exposing and eliminating of the insane 
Igor. 

Even though "Max Museum" is a horror 
story, the elements of novelty that have been 
incorporated into its screen treatment give it 
a decidedly different tinge than is ordinarily 
expected in this type of picture. Its emotion — 



stirring and thrilling drama provide an un- 
usual appeal, and though the leading character 
is presented as, and understood to be a mad- 
man, whose idea of revenge is to make people 
pay for the original wrong that was inflicted 
upon him by Worth, the building of his charac- 
ter is such that mingled sympathy and fear are 
the ground work of the suspense. 

More than ordinary exploitation and bally- 
hood ideas are suggested both by the title and 
context of the story. It will be strictly in line 
to transform your outer lobby into a replica of 
a wax museum, while the thrill and horror 
color of the picture should suggest some start- 
ling advertising and publicity copy. 

Adults of both sexes will find more than 
enough in the way of startling excitement to 
interest them, but because of its gruesomeness, 
"Wax Museum" is a little too strong for juve- 
nile patronage. — McCarthy, Hollywood. 

Produced and distributed by Warner Brothers. 
Directed by Michael Curtiz. From the play by 
Charles S. Belden. Screen play by Don MuUaly and 
Carl Erickson. Photographed by Ray Rennahan. Re- 
lease date, February 18, 1933. Running time, 72 min- 
utes. 

CAST 

Ivan Igor Lionel Atwill 

Charlotte Duncan Fay Wray 

Florence Glenda Farrell 

Ralph Burton Allen Vincent 

The Editor Frank McHugh 

Harold Winton Gavin Gordon 

Joe Worth Edwin Maxwell 

Dr. Rasmussen Holmes Herbert 

Sparrow Arthur Edmund Holmes 

The Captain DeWitt Jennings 

Detective Thomas Jackson 

Hugo Matthew Betz 



The Half-Naked Truth 

(RKO Radio) 
Comedy-Drama 

Lee Tracy contrives in this film to place an- 
other feather in his already well-filled cap by 
a crackling performance in a glove-fitting role 
as the big exponent of the great god Ballyhoo. 
The story comes via a recent tale of the ex- 
ploits of the late famed press-agent of all press- 
agents, Harry Reichenbach, "Phantom Fame," 
and no opportunity has been lost in the screen 
adaptation to pack the picture with action plus. 

The pace is extremely rapid, and should 
carry the audience along with the humor and 
fast dialogue of the show business of the shaky 
country carnival and the almost equally shaky 
"big time" revues under the white lights of 
Broadway. 

Tracy is splendid, and the exhibitor can be 
sure he is well known to his audience through 
his previous performances. He gives all he has 
in a characterization of the ballyhoo man in 
the carnival whose fertile brain brings the 
money, and then brings him trouble. His pal 
is Eugene Pallette, carnival strong man, and 
his sweetheart is Lupe Velez, the carnival's 
oriental dancer. The three rush .out of trou- 
ble and to the big town, with nothing to fortify 
them but Tracy's colossal nerve. Working his 
publicity to perfection, Tracy spots her into the 
revue of Frank Morgan, before Morgan can 
get his second wind. When Miss Velez's fame 
goes to her head and Tracy gets the cold shoul- 
der, he proceeds, with the same spontaneous 
ingenuity, to dislodge Miss Velez from her 
pedestal and to substitute the hotel chamber 
maid, Shirley Chambers, as the leader of a 
"nudist" cult. She, also, he throws into Mor- 



Wild animal 

scenes that will 
curl your hair! 

Romance that 
will warm your 
heart I 

The last word in 
sensationalism I 



""iMH' 




The most breath-taking event 
the screen has dared to offer! 




26 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



gan's show and virtually into Morgan's arms. 
Pallette returns to the carnival, and, in trou- 
ble, calls for Tracy. The ballyhoo man suc- 
cumbs to the sawdust, and finds Miss Velez 
waiting for him. 

The names are good, led by Tracy and Miss 
Velez, and the performances excellent. The 
picture is fast, active and often highly amusing 
entertainment, but, above all, it is entertain- 
ment. Not very weighty, it has the sort of pep, 
vim and amusement, chiefly because of Tracy, 
which makes it really popular material. Ex- 
ploitation possibilities are, naturally, unlimited. 
The carnival atmosphere, the big time show, 
the Tracy personality, exploitation of publicity 
as it is handled by Tracy with nerve, nerve 
and more nerve, offers an unusual selling op- 
portunity. Promise light enjoyable comedy en- 
tertainment, with a bare touch of romance 
and a spot of drama, and indicate that the 
youngsters can see it as well as the oldsters. — 
Aaronson, New York. 

Produced and distributed by RKO Radio. Directed 
by Gregory LaCava. From an original story by Ben 
Markson and H. N. Swanson. Screen play by Bart- 
lett Cormack and Corey Ford. Cameraman, Bert 
Glennon. Sound recorder, John Tribby. Film edi- 
tor, C. L. Kimball. Release date, December 16, 1932. 
Running time, 77 minutes. 

CAST 

Teresita Lupe Velez 

Bates Lee Tracy 

Achilles Eugene Pallette 

Farrell Frank Morgan 

Colonel WiUikens Bob McKenzie 

Lou James Donlon 

Gladys Shirley Chambers 

The sheriff Charles Dow Clark 



Ladies They Talk About 

(Warner Bros.) 
Drama 

A strong straight-from-the-shoulder campaign, 
in which the leading cast names should pre- 
dominate, is essential. Molded somewhat along 
the atmospheric lines of "Ladies of the Big 
House," the show treats mainly of the hyes of 
women in jail. It stresses what they think of 
and do to while away the time ; presents an odd 
picture of the social structure of the women's 
prison community in sequences that offer a vivid 
insight into the characters of the inmates, and 
also gives "Aunt Maggie" an opportunity to 
inject much laugh-provoking, if somewhat off- 
color, comedy. 

Against this background of prison life is in- 
corporated a romance between Nan and David 
Slade. This is brought about when Nan is 
nabbed as the decoy in a bank robbery and 
Slade, a radio-broadcasting reformer, meets her 
in the district attorney's office and recognizes 
her as an old childhood sweetheart. His moral 
scruples prevent him from making a deal with 
the D. A., and as a result, Nan gets a two to 
five year stretch, for the better part of a year 
of which she spurns Slade's pleas to see her. 

During all this time, the picture is completely 
prison, but it veers sensationally when Don and 
Dutch also get a "rap" in San Quentin, and 
through the connivance of Lefty, Nan becomes 
a participant in the planned jail break. The 
attempt winds up in failure as the two convicts 
are killed in a tunnel that leads to Nan's cell. 
Her term extended, she plots revenge on Drake, 
now considered a stool pigeon, because she be- 
lieves that a letter she gave him on the occasion 
she permitted a meeting was turned over to the 
cops by him. 

Completing her sentence and returning to 
Los Angeles, she becomes one of the throng 
gathered at Slade's sort of male Aimee Semple 
MacPherson tabernacle, a gun concealed in her 
purse. In Slade's study, she takes a shot at 
him, but only wounds him. She finds she really 
loves her victim and he calms down the temple 
attaches and cops. 

The picture shows much evidence of effort 
to get the most out of a difficult subject. The 
theme, even in its most colorful moments, is 
quite grim and effective selling of the picture 
requires use of the jail atmosphere which occu- 
pies most of its comparatively short running 
time. It can be made into a woman's picture 
that will have an appeal for men by making 
the best uses of the rather intriguing title, sup- 



ported primarily by the cast names, followed 
up by interest-creating catch lines that let the 
public know it's a jail picture. Brighten this 
idea with a human interest line of copy that 
asks questions, such as : "What do they do — 
these forgotten women? What do they think 
about and dream and hope, these women behind 
grim walls who live and wish just as you wish, 
but with never a chance of realizing their 
wishes?" Judiciously handled, the idea of their 
isolation from society and the companionship 
of men might be just the angle to interest the 
male patronage but that depends upon how well 
you know your community. However, directing 
a campaign towards the feminine contingent 
should be productive of the best results. 

The picture is absolutely adult fare. It is 
far too stern in both action and dialogue for 
juvenile entertainment. — McCarthy, Holly- 
wood. 

Produced and distributed by Warner Brothers. Di- 
rected by Howard Bretherton and William Keighley. 
Based on a play by Dorothy Mackaye and Carlton 
Miles. Screen play by Brown Holmes, Wm. Mc- 
Grath and Sidney Sutherland. Photography by John 
Seitz. Art director, Esdras Hartley. Film editor, 
Basil Wrangel. Release date, February 4, 1933. Run- 
ning time, 64 minutes. 

CAST 

Nan Barbara Stanwyck 

David Slade Preston S. Foster 

Don Lyle Talbot 

Susie Dorothy Burgess 

Linda Lillian Roth 

Aunt Maggie Maude Ebume 

Lefty Harold Huber 

Noonan Ruth Donnelly 

The Warden Robert Warwick 

Miss Johnson Helen Ware 

Tracy DeWitt Jennings 

District Attorney Robert McWade 

Mrs. Arlington Cecil Cunningham 

Blondie • Helen Mann 

Marie Grace Cunard 

Mustard Mme. Sul-te-Wan 

Dutch Harold Healy 

Bank Guard Harry Gribbon 

Laughter in Hell 

(Universal) 
Drama 

Universal makes its contribution to the cur- 
rent chain gang motion pictures, adapting an 
original story of the rather well-known Jim 
Tully, pointing sharply to the chain gang penal 
system of a southern state, taking a measure 
of the sting out of the indictment by setting 
the story in the early years of the century. 

Little has been glossed over in attempting a 
graphic picture of conditions, methods. The 
picture becomes rather strong medicine for cer- 
tain audiences when four Negroes are seen 
taken from their box-like cells and hanged from 
the limb of a tree while the other convicts look 
on, and there are sharp picturizations of the 
flogging of other prisoners. 

The cast is reasonably good from a box office 
standpoint, and performs well. Pat O'Brien 
is in the lead, and is the victim of the chain 
gang. Merna Kennedy, Gloria Stuart, blondly 
attractive ; Berton Churchill, Tom Brown are 
the names which have selling possibilities on 
the marquee. The cast is long but much of it 
is unknown. 

A prologue sequence indicates the death of 
O'Brien's mother while he is a small boy, in 
a small southern town. He is under constant 
persecution from two Perkins brothers. The 
scene jumps to a period perhaps 10 years later, 
with O'Brien a railroad engineer. He marries 
Miss Kennedy, discovers that she is having an 
afTair with one of the Perkins brothers, played 
by Arthur Vinton, and kills his wife and her 
lover. A life sentence in the chain gang brings 
the story to its point of focus. Perkins' brother, 
played by Douglas Dumbrille, is warden at 
the prison camp and O'Brien suffers as 
imagined when that fact is known. Hangings, 
floggings are part of the imparted background. 
The prisoners are sent to dig graves in a neigh- 
boring town when yellow fever breaks out in 
a plague. There, at night, under fire of the 
guards' rifles, they kill the warden, and many 
escape. 

O'Brien comes upon the solitary Miss Stuart, 
orphaned by the plague, and the two make their 
way to safety and the film's happy ending. 

The picture is not, obviously, for juvenile 
consumption, but has a certain amount of 
strength for the adult audience. That audience, 



however, should be advised of the type of story 
it will see. That same indication gives oppor- 
tunity for exploitation of a strong character, 
based on the story's highlights as described. 
It would be well, perhaps, not to overdo the 
gruesomeness of certain of the chain gang 
methods and devices, for fear of alienating the 
feminine portion of the patronage, in particular. 
Heavy, the picture yet is entertaining in its 
own fashion, and should be made to do at least 
reasonably well at the box office. — Aaronson, 
New York. 

Produced and distributed by Universal. Directed by 
Edward L. Cahn. From the novel by Jim Tully. 
Screen play by Tom Reed. Dialogue direction by 
Russell Hcpton. Photographed by John Stumar. Re- 
lease date, January 12, 1933. Running titne, 68 min- 
utes. 

CAST 

Barney Slaney Pat O'Brien 

Barney Slaney (as a boy) Tom Conlon 

Marvbelle Evans Merna Kennedy 

Mike Slaney Berton Churchill 

Lorrame Gloria Stuart 

Barton Tom Brown 

Mileaway Lew Kelly 

Grover Perkms Arthur Vinton 

Grover Perkms (as a boy) Mickey Bennett 

Jackson Clarence Muse 

Ed Perkms Douglas Dumbrille 

Ed Perkms (as a boy) Dick Winslow 

Brown field Noel Madison 

Hard To Handle 

(Warner) 
Comedy 

Showmanship sticks out all over this show 
in capital letters. It's about a showman. Lefty 
Merrill, a publicity man and a promoter, with 
as many gags for making money as there are 
stars in the skies and it provides almost as 
many laughs. Comedy from start to finish, it 
also carries a sympathy creating romance, 
glows with a grand line of peppy dialogue and 
is as speedy as it is timely and novel. 

Beginning with the final hours of a dance 
marathon, the hectic action is under way at 
once, as Lefty, the high-powered press agent 
of the marathon, is the big shot with the thou- 
sands of spectators who jam the dance hall 
and the apple of the eye of one of the con- 
testants, Ruth. The whole thing blows up in a 
riot of mirth as Lefty's partner skips out with 
the prize money and Lefty "takes it on the 
lam," just a couple of jumps ahead of the 
irate mob. Early scenes indicate that Lil 
Waters, Ruth's mother, is going to be very 
prominent in that which is to follow 'and she 
is — so much so that, although Cagney is billed 
as the head liner, Ruth Donnelly almost steals 
the show and you can guarantee that she will 
hand your patrons scores of laughs. 

A promoted treasure hunt on a pleasure pier 
also winds up in a riot as only $10 instead of 
the $5,000 that has been advertised is planted. 
As a hiatus the Lil Waters furniture selling 
episodes should bring the house down. The 
locale and excitement shift to New York. 
Lefty is broke; another big shot is making a 
play for Ruth and Lil is helping him along in 
grand style. A poor vanishing cream gives 
Lefty an idea. It won't "vanish," so he sells 
the manufacturers the idea of peddling it as a 
reducing cream and showmen are given an- 
other lesson in showmanship. 

Raising a million for a jerk-water college 
is the next episode and Lefty is on easy street 
and riding high with Ruth and her mother. 
Publicizing "Grape Fruit Acres" a Florida 
real estate gag lands Lefty in jail for using 
the mails to defraud as the promoter skips out 
to South America. In his cell, he meets his old 
dance marathon pal, who is emaciated as the 
result of a grapefruit diet because he had noth- 
ing else to eat. His misfortune is only a heaven 
sent idea for Lefty. 

As a result of his mammoth publicity cam- 
paign, the nation turns to grapefruit. The fa- 
mous 18-day diet is rung in. So is the famous 
Paul Whiteman reducing accomplishment. 
"Grape Fruit Acres" becomes a gold mine for 
the investors, the charges are dropped, but the 
exciting fun is not finished until Lefty pulls a 
typical gag stunt on Ruth and her mother to 
accept him as one of the family. 

Everything that has been described can be 
made the basis for a real interest-creating cam- 
paign in which everything from radio broad- 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



27 



casting, 24 sheeting, commercial tie-ups and 
gag exploitation down to teaser heralds can 
be used, as they are all used in the pictures. 
Use of those, however, even to the fullest ex- 
tent, shouldn't be the limit of your business 
building campaign. "Hard to Handle," which 
should be easy to handle, is Cagney's first pic- 
ture in months. He has proved his box office 
ability and with him taken out of his "tough 
mug" roles, it shouldn't be difficult to pick 
up on his established popularity. You can't 
afford to overlook Ruth Donnelly and, although 
her picture popularity is not great, you will 
find your patrons talking about her. Among the 
other things you do in connection with this pic- 
ture, it might not be a bad idea to ring in some- 
where in your advertising that it witnesses the 
beginning of a new star. 

The show is real entertainment for any kind 
of a theatre. As it kept a large preview audi- 
ence in spasms of everything from downright 
belly-laughs to emotion stirring smiles, it 
should do the same every place it is shown. 
It's great entertainment for the adults, yet at 
the same time is one of those pictures that 
you can shout about as suitable for the young- 
sters. — McCarthy, Hollywood. 

Produced and distributed by Warner. Directed by 
Mervyn LeRoy. Based on original story by Houston 
Branch. Screen play by Wilson Mizner and Robert 
Lord. Photographed by Barney McGill. Film editor. 
Bill Holmes. Art director, Robert Haas. Release 
date, January 28, 1933. Running time, 76 minutes. 
CAST 

Lefty Merrill James Cagney 

Ruth Waters Mary Brian 

Radio announcer Allen Jenkins 

Lil Waters Ruth Donnelly 

Marlene Reeves Claire Dodd 

John Hayden Gavin Gordon 

Mrs. Hawks E™™? 

Charles Reeves Robert McWade 

Ed. McGrath John Sheehan 

Joe Goetz Matt McHugh 



The Son-Daughter 

(MGM) 
Drama 

A tensely dramatic narrative of Chinese pa- 
triots' activity in San Francisco's Chinatown, 
adapted from the stage play by George M. 
Scarborough and David Belasco, "The Son- 
Daughter" offers another opportunity for Helen 
Hayes to display her splendid versatility and 
capacity as a dramatic actress. 

Her name, naturally enough, becomes the best 
selling point in the picture, with due emphasis 
on the fact that she won the Academy actress 
award for performance during 1932. The rest 
of the cast is almost equally able, certainly each 
has an undoubtedly strong box office following, 
can be counted upon for money at the till when 
their names appear in the lights. Ramon No- 
varro, Lewis Stone, Warner Oland, Ralph Mor- 
gan, Louise Closser Hale and H. B. Warner, 
all are selling names. 

Although it is true that the revolutionary 
activity in China is not at the moment in the 
public print in the same degree as was the 
Japanese aggression of some months ago, none- 
theless currently there is some little attention 
being paid to the situation in the Far East. 
Do not lose any opportunity to capitalize on this 
factor as well as the star names. 

The patriots in Chinatown are gathering 
money for the revolutionary cause despite great 
danger from the emperor's emissaries. Lewis 
Stone, Miss Hayes' father, is a leader in the 
"cause." Miss Hayes imparts a measure of 
lightness and amusement to the earher scenes 
with her wholly charming characterization of 
the shy Chinese girl, with her mincing gait, her 
shy love-making with the Chinese boy, Novarro. 
A ship loaded with munitions is waiting to sail. 
A large sum of money is needed before it can 
leave the dock. Only by "selling" his daughter 
to the highest bidder can Stone obtain the 
money. Miss Hayes sacrifices her love to the 
cause, and Novarro, a prince, does likewise. 
Oland is the highest bidder, taking the girl, 
killing her father and her lover. Rising to the 
crisis. Miss Hayes strangles Oland with his 
own queue, finds the money, and is seen at 
the close, with set face, sailing to aid the revolu- 
tion aboard the munitions ship. Her dramatic 
performance reaches its height, is tremendously 



effective in the strangling scene. Thus she 
becomes her father's "son-daughter," having 
done her share in the manner of a worthy son. 

Indicate in the selling the motif of sacrifice 
of love and of self for the cause of their fathers 
on the part of Miss Hayes and Novarro. Bring 
in the current interest in the Chinese situation, 
concentrate on the splendid cast and the per- 
formances, and declare emphatically and with 
assurance, that Miss Hayes here adds another 
splendid performance to her already impressive 
list. Properly sold from these several excellent 
angles, the picture should be good for an un- 
usual result at the box office. Lobby display 
opportunities for the attraction of pedestrian 
attention are likewise excellent. — Aaronson, 
New York. 

Produced and distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 
Directed by Clarence Brown. From the play by 
George M. Scarborough and David Belasco. Screen 
play by John Goodrich and Claudine West. Dialogue 
by Leon Gordon. Film editor, Margaret Booth. Pho- 
tographed by Oliver T. Marsh. Release date, Decem- 
ber 23, 1932. Running time, 79 minutes. 

CAST 

Tom Lee Ramon Novarro 

Lien Wha Helen Hayes 

Dr. Dong Tong Lewis Stone 

Fen Sha Warner Oland 

Fang Fou Hy Ralph Morgan 

Toy Yah Louise Closser Hale 

Sin Kai H. B. Warner 



Nagana 

(Universal) 
Weird 

Using a dramatic theme that is suggestive of 
the anti-climactic scenes of "Arrowsmith," sur- 
rounding it with the atmosphere of the jungle 
animal picture cycle, introducing a weird ro- 
mance through the personality of Tala Birell 
(another Garbo-Dietrich combination) and lay- 
ing the whole thing down in the heart of dark- 
est Africa, "Nagana" appears to be ordinary 
program entertainment. 

Modern science, represented by the first two 
doctors, is waging a battle against the dread 
"nagana" — sleeping sickness. Savage supersti- 
tion is personified by Nogu, an English univer- 
sity graduate, and his father. The King. On 
the spot in the native village unless he can 
prove his science more efficient than the super- 
stitution of the Medicine Men in saving the life 
of The King, and after a roundup of wild ani- 
mals, Randon has further troubles as the sav- 
ages find the Countess, who has trailed his 
safari into the jungle. Convinced that she is a 
demon responsible for all their afflic- 
tions, they determine to slay her. Randon 
intervenes. A lot of dramatic hokus-pokus 
ensues, but the King dies and amid a lot 
of excitement the tribesmen are going to throw 
the white girl to the crocodiles. Randon saves 
her, of course, but the drama is not convincing 
even though it is quite thrilling. Then comes 
the typical struggle back to civilization. 

This picture did not register well with the 
preview audience, which tittered in the most 
unexpected places. By its nature there is op- 
portunity for atmospheric ballyhoo which may 
strengthen the straight title and cast billing. — 
McCarthy, Hollywood. 

Produced and distributed by Universal. Directed by 
Ernst L. Frank. From the story by Lester Cohen. 
Screen play by Dale Van Every and Don Ryan. Pho- 
tographed by George Robinson. Release date, Janu- 
ary 9, 193'3. Running time, 74 minutes. 

CAST 

Countess Sandra Lubeska Tala Birell 

Dr. Walter Randon Melvyn Douglas 

Dr. Kabayochai M. Morita 

Dr. Stark Onslow Stevens 

Nogu Everett Brown 

The King Billy McLean 

Mukovo William Dunn 

Ivory Trader Frank Lakteen 



establish a completely new economic life in 
America based on the country's energy re- 
sources. Produced by Bryan Foy Corporation, 
the picture employs an after-dinner speech by 
Professor Gilbert Brown to convey the mes- 
sage of technocracy. Flashes of printing 
presses, looms, harvesters and ships emphasize 
Professor Brown's point of the ultimate break- 
down of our present economic system. The 
several questions asked by guests serve to 
direct the discussion along lines of public in- 
terest. The steadily increasing curiosity about 
technocracy can be readily used as a basis for 
promotion. — Running time, 10 minutes. 



Paramount Pictorial 

(Paramount) 
Good 

This short pictorial shows some of the 
really grand scenery of the California redwood 
forests. It is done in full color and conveys a 
real sense of the grandeur of these giant trees. 
The depths of the forest is streaked with glow- 
ing bars of sunlight as the camera takes the 
traveler down a winding road. A really good 
pictorial. — Running time, 7 minutes. 



Time On My Hands 

(Paramount) 
Fair 

Ethel Merman sings the song, perched on the 
hour hand of a gigantic clock. The photo- 
graphic ideas are fairly clever; the music well 
played. As in others in the series, the bounc- 
ing ball is introduced to lead the audience in 
singing. — Running time, 7 minutes. 



Belles of Bali 

(Fox) 
Interesting 

Interesting is this subject in the Fox "Magic 
Carpet of Movietone" series, wherein is de- 
picted the life of the Balinese, inhabitants of 
that island paradise in the Pacific where things 
move slowly, where festivities and ceremonials 
are the dominant features of activity, and where 
the motion picture camera has recently pene- 
trated with its inquisitive eye. The subject is 
well executed, the subject matter provides an 
engaging picture of how another people lives. 
A good short for almost any program. — Run- 
ning time, 8 minutes. 



Chalk Up 

(MGM) 
Skillful 

In this number of the Sport Champion series, 
Willie Hoppe, for many years world's cham- 
pion billiard player, gives evidence of his re- 
markable skill with the cue and ivories. He 
almost makes them talk as he executes, appar- 
ently with the greatest of ease, the most difficult 
of cushion shots in billiards and weird ex- 
amples of his skill on the pool table. The cue 
player will rave about this, while the average 
picture-goer will sit in awe of such uncanny 
accuracy. — Running time, 10 minutes. 



Technocracy 

(Mascot) 



Good 

This is probably the first exposition of the 
planv sponsored by the socalled technocrats, to 



Boston Common — and Proper 

(Central Films) 
Average 

Just another collection of air views and close- 
ups of a city whose importance in revolutionary 
days does not necessarily carry over to modern 
scenes. Off-screen narration is uninspired. — 
Running time, 10 minutes. 

The Gaslit Nineties 

(Educational) 
Novelty 

The public that likes shots of the early days 
of the industry should get some fun out of 
this Johnnie Walker novelty in which the run- 
ning comment in the dialogue background 
■ brings out the contrast of past and present 
with a laugh. — Running time, 8 minutes. 



I 



FOUR * * * * STARS 

A superb picturization of Philip Barry's "Animal 
Kingdom" . . . "Animal Kingdom" is an added treat 
when you consider that a thorough tour of this 
marvelous theatre is worth four stars in itself . . . 
Howard is even grander in the picture than he was 
in the play . . . Myrna Loy is sensuous and exotic as 
the girl . . . Ann Harding puts it over like the lovely 
actress she is . . , Settings and photography are 100% 
perfect . , . 

IRENE THIRER, DAILY NEWS 

A modern masterpiece of wit and wisdom . . . With 
Leslie Howard performing his usual magic . . . 

RICHARD WATTS. JR.. HERALD TRIBUNE 





ANN HAR] 

"THE AN 




Crackling crisp, bright, brisk and brittie . . . Philip 
Barry's ploy added further distinction to last night's 
great event — the opening of the RKO-Roxy Theatre 
in Radio City ... A distinguished picture in a dis- 
tinguished setting ... If anything, the picture excels 
the play . . . 

REGINA CREWE, N. Y. AMERICAN 

"Animal Kingdom" holds its own with Mr. Rothafel's 
glamorous footlights numbers . . . Never has Mr. 
Howard been seen to better advantage . . . Edward 
H. Griffith, the director, keeps the story flowing in- 
terestingly ... A picture in which the playwright's 
ideas have been adhered to faithfully . . . 

MORDAUNT HALL, N. Y. TIMES 



An adaptation of a play that happened io be a 
strongly and beautifully written dramatic work . . . 
I suspect, indeed, that "The Animal Kingdom," may 
even be among the American classics for some time 
to come . . , A beautifully directed and recorded film, 
and a iastoful, impeccable production, make it quite 
a bit superior to the general run of films . . . 

JOHN S. COHEN, JR., N. Y. SUN 

"The Animal Kingdom" is graciously played by 
Miss Harding and Leslie Howard, intelligently 
directed by E. H. Griffith . . . The dialogue is very 
gay and saucy . . . 

BLAND JOHANESON, DAILY MIRROR 



)iG . . LESLIE HOWARD 



lAL KINGDOM" 





30 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



HIGHLIGHTS OF 1932 PASS IN REVIEW 



A panoramic re-viewing of the year that is now beyond the horizon presents nnore than its 
quota of lights — and shadows. The motivation by new forces that was already evident early in 1931 
gained even further momentum as the year 1932 got under way and the close of the twelve-month 
found the spirit of change extending its range into all primary fields of the institution that is the mo- 
tion picture. One of the cheerful signs lay in the orderly and mature method of approaching 
the multiple problem of improving entertainment and the presentation of that entertainment while 
gathering the loose ends of costs into an efficient workability. That story also is told in its stages of 
unfoldment in the following chronology of the year: 



JANUARY 



January 2 

Publix theatres collect $100,000 during National M. P. 
Week for poor. 

January 5 

Legality of new RKO financing plan attacked in suit 
for receivership filed by J. Cookman Boyd, Balti- 
more attorney and RKO stockholder. 

Paramount to release only 60 pictures of scheduled 
70 for the year. 

Loew's business maintains level of preceding year. 

Industry floods Congress with protests against ad- 
mission tax legislation. 

January 7 

W. A. Stefifes elected president of Allied, succeeding 
Abram F. Myers, who becomes chairman of board. 
January 8 

David SarnofT, Herbert Bayard Swope, Paul Mazur 
named to special advisory committee on RKO 
policy. 

January 9 

RCA Photophone consolidated with RCA Victor. 
January I I 

Coast producers agree to end star "raids" and decide 
on open door policy for future negotiations for 
services of stars. 

Hughes -Franklin Circuit begins turning back theatres 
to original owners. 

Winfield Sheehan given three months leave of ab- 
sence to recover from illness. 

January 12 

Demand for 50 per cent service charge reduction, 
abolition of score charges, fair readjustment of 
union wage schedules and reorganization of M.P. 
T.O.A. structure demanded by President M. A. 
Lightman. 

January 13 

Ned Depinet made vice-president of Radio in charge 
of distribution; Charles Rosenzweig appointed gen- 
eral sales manager. 

January 16 

Group of 35 independent producers form protective 
association to handle labor, distribution problems. 
January 20 

Spyros Skouras takes over management of Fox West 

Coast. 
January 21 

Sidney R. Kent resigns as vice-president and a di- 
rector of Paramount Publix after 14 years. 
January 22 

Emanuel Cohen elected director and vice-president of 
Paramount; George J. Schaefer. eastern sales man- 
ager appointed geneial sales manager, succeeding 
S. R. Kent. 

E. L. Alperson resigns as Warner-F. N. general 

sales manager. 
January 27 

E. R. Tinker starts west for first conferences at Fox 
studio. 

Federal court decisions fortify application of copy- 
right law. 
January 28 

Holders of RKO preferred stock start action to liave 
representative in executive post in company, with 
Karl Hoblitzelle, E. V. Richards, Jr., and Harold 
B. Franklin mentioned. 

'E. L. Alperson and Edward Peskay plan mid-west 
theatre circuit. 

Survey shows 10,767,411 theatre seats in U. S. 

January 29 

M-G-M moves to prohibit double featuring of its 
product. 

Independent studios schedule 200 pictures. 



FEBRUARY 



February I 

Harry Cohn buys Joe Brandt's interest in Columbia 
giving him control of company. 

More than 200 theatres in Iowa and Nebraska con- 
tribute to prosecution fund of W. N. Youngclaus 
against extended protection for circuit theatres. 

February 2 

Radio drops Pathe's rooster trade mark and, con- 
solidating production schedules of Radio-Pathe, will 
make between 30 and 40 pictures during year. 



February 3 

Skouras puts theatre managers on profit sharing 

basis. 
February 4 

W. A. StefTes, Allied president, says his organization 
is no longer interested in obtaining S-S-5 uniform 
contract. 

Walter Wanger joins Columbia as vice-president, in 

charge of story selection and talent. 
Skouras deal to take over 550 Wesco Corp., houses, 

Feb. 15 closed. 
February 5 

Distributors expected to offer exhibitors 5-5-5 uni- 
form contract and individual company contracts for 
choice with opening of new selling season. 

February 6 

Establishment of national . circuit of independent 
theatres planned by Dick Dickson. 

M. H. Hoffman, president of newly-formed Indepen- 
dent Producers Association, has five-year franchise 
plan. 

February 8 

Chicago Allied exhibitors pledged to end triple fea- 
tures. 
February 9 

Dr. Lee DeForest made defendant in patent action 
filed in Wilmington by William Fox's American 
Tri- Ergon Corp. 

Warner's report profit of $543,573 for last quarter of 
1931. 

February I I 

E. R. Tinker, Fox president, tells Academy industry 

is growing up. 
February 12 

Sam Katz revealed as exercising direct supervision 
of all Paramount Publix activities and particularly 
production. 

Lou Metzger resigns as general sales manager_ of 
Columbia and Bert Ennis as director of publicity. 
February 16 

Wisconsin state department of agriculture and mar- 
kets cites 15 producing, distributing and theatre 
companies in complaint charging conspiracy, dis- 
crimination, coercion. 

Charles Rosenzweig resigns as general sales manager 
of Radio to assume similar post with Columbia. 

February 17 

M.P.T.O. of Connecticut joins M.P.T.O,A. 
February 18 

Joseph I. Schnitzer announces "open door" film buy- 
ing policy for RKO. 
February 19 

R. R. Blair, Indianapolis exhibitor, starts conspiracy 
and restraint of trade suit against producer-dis- 
tributors, asking damages of $1,200,000. 

February 20 

Ogden L. Mills, new secretary of treasury, considers 
tax on film rentals to raise $10,000,000 to $15,000,000 
annually. 

S. W. Hatch resigns as Educational sales manager. 
Allied says it favors one national exhibitor organiza- 
tion if it is independent. 
February 23 

H. B. Franklin brought into RKO to survey circuit 

and act in executive advisory capacity. 
S. R. Kent opens negotiations with Fox, abandoning 

talks on RKO association. 
Settlement of unexpired three-year portion of Phil 

Reisman's contract with Universal made, with L. J. 

Schlaifer in as successor. 
Distributors consider closing Portland exchanges to 

serve entire territory out of Seattle. 
February 24 

Federal investigation demanded by U. S. Senator 
S. W. Brookhart in two-hour arraignment of in- 
dustry in senate. 

Monogram announces schedule of 40 pictures for year. 

February 25 

Allied seen backing federal investigation by supply- 
ing Senator Brookhart with data. 

Joe Schnitzer to enter independent production on 
leaving RKO. 

February 26 

Jules Levy made Radio general sales manager. 
Skourases make sweeping staff reductions and salary 

cuts in Fox Midwesco. 
February 27 

Universal shows profit of $615,787 during 1931, com- 
pared with loss of $2,047,821 preceding year. 
February 29 

Eighth court to uphold copyright law gives favor- 
able decision at Springfield, 111. 



MARCH 



March I 

U. S. Senator Hastings appointed receiver for Gen- 
eral Theatre Equipment. 
March 3 

Warners cite $3,500,000 cash and bank credit of "a 
large amount" in answering Maurice Newcastle's 
insolvency charge at Wilmington. 

March 4 

Academy of M. P. Arts and Sciences supplied with 

machinery for conciliating production disputes. 
March 7 

MPDA begins poll of celebrities to determine film 

preferences. 
March 8 

Canadian conspiracy case against 15 producer- 
distributors dismissed at Toronto. 

Bill calling for 10 per cent tax on admissions over 
25 cents and 2!4 per cent levy on film rentals goes 
to House. 

March 9 

Allied plans to seek public support for fight against 

extended protection. 
March 10 

Allied Detroit convention endorses Brookhart bill. 
Distributors plan to copyright accessories in move 

to prevent re-sale. 
March II 

W. A. Steffes frames "walkout" at Detroit conven- 
tion and Allied delegates contribute $15,000 in cash 
and $45,000 in pledges to carry out convention pro- 
gram. 

Bill introduced at Washington to amend penalties 

fixed by copyright law for picture holdovers. 
March 14 

Protection of "innocent" infringers provided for in 

new copyright law draft. 
March 15 

George Eastman, head of Eastman Kodak Co., dies 
at Rochester. 

Independent exhibitors assume control of M.P. T.O.A. 
March 16 

Fair protection schedules, selective buying and round 
table discussions to settle industry problems advo- 
cated by M.P.T.O.A. convention at Washington. 

March 17 

M.P.T.O.A. convention declares for optional form of 

standard contract. 
March 22 

Distributors' injunction granted by Wisconsin court 
halting state department's investigation of protec- 
tion and zoning. 

March 23 

Fox directors confirm election of S. R. Kent to post 
of vice-president in charge of operations and that 
of Leonard A. Woolams. New York banker, to vice- 
president in charge of finances in the west. 

Tiffany plans 30 pictures through World Wide re- 
lease. 

March 24 

Joseph Schnitzer plans new independent producing 
organization making 24 to 32 features a year. 

Principal Distributing Corp., organized with Sol Les- 
ser, president, Frank R. Wilson, vice president, to 
handle pictures formerly distributed by Talking Pic- 
ture Epics. 

March 25 

Ten equipment companies grouped in General Thea- 
tres Equipment, Inc., to be operated individually 
under plan proposed by Senator Daniel O. Hastings, 
receiver. 

March 26 

Hy Daab, Radio advertising and publicity director, 
and Eli M. Orowitz, RKO advertising and publicity 
director, resign, with S. Barrett McCormick and 
Terry Turner succeeding, respectively, under Robert 
F. Sisk, advertising and publicity director for both 
companies. 

March 29 

B. B. Kahane placed in charge of Radio Pictures. 
March 31 

House approves amendment exempting tickets up to 

45 cents from admission tax levies. 
Nine major producers schedule 390 pictures for the 

new season; only three pictures less than 1931. 
Academy of M. P. Arts_ and Sciences proposes uniform 

image frame for projection machines. 

ITIiis chronicle was prepared by Motion Picture Dailyl 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



31 



SPIRIT OF CHANCE INCREASES SCOPE 



APRIL 



April I 

Poster renters contemplate orpranization and "war 
chest" to combat distributors' opposition to re- 
sale of accessories. 

Paramount negotiates $15,000,000 credit with group of 
New York, Chicago and Philadelphia banks. 

Fox write-offs contribute to company's $4,263,557 loss 
for 1931. 

Independents expected to produce 400 pictures this 
season. 

Canadian exhibitors approve voluntary arbitration at 

Toronto conference. 
April 2 

P. A. Powers organizes Powers Pictures, after 
acquiring interest in B. I. P., carrying with it 
American distribution rights to British company's 
product. 

New York exhibitors join move to retain re-sale 

market for accessories. 
Joseph Skirboll appointed sales manager of new 

Principal Distributing. 
April 4 

Screen Guild plans co-operative production with re- 
lease through United Artists. 

Paramount reports combined net profit of $6,345,4S8 
for 1931 despite loss of $649,746 for final quarter. 

April 6 

U. S. circuit court in New York gives "clean bill" 
to block booking practice, ending 12- year old suit 
of Federal Trade Commission against Parainount. 

M-G-M protest committee fails to take stand on 
distributor's percentage playing policy. 

Distributors delay drawing of zoning schedules pend- 
ing outcome of Youngclaus suit at Lincoln, Neb. 

April 8 

Second victory for legality of block booking seen in 
consent decree entered by federal court at Chi- 
cago ending three-year-old monopoly suit against 
21 companies by Marks Bros. 

Skouras plans decentralized operation of Fox theatres. 

April II 

Paramount completes deal for release of Sennett 
comedies, formerly handled by Educational. 

Senate investigation of bear raids on stocks, in- 
cluding film issues, on New York Exchange opens 
in Washington. 

April 13 

Poster renters complete defense organization. 

U. S. circuit court of appeals at Boston rules that 

picture holdovers are copyright infringements. 
April 14 

RKO board completes reorganization of company 
with M. H. Aylesworth in as president; Hiram 
Brown as advisor; B. B. Kahane as president of 
Radio Pictures; Harold B. Franklin in charge of 
theatres as president of Orpheum Circuit and 
K.-A.-O. ; Joe Plunkett, vice-president of theatre 
companies; Phil Reisman in charge of film buys, 
and David Sarnof? re-elected chairman of the 
board of RKO and chairman of executive committee. 

April 16 

M-G-M, Paramount and Warners get new season 

selling under way early. 
April 18 

Warners, RKO and Loew's pool theatres at Memphis 
to solve overseating and effect operating economies. 
April 19 

H. B. Franklin completes "six-divisional" set-up for 

RKO theatre operation. 
Hal Roach schedules 40 shorts, two features for 

season. 
April 20 

S. R. Kent elected president of Fox and director. 

E. R. Tinker, former president, becomes chairman 

of board, succeeding Harley L. Clarke. W. C. 

Michel, vice-president, succeeds Kent as executive 

vice-president. 
April 21 

Skouras plan puts operation- of circuit under Charles 
Cabalero, L. J. Ludwig, George and Charles 
Skouras. 

Herschel Stuart named to head RKO field operations. 
April 22 

Gabriel Hess, counsel for MPPDA, denies at Cleve- 
land exhibitors' hearing that Hays organization and 
Film Boards of Trade are "one and the same." 

April 23 

Academy of M. P. Arts and Sciences wins revision 

of arbitration over "star raiding." 
April 26 

Jesse L. Lasky asked to take three-month leave of 

absence by Paramount. 
April 27 

Screen Guild, new co-operative producing unit to re- 
lease through United Artists. 
April 28 

RKO plans to reduce overhead $3,000,000. 
April 29 

Salary cuts for stars being given impetus. 
April 30 

Federal Trade Commission asks Department of Jus- 
tice to inaugurate appeal of federal circuit court 
decision, upholding block booking. 



Allied asks for $10,000 to carry agitation for passage 

of Brookhart bill to the public. 
Universal's sales force, meeting in San Francisco, 

hears of new line-up for 25 features, five serials, 

182 shorts. 



MAY 



May 3 

Monog^am announces 32 pictures for new season. 
S. R. Kent tells Academy meeting New York and 

Hollywood must co-ordinate to work out industry's 

problems. 
May 5 

Paramount gathers in Los Angeles for annual sales 

meet. 
May 6 

Paramount announces minimum of 63 features for 

season. 
May 9 

Universal announces 26 specials, two road-shows as 

part of new schedule. 
May 10 

Radio announces 62 features, 208 shorts, including 

newsreel issues, for new season. 
May II 

Al Lichtman. vice-president of United Artists in 
charge of distribution, outlines exclusive run plan. 
May 12 

M-G-M seen ready to inaugurate exclusive selling 

plan similar to that advocated by Al Lichtman. 
May 13 

Columbia schedules 30 to 38 pictures. 
May 14 

Winfield Sheehan due back in full control of Fox 

studio June 1. 
M. A. Lightman asks that "class" and "mass" 

appeal films be sold separately. 
Educational plans 128 on new schedule. 
Erpi to install wide range equipment. 
May 16 

World Wide plans 38 for new season. 
Radio opens sales meet in Chicago. 
S. R. Kent makes debut before Fox sales staff as 

company opens convention in New York. 
May 17 

Fox announces 44 regulars and four specials for new 
season. 

Radio will make 143 shorts during season. 
May 18 

Paramount drops Jesse Lasky as vice-president of 

company. 
May 19 

Joe Brandt enters Educational as president of World 

Wide; Joe Goldberg as vice-president. 
Radio lists 62 pictures, including three specials, on 

new schedule. 

May 2! 

M.P.T.O.A. transfers control of organization to in- 
dependent leadership by electing six new members 
to its executive committee. 

May 23 

Columbia will make 48 pictures during new season. 
Jack Cohn tells Atlantic City sales meet. 

May 25 

House kills Representative Sirovich's amended copy- 
right bill eliminating music tax. 

Chicago exhibitors find improvement under single fea- 
ture policy. 

Columbia sales meet told of new plan to eliminate 
"blind" buying. Provides for previewing of pic- 
tures before exhibition value is fixed. 

May 26 

Canadian distributors agree on and ratify new stand- 
ard form of exhibition contract. 

May 28 

New tax amendment exempts tickets up to 45 cents. 



JUNE 



June I 

RKO and Warners begin pooling of Ohio theatres. 
June 2 

Canadian Film Board adopts arbitration rules for 
use under new standard contract. 

June 6 

First of four Warner regional sales meets opens in 
New York. 

June 7 

President Hoover signs bill levying 10 per cent tax 
on admissions over 41 cents, effective June 21. 

Nick Paper's anti-trust suit against distributors, with 
arbitration the issue, goes to trial at Lincoln, Neb. 

June 8 

I.A.T.S.E. brands rival unions as "racketeers." 

Kansas supreme court rules distributor cannot fix 
price an exhibitor is to charge to show such dis- 
tributor's product. 

Warner's sales force placed on bonus system. 



June 13 

RKO and Loew's call off pooling deals. 

Paramount announces four productions to cost 

$1,000,000 each. 
June 14 

Circuits decide on passing admission tax on to public 
Creditors agree to continue Roxy Theatre receiver- 
ship. 
June 15 

Believe 5-5-5 contract will be offered as optional 
form to individual company contracts with ex- 
hibitor signifying which he prefers. 

Begin preparation of standard contract form for use 
of licensed agents in dealing with players and 
studios. 

Coast studios begin move to cut costs. 
June 16 

H. B. Franklin says Joe Plunkett is out as vice- 
president of Keith-Albee-Orpheum and Orpheum 
Circuit. 

June 17 

Verdict faVoring distributors is returned in Nick 
Paper anti-trust suit at Lincoln, Neb. 

Emanuel Cohen given Jesse Lasky's title at Para- 
mount studio; Lasky says he is still with company. 

June 18 

B. P. Schulberg retires as managing director of 
Paramount production, leaving Emanuel Cohen in 
charge. 

William Fox charged with selling own stocks short, 

during senate bank committee quiz. 
June 20 

World Wide set to release 30 during year. Educa- 
tional increases its shorts list to 166. 
June 21 

Admission tax goes into effect with 400 houses esti- 
mated affected by levy of 10 per cent on admissions 
over 41 cents. 

Educational-World Wide sales forces told two com- 
panies are to stay apart in sales activities, as con- 
vention opens in New York. 

M. H. Aylesworth, RKO head, turns bullish on indus- 
try following bear talk at Academy dinner. 

June 22 

Deal for pooling of RKO and Skouras houses in Man- 
hattan is signed. 

William Fox sued for $5,000,000 by Fox Theatres 
Corp. on charge he used position as former head of 
corporation for personal enrichment, in connection 
with stock deals. 

June 23 

United Artists announces it will inaugurate exclusive 
run selling plan with new season's program. 

Kansas distributors join to appeal state supreme court 
decision holding all film contracts to be illegal there. 

June 24 

Major company's contracts analyzed and criticized at 
Allied eastern meeting, with move on foot to con- 
solidate independent i)uying power for purchase of 
independent productions to avoid contract demands 
of major companies. 

June 25 

M-G-M announces 50 features on new schedule as 
sales meet opens in Philadelphia. 

Allied eastern meeting unofficially condemns double 
featuring but leaves action to individual units. 

Hollywood studio activities at new low with major 
companies working on only 29 pictures and inde- 
pendents on 10. 

June 27 

Hiram S. Brown withdraws from RKO on Aug. 1. 

Allied eastern meeting disbands without conclusive 
action on three major subjects of meeting; co- 
operative buying, tax vigilance committee and leg- 
islative activities. 

June 28 

Warners begin anti-trust action against E'rpi at 
Wilmington seeking to end service charges. 

Interchangeability of stars and directors gains favor 
on coast. 

June 30 

Two-for-one admissions for less than 20 cents held 
to be contract breach in Greater New York area. 



JULY 



July I 

Fox Film sues William Fox for over $10,000,000, 
charging fraud in connection with various contracts 
and deals. 

W. E. Paschall acquires 50 per cent interest in for- 
mer Publix-Dent circuit of 46 houses in Texas. 
July 5 

Federal court at Lincoln, Neb., decides in favor of 
W. N. Youngclaus in suit against distributors; 
grants permanent injunction to plaintiff and de- 
clares protection and zoning agreements in dispute 
to be in restraint of trade and violation of anti- 
trust act. 

July 6 

Harry Arthur in deal for six Publix New England 

houses. 
July 7 

Allied addresses inquiry on S-S-5 contract status to 
S. R. Kent. 



The Fl RST SMASH 



The news is out - A tiny whisper grew into a 

roar. . . The first smash hit of 1933 is now ready! 

The great new Roxy has booked it! The R-K-O 
Circuit has grabbed it for 40 day and date booliings 
across the country. 

Only a few in the east and on the coast saw "The 
Bitter Tea of General Yen/^ We wanted to keep it 
quiet ... for a while . . . but the rave was on, the 
word of mouth got busy, swept the country like a 
hurricane. Now thousands of exhibitors are talking 
about it, waiting for it, advertising it to their patrons. 

Millions know aboiit it . . . and want to see it. 




(I 



ihe BITTER 

GENERM 



NILS ASTHEI 

GAVIN GORDOr 

From the Novel h 

A FRANK CAPR^ 



HIT OF 1935 



Columbia is backing this sensational picture ^ with its 
app>eal to all men, all womei^'% with a huge advertis- 
ing campaign in all leading ian magazinei with their 
circulation of millions. 

A mammoth pressbook/ loaded with exhibitor helps 
great line of accessories/ point the way to big 
profits. Real showmen everywhere are riding the 
''i^ave of popular interest/ are tieing up to the Columbia 
campaign, and plugging the picture now in lobby 
and newspaper advertising/ regardless of when they 
play it. Free/teaser trailers, free one sheet announce- 
ment posters at all Columbia exchanges/ help them' 
do it. Get yours now if you ha ven^t already ^one so. 

Get on the bandwagon!^ Get your sliare of this 

flood of business ! 




rEN 

/ALTER CO 

)SHIA MORI 

'faring Stone 

:ODUCTION 



ICTURE 



34 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



LIGHTS AND SHADOWS IN YEAR 1932 



Survey shows only 13 circuit theatres in three cities 
have been embraced in poolinpr deals actually com- 
pleted, although negotiations have involved 60 the- 
atres in 17 cities. 

Federal district court at Grand Forks, N. D., holds 
standard exhibition contract illegal and exhibitors 
and distributors parties to it an illegal combination. 

July 9 

RKO and Publix pool six houses. 
July II 

Will H. Hays suggests summary action against pro- 
ducers who violate advertising code of ethics. 

Admission tax stands as sole federal legislation affect- 
ing theatres enacted during current session just 
closing. 

July 13 

Academy approves nevr arbitration agreement, in- 
cluding banning of raids on talent, secret negotia- 
tions with competing companies' employes, pre- 
mature negotiations, and providing conditions of 
re- employment. 

Allied advocates national conference board to settle 
industry disputes. 

Universal completes divestment of theatres, with con- 
trol left of only four, and minor stock and lease 
interests in 65. 

July 14 

M.P.T.O. of Connecticut hits at exclusive runs. 
Majestic lists 26 features for new season. 
July 15 

All major companies seen ready to ask 15-cent mini- 
mum admission standard for new product. 

M-G-M and Loew's inaugurate salary cuts up to 
35 per cent. 

I.A.T.S.E.. promises thorough investigation of racket- 
eering charges made against Sam Kaplan, head of 
Local 306. 

July 16 

New executive line-up at Fox studios gives Winfield 
Sheehan former title of vice-president and general 
manager. 

July 18 

Three per cent Federal consumer tax on electricity 

seen draining large sums weekly from theatres. 
July 19 

Hays ad code is upheld by executive committee of 
MPPDA. 

United Theatres, New Orleans, and 11 distributors 

named in anti- trust action. 
July 20 

German quota laws seen as serious problem for pro- 
ducer-distributors here. 
July 21 

No effect on sale or exhibition of film in Kansas seen 
by local distributors as result of state supreme 
court decision holding old standard contract illegal. 

Adolph Zukor, on good-will tour for Paramount, tells 
Boston audience Sam Katz ushers in new day for 
company. 

July 25 

Will H. Hays effects out-of-court settlement of Cleve- 
land exhibitors' suit. Beginning working out details 
of agreement on protection. 

RKO joins move for 15-cent minimum admissions. 

M.P.T.O.A. plans finish fight to obtain 5-5-5 contract 
for current selling season. 

July 26 

Warners' move withdrawing right of stars to choose 

stories and roles seen influencing other studios. 
July 27 

Cost of sound improvement only bar to studio ad- 
vances. 
July 29 

Erpi starts suit to end transfer of equipment 

from one theatre to another. 
French dubbing decree handicaps American producers. 
Publix and Dickinson circuits turn back theatres in 

Kansas City area. 



AUGUST 



August I 

Operators' war on in New York between Local 306 

and Empire State organization. 
August 2 

James R. Quirk, publisher of "Photoplay," dies. 
August 3 

Distributors will take no appeal against Youngclaus 
decision, declaring Nebraska court's ruling applied 
only to one protection plan and is harmless as far 
as industry is concerned. 

August 4 

M. A. Lightman calls for buying strike by members 
of M.P.T.O.A. to force showdown on 5-5-5 adoption. 
August 1 1 

Sam Katz tells 60 guest critics in New York — Para- 
mount is "shooting its bankroll" and staking fu- 
ture on 18 new pictures. 

August 13 

S. R. Kent returns from England where out-of-court 
settlement of suit brought by Fox to dissolve deal 
under which it acquired interest in Gaumont- British 
was effected. 



August 15 

Memphis theatre pool proves unsatisfactory and is 

called off by Loew's, RKO and Warners. 
August 16 

Kansas City film rentals for new product are 25 per 
cent higher than for previous season, survey reveals. 
August 18 

M-G-M will end all foreign language production until 
more equitable quota laws are enacted by foreign 
nations. 

August 19 

Admission taxes for June netted government $343,- 
691.92. 

August 23 

Local 306, New York operators' union, files suit 
against distributors claiming conspiracy in refusing 
to service the local's three open air theatres with 
film. 

Publix, RKO and Warners confer on new theatre 
poolings. 

Lightman seeks new standard contract form in place 
of 5-5-5 draft, crediting Universal and Fox with 
cooperation, 

August 24 

Allied directors meeting at Chicago authorize com- 
mittee to meet with M.P.T.O.A. with view to co- 
operating on several points in joint exhibitor pro- 
gram. 

August 25 

Will H. Hays considers plans for ending injurious fan 
magazine interviews with stars following much dis- 
cussed publication of one with Tallulah Bankhead. 

August 27 

Cleveland exhibitors sign suit settlement agreement 

which reduces circuit protection. 
August 29 

Producers agree on ban for players who break con- 
tracts. 
August 30 

Theatre openings in last 60 days reach 1,000. 
Warner-F. N. completes plans for increased foreign 

production. 
August 3 I 

William C. Elliott, president I.A.T.S.E., advises lo- 
cals to avoid strikes and seek amicable settlements 
of new contracts being negotiated. 

Film buying for Skouras circuit split among Edward 
Peskay, J. J. Sullivan and Fred Stein. 



SEPTEMBER 



September I 

Hiram S. Brown expected to enter Beacon Films if 
new financing is obtained to permit reorganization 
for production and distribution of standard features 
in place of non- theatrical product. 

September 2 

Detroit exhibitors put double featuring ban into ef- 
fect. . 

Skouras managers are given complete control of their 
houses in final step of returning operations to field. 

September 3 

Producers, with exception of Warner-F. N., request 
Erpi to renew agreement by which it serves as 
their representative with music publishers in nego- 
tiations to use American music. 

Film stock issues njake gain of $41,766,278 in market 
value during two months. 

September 6 

RKO rejects exclusive runs. 

Paul Bern, M-G-M associate producer and husband 

of Jean Harlow, dies. 
September 7 

Publix takes first decisive step in decentralization of 
national circuit with deal closed to turn over opera- 
tion of theatres in 14 southern cities to Kincey- 
Wilby. 

Business shows improvements and numerous theatres 

reopen. 
September 8 

Producers will deliver 327 pictures of 359 scheduled 

for 1931-32. 
September 9 

Fred Desberg, general manager of Loew's at Cleve- 
land, dies. 

M-G-M's exclusive run deals stirs up exhibitors. 
September 10 

Control of Trans Lux Daylight Screen Corp. retained 
by Percy N. Furber after sharp clash with A. M. 
Andrews at lengthy stockholders' meet. 

September 13 

S. R. Kent announces Fox will make no more ex- 
clusive run deals. 
United Artists joins M-G-M in selling exclusive runs. 

September 14 

Exhibitor protests will not affect exclusive run sales 
policies of M-G-M, United Artists and Paramount, 
companies' sales managers say. 

September 16 

Irwin Esmond attorney for New York state depart- 
ment of education named to succeed James Wingate 



as head of New York censor board, as latter accepts 
MPPDA coast position. 
September 17 

W. A. Steffes files suit to restrain distributors from 
enforcing Minneapolis zoning plan. Asks $3,000 dam- 
ages allegedly suffered through purported inability 
to obtain product. 

September 19 

Joint meeting of Allied-M.P.T.O.A. representatives 
under way at Chicago with unified stand of two 
national exhibitor organizations on common objec- 
tives expected to result. 

September 20 

Publix-Dubinsky agree to dissolve partnership at 
Kansas City, ending operation, controversy and 
court action. Move seen as further step in decen- 
tralization of Publix circuit. 

September 21 

Allied and M.P.T.O.A. representatives agree on pro- 
gram of federaj legislation to bring about industry 
reforms, "all other means having failed." Program 
calls for drafting of new standard contract to be 
ratified by both exhibitor organizations and sub- 
mitted to distributors to be offered to exhibitors 
who want it. Alternative move embraces introduc- 
tion of federal bill in congress bringing about in- 
dustry reforms on protection, block booking, exclu- 
sive runs. Calls for passage of Brookhart biU and 
campaign by exhibitors to obtain public support for 
industry legislation. 

September 22 

Exhibitors' meeting at Chicago lays plans for national 
exhibitors' mass meetings to pass on exclusive pro- 
gram drawn up, calling for federal legislation. 

September 23 

Loew's signs Cleveland zoning agreement as first of 
circuits involved to ratify settlement of monopoly 
action. 

September 24 

Nicholas M. Schenck "surprised" by action taken by 
exhibitors' meeting at Chicago. Defends M-G-M's 
policy on exclusive runs. 

Erpi makes settlement on music publishers' claim 
against producers for use of copyrighted music, 
bringing renewal of agreement nearer. 

September 26 

Attorneys prepare for fight over Roxy name. 
September 27 

Three newsreels sign one-year agreement with cam- 
eramen's unions. 
September 28 

Local 306, New York operators' union, denied injunc- 
tion against distributors for alleged failure to ser- 
vice organization's three open air theatres with film. 

September 29 

Giveaways on wane as new season product is re- 
leased to theatres. 
September 30 

Poster exchanges forget protest action against dis- 
tributors as re- sale bans fizzle. 

Pacific National Theatres files restraint of trade 
action against Fox West Coast of Los Angeles, 
asking $780,000 damages. 



OCTOBER 



October I 

Glendale (Calif.) Capital Theatres files restraint of 
trade suit against Fox West Coast, asking $345,000 
damages, and includes eight distributor defendants 
in action. 

Large music publishers charged with exercising mon- 
opoly in suit filed by Richmond-Mayer Co. 
October 3 

Independents assuming operation of former circuit 
houses turned back to them demand protection in 
excess of that granted under circuit operation. Situ- 
ation halts selling and threatens new protection 
difficulties. 

Hiram S. Brown named chairman of board of General 
Pictures, Inc.. new producing-distributing organiza- 
tion developed by former Beacon executives. 

October 4 

Double featuring virtually eliminated in Chicago as 

ban becomes effective. 
October 5 

American Federation of Labor disavows Empire State 
Operators union, asking support be given Local 
306, New York. 

M-G-M, ending production of foreign versions, will 
do dubbing abroad. 

October 6 

Major electrics formulate new license agreement, 
hoping for ending of federal monopoly suit against 
them. 

October 10 

Canadian theatre taxes returned $5,130,000 from 900 
theatres in year, or average of $5,700 per theatre, 
survey reveals, 

October II 

Loew's completes deal for exclusive runs of United 
Artists product for 18 cities. 




A BOUQUET TO YOU 
SLIM SUMMERVILLE 
AND ZASU PITTSI 



With Roland Youns, Fifi D'Orsay, 
Verree Teasdale, C. Aubrey Smith, 
Henry Armetta, Cora Sue Collins' 
Screenplay by Gladys Lehman and 
H. M. Walker. Produced by Carl 
Laemmie, Jr., from a play by Cyril 
Harcourt. Directed by Edward Lud- 
wig. Presented by Carl Laemmle. 

w r IHHF 





For your perfectly delicious 
comedy art as the two ser- 
vants who were bequeathed 
millions of dollars in 

THEY JUIT 
HADteGET 
MARRIED 

You will make the world shake 
with real, wholesome laugh" 
ter and you will prove that you 
are the screen^s team of teamsl 



36 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



1932 YEAR OF OPERATING ECONOMIES 



October 12 

American Society of Cinematographers plans testing 
of all camera and projection equipment to obtain 
improvements. 

October 13 

W. N. Younpclaus brings new suit against major 
distributors at Lincoln, claiming injunction granted 
him earlier was broken and asking $255,000 damages. 

October 15 

AUied-M.P.T.O.A. joint meeting at Chicago reaffirms 
stand for federal legislation to correct industry 
complaints. 

October 18 

M-G-M will waive contract restrictions against double 
featuring its product in situations where policy is 
standard. 

October 19 

Decentralization of Publix southwest theatres ready 
as R. J. O'Donnell and W. C. Jenkins prepare to 
take over 26 Texas houses. 

October 21 

Vitaphone seeks injunction against Erpi over terri- 
torial licensing in new action filed at Wilmington. 

M-G-M will sell its short subjects on exclusive basis 
only at exhibitor's request. 

October 22 

Jesse Lasky completes deal for production of eight 

for Fox; leaves for coast. 
October 24 

S. R. Kent meets with exhibitor leaders for discussion 

of industry problems and their solution. 
October 26 

United Artists' exclusive run deal with Loew's ex- 
pected to be last one made by company, as oppo- 
sition to policy increases. 

John D. Clark resigns from Paramount to join Fox. 

October 27 

Neil Agnew named to succeed James Clark as Para- 
mount western division manager. 
October 28 

Hope of obtaining new standard contract approval 
through concerted exhibitor action seen as explana- 
tion of M.P.T.O.A.'s alignment with Allied on leg- 
islative program. 

Jules Levy, Radio general sales manager, says bene- 
fits of decentralized theatre operation are reflected 
in better film selling conditions. 

October 29 

Sam Katz resigns as president of Publix and director 
of Paramount in surprise move, following disagree- 
ment with management over theatre decentraliza- 
tion policy. 

Universal renews L. J. Schlaifer's contract as general 
sales manager two months in advance of expiration. 
October 31 

John Hertz, chairman of Paramount finance commit- 
tee, and Leo Spitz, executive and legal adviser, ex- 
pected to become ruling factors in Paramount fol- 
lowing withdrawal of Sam Katz. 

Paramount inaugurates selective run selling in Mem- 
phis. 



NOVEMBER 



November I 

John Hertz says all factional and political align- 
ments are out of Paramount as long as he remains. 

Indications plentiful that exclusive run selling is over 
for the year. 

November 2 

RCA ready to market new "High Fidelity" sound 

equipment. 
November 3 

Moe Mark, pioneer exhibitor, and William Morris, 

theatrical agency head, pass away. 
November 4 

Referee recommends dismissal of Harry Koplar re- 
ceivership suit against Skouras Bros. Enterprises, 
St. Louis. 

Charge made that A. T. & T., Western Electric and 
Erpi control 90 per cent of sound picture industry 
made by attorneys for Stanley Co., General Talking 
Pictures and Duovac Radio, seeking preliminary in- 
junction at Wilmington to end cross-licensing. 

November 5 

Majestic executive committee approves increase of 

negative costs. 
November 7 

Interpretation of Cleveland zoning agreement creates 
complications. 

E. W. Hammons advocates "decentralized" film buy- 
ing as next logical step following theatre decen- 
tralization. 

November 9 

Exhibitor meetings with S. R. Kent reach deadline. 
Lack of agreement on industry program at current 
conferences will mean pursuit of legislative program 
by exhibitors. Six major points of industry program 
advocated by Kent include an industry supreme 
court, or national appeals board, to settle industry 
differences. 



November 10 

Joint committee of Allied-M.P.T.O.A. continues work 

of drafting uniform contract. 
Fox will inaugurate flexible admission plan of selling 

with distribution of "Cavalcade." Flexible plan 

seen as favored over exclusive run selling. M. A. 

Lightman says exclusive runs are already dead. 

November 12 

Divestment of inter-company stock ownership seen as 
principal objective sought by government in ending 
monopoly suits against RCA and big electrics. 

November 15 

Clause in new standard contract limiting sale of 
shorts to moderate ratio with features seen effect- 
ing- reduction of short subject production. Completed 
draft of new standard contract being turned over 
to distributors by exhibitors. 

Warners sign Cleveland zoning agreement as last of 
circuits involved to ratify it, making pact wholly 
effective. 

November 16 

First draft of new standard contract and supplemen- 
tary proposals, including set-up of national appeal 
board, made public. Fox approves complete pro- 
gram. Paramount and United Artists representa- 
tives indicate they will approve. 

November 17 

RCA announces development of new types of re- 
producers. 

RKO theatre units effect $5,000,000 operating econ- 
omies. 
November 18 

Publix continues decentralization moves, with E. V. 
Richards taking over operation of Saenger unit 
and Nathan Goldstein acquiring former New Eng- 
land houses. 

Court restrains Los Angeles distributors from further 
operation of local zoning and protection plan, as 
constituted. 

November 19 

Academy votes annual acting and production awards 
to Helen Hayes, best actress and Fredric March, 
best actor. 

Paramount charters four new operating corporations 
for new corporate organization; thereby splitting 
management four ways. 

Consent decree ending Los Angeles zoning and pro- 
tection plan seen terminating suits against Fox 
West Coast, aggregating $3,000,000, is lived up to. 

November 21 

M-G-M, Paramount, Radio, Universal, Columbia and 
First Division expected to approve new standard 
contract. 

Department of Justice conducts investigation of trade 
practices at Kansas City as part of what is believed 
to be national probe of industry. 

November 22 

Joe Brandt resigns presidency of World Wide over 
difference with E. W. Hammons on executive policy. 

Government enters consent decree by which General 
Electric, Westinghouse and RCA agree to separate; 
ending action against big electrics. 

November 23 

Xalion-wide scrutiny of zoning and protection 

planned by Department of Justice. 
November 25 

Survey reveals 525 theatres reopened during two- 
month period ending Oct. 15. 
November 26 

Columbia rejects standard contract. With United Art- 
ists also rejecting and five distributors having made 
no decision, Fox and Educational- World Wide are 
sole distributors approving program as first national 
exhibitors' _ mass meeting opens in Chicago. 

Rockefeller interests get 100,000 additional shares of 
RKO common in adjustment of Radio City leases, 
making them largest individual shareholders in 
RKO. 

November 28 

First exhibitors' mass meeting to act on industry 
program opens at Chicago with divergence of ex- 
hibitor opinion in evidence over choice between it 
and federal legislation. 

November 29 

Chicago meeting develops Allied-M.P.T.O.A. split over 
exhibitor procedure; majority faction of meeting 
represented by Allied votes furtherance of legis- 
lative program for industry reforms; minority rep- 
resented by M.P.T.O.A. opposes move and supports 
industry program. 

Ned Depinet, vice-president and general distribution 
manager of Radio, has duties extended to include 
foreign with assignment of Frank 0''Heron, to post 
of New York representative at studio. 

November 30 

American Tri-Ergon's patent infringement suit against 
Paramount, first of several filed against large pro- 
ducers, opens in Brooklyn. 



DECEMBER 



December I 

Sam Kaplan, head of Local 306, New York operators' 
union, ousted with all officers of local by parent 
organization, the I.A.T.S.E. 



December 2 

New York mass meeting duplicates Chicago procedure 
with Allied majority favoring legislative relief and 
M.P.T.O.A. committed to continuing work of get- 
ting distributor approval of industry program. 
M.P.T.O.A. committee organizes for further con- 
tract and proposals conferences with distribution 
heads. 

James R. Grainger resigns as vice-president of Fox 
in charge of distribution. Sidney Kent names John 
D. Clark as Grainger's successor. 

Court denies motion for dismissal of indictments 
charging Sam Kaplan, ousted head of Local 306, 
and 16 other officers, with conspiracy and coercion. 

December 5 

Paramount, M-G-M and Radio approve new standard 
contract, making six companies favoring it: Fox, 
Universal and Educational- World Wide having ap- 
proved earlier. Action on appeals board deferred. 

Glenn Griswold resigns Fox vice-presidency to accept 
executive post in Paramount financial department. 

Wilmington court orders General Theatres Equip- 
rnent receiver not to proceed with proposed litiga- 
tion against former directors, investment houses 
and banks at this time. 

December 6 

Court awards RKO exclusive right to use Roxy name 
for new Radio City Theatre. 

Revised drafts of new standard contract incorporat- 
ing changes agreed on between distributors and 
M.P.T.O.A. committee submitted to distributors. 

Walter O. Burkey anti-trust suit against major dis- 
tributors and Film Board of Trade opens at Kan- 
sas City. 

December 9 

Senate action on Brookhart Bill delayed. 

Milton Feld and David Chatkin organize new theatre 

company following resignation from Publix due to 

decentralization of circuit. 
Fox develops new plan for selling company's product 

to 10-cent admission houses formerly ignored. 
December 12 

Federal Trade Commission drops appeal of Paramount 
block booking decision, ending 10 years of litiga- 
tion. 

December 13 

Sam Dembow named head of Publix Theatres. 
RCA announces policy of selling Photophone equip- 
ment outright; ending licensing arrangement. 
December 14 

Warner directorate win proxy fight at annual stock- 
holders' meet. 

Spyros Skouras withdraws from Fox-Roxy Theatre 
operating deal. 

Return of Comerford circuit by Publix, marking an- 
other major step in Publix decentralization, effec- 
tive soon. 

December 15 

Distributors discuss new plans for merger of physical 
distribution spurred on by need for economies. 

Warner proxy victory results in reelection of five of 
company's directorate. 

Paramount salary cuts aggregate $6,000,000, company 
reports. 

Detroit's double featuring ban collapses with all the- 
atres abandoning single policy. 
December 16 

$9,000,000 saving estimated by merger of physical 
distribution by sales heads preparing for further 
discussion of plan. 

December 17 

John Hertz says Paramount is prepared to face battle 
for business; gives reasons for confidence in com- 
pany's future. 

December 19 

Distributors consider plan for reducing number of 

exchange centers. 
Admission price reductions made by theatres in many 

cities. 
December 22 

S. R. Kent tells M.P.T.O. of North and South Caro- 
lina new standard contract will be in effect about 
Feb. 1. 

December 24 

Theatres aid needy throughout country by benefit 

performances and other contributions. 
December 27 

Move to keep admissions at 20-cent minimum level 

in evidence in major company sales policies. 
December 28 

Radio City Music Hall opens to brilliant audience. 
December 29 

Majestic franchise holders adopt recommendation of 
Phil Goldstone that production budget be deter- 
mined by story values. 

December 30 

B. B. Kahane reveals Radio plan to reduce produc- 
tion to 18 or 20 pictures with balance of program 
from independent units. David Selznick to be in 
charge. 

RKO Roxy Theatre, second Radio City theatrical 

unit, opens with pictures predominating. 
December 31 

Publix turns back Comerford circuit of 48 houses 
in 28 Pennsylvania cities. 



we Made The Two Greatest Box-Off fee Pictures Tot 
^he Exfiibftor /n^DRACUL/Kon^^/UiTE ZOMBiE' 

And Uerc Is The Third y 



BELA LUG OS I 



IK 



WITH 

ADRIENNE AMEf 
DAVID MANNERf 
ALEXANDER CARR 
VINCE BARNCTT 

Wftfi b<( EDWtN MARIN 



•mm 




,, 1 



1. % W 



ITjT full of THRILLS'/ 
ItJFULLOF PUN / 
irfFULLOFMYTTERY/ 
ITXFULLOFBIGNAHEf/ 




JACK 



38 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



lilli' 



liiiiii 



THEATRE RECEIPTS 



lliilliiill "' 



Theatre receipts for the calendar week ended December 31, 1932, reached an 
aggregate of $1,469,824 from 125 theatres in 20 major cities of the country. The 
total is an increase of $460,570 over the previous calendar week, ended December 24, 
when 106 theatres in 20 cities reported a total gross of $1,009,254, During the more 
recent seven-day period seven new low individual house records were noted. 

{Copyright, 1933: Reproduction of material from this department without credit to Motion Picture Herald expressly forbidden) 



Theatres 



Boston 





1,800 


30c -50c 


Keith's 


3,500 


30c-55c 


Keith -Boston .. 


2,900 


25c-55c 


Loew's Orpheum 


2.200 


2Sc-SSc 


Loew't State. . . 


3.700 


2Sc-S5c 


MetropoUtan . . 


4,350 


35c -65c 


Paramount .... 


1.800 


30c-50c 



Buffalo 

Buffalo 3,S00 

Century 3,000 

Erlanger 1,400 

Great Lakes .. 3,000 



Hippodrome 



2.100 



30c-6Sc 

25c 

50c-$1.50 
25c-40c 

2Sc 



Hollywood ..... 300 25c-40c 
Lafayette 3,300 25c 



Chicago 

Chicago 4.000 35c-68c 

McVickers .... 2,284 25c-S5c 

Oriental 3.940 3Sc-68c 

Palace 2,509 3Sc-7Sc 

Roosevelt 1,591 25c-55c 

State Lake .... 2,776 

United Artists. 1,700 35c-68c 

Cleveland 

Allen 3,300 lSc-35c 



Mall 753 15c-25c 

Ohio 1,500 50c-$1.50 



15c-40c 

25c -60c 



RKO Hippodrome 3,800 
RKO Palace ... 3,100 



State 3,400 23c-50c 

SttUman 1,900 25c-35c 

Warner's Lake. 800 15c-50c 

Denver 

Denham 1.700 15c-25c 

Denrer 2,500 25e-S0c 

Htiffmaii'8 Rialto 900 20c-40c 



Orplieuiii 2.600 25c-50c 

Paramount .... 2,000 25c-40c 



Defroit 

Downtown 



2,750 2SC-50C 



Fisher 2,700 25c-65c 

Fox 5.100 25c-50c 

Michigan 4,000 2Sc-75c 

Unit«d ArtistB. 2.000 25c-y5c 



Current Week 



Previous Week 



Picture 



Gross Picture 



"Virtue" (Col.) and 14,000 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 

"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 21,500 
(35c-50c) 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 22,000 
"Secrets of the French Police" (Radio) 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 21,000 

"Cynara" (U.A.) 22,500 



"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 39,000 

"Virtue" (Col.) and 16,500 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 



"Rockabye" (Radio) 22,000 

"Prosperity" (MGM) 6,000 

"The Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 9,300 

"You Said a Mouthful" (F. N.).. 9,700 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 5,900 



"Goona Goona" (First Div.) 2,900 

"Those We Love" (World Wide) 4,500 
(4 days) 

"Her Mad Night" (Mayfair) 3,000 

(3 days) 

"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 26,000 

"The Big Drive" (A. L. Rule).. 12,000 

(2nd week) 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 34,000 



"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 27,000 

"Island of Lost Souls" (Para.).. 11,000 

"The Mummy" (U.) 11,500 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 18,000 



"The Sport Parade" (Radio) and 4,500 
"Trailing the Killer" (World Wide) 

"The Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 15,000 

"He Learned About Women" 1,500 

(Para.) 

"The Unwritten Law" (Majestic" 7,500 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 12,000 
"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 
(25c. 40c) 

"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 18,000 

"Call Her Savage" (Fox) 7,000 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 6,500 



"Speed Demon" (Col.) 2,500 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 7,000 

(6 days) 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio)... 2,000 
(3 days) 

"Rackety Rax" (Fox) 1,500 

(4 days) 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 10,500 

"Payment Deferred" (MGM) 1,500 

(3 days) 

"Under-(>)ver Man" (Para.) 3,500 

(4 days) 



"Sport Parade" (Radio) 10,500 

(2 days) 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 
"Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 

(5 days) 
"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) 



"Me and My Gal" 
"Son-Daughter" (IV 
"Cynara" (U. A.) 



Gross 



"Me and My Gal" (Fox) and.... 13,000 

"Those We Love" (TiiTany) 

'Penguin Pool Murder" (Radio).. 19,500 

"Afraid to Talk" (U.) 20,000 

'Fast Life" (MGM) 20,000 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 21,000 



"Under-Cover Man" (Para.). 



36,000 



"Me and My Gal" (Fox) and.... 16,000 
"Those We Love" (Tiffany) 



"Under-Coyer Man" (Para.) . 
"Central Park" (F. N.) 



14,300 
5,100 



"The Conquerors" (Radio) 

(9 days) 

"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.). 

(4 days) 
"They Call It Sin" (F. N.) 

(3 days) 



8,900 
2,300 
2,100 



"Wild Girl" (Fox) 

(7 days) 
"The Thirteenth Guest" .. 

(3 days) (Monogram) 



"The Match King" (F. N.) 

(A. L. Rule). 



7,100 
2,000 

20,000 
15,000 
13,000 



"The Big Drive" 

(1st week) 
"Secrets of the French Police". 
(Radio) 



"The Sport Parade" (Radio) 22,500 

"They Call It Sin" (F. N.). 



10,000 



"The Crooked Circle" 

(World Wide) 

"The Penguin Pool Murder". 

(Radio) 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.). 



"Mr. Robinson Crusoe" (U. A.). 
"The Old Dark House" (U.)... 



"White Eagle" (Col.) and 

"Silver Lining" (Patrician) 
"You Said a Mouthful" (F. N.). 
(8 days) 

"The Golden West" (Fox) 

(3 days) 

"Big City Blues" (W. B.) 

(4 days) 

"Air Mail" (U.) 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 

(3 days) 

"Central Park" (F. N.) 

(4 days) 



"Goona Goona" (First Div.) and. 
"False Faces" (World Wide) 



I, 250 

' \7,m 

15,500 

4,300 
3,100 

3,000 

II, 000 

1,200 

1,300 

10,000 
1,500 

2,000 
7,500 



12,600 


"Faithless" (MGM) 




25,500 


"The Golden West" (Fox), 


. 12,500 


22,400 


"Fast Life" (MGM) 




9.200 


"Life Begins" (F. N.) and 

"Virgins of Bali" (Principal) 
(2nd week) 


. 6,700 



High and Low Gross 

(Tabulation covers period from January, 19J1 
to date) 



High 12-5 "Frankenstein" 

Low 3-25-32 "Explorers of the World". 

High 4-9-32 "Steady Company"....... 

Low 7-9-32 "By Whose Hand?" 

High 1-24 "Hell's Angels" 

Low 8-4-32 "Unashamed" 

High 6-18-32— 

"Hell Dirers" "Possessed" andl 
"Sin of Madelon Claudet" J 

Low 7-18 "Man in Possession" 

High 1-31 "No Limit" 

Low 7-4 "I Take This Woman" 



27,000 
16.000 
26,000 
16,500 
32.500 
18.000 



26.000 
19.000 
44,500 
30.000 



High 3-28 "My Past" 

Low 12-23-32 "Under-Cover 

High 2-14 "Omarron" , 

Low 12-9-32 "Rain" 



Man" 



39,500 

14,300 
25.600 
4,700 



High 8-8 "Politics" 35,100 

Low 11-25-32 "Night After Night" 7.800 

High 2-14 "Free Love" 26.300 

Low 7-16-32 "New Morals for Old" 4.200 



High 4-11 "Ten Cents a Dance".. 
Low 6-11-32 "The Secret Witness" 



24.100 
5.800 



High 1-23-32 "Two Kinds of Women". 67,000 

Low 12-22-32 "The Match King" 20,000 

High 2-7 "Doorway to Hell" 38,170 

Low 12-20-32 "The Big Drive" 15,000 

High 3-7 "My Past" 46,750 

Low 12-22-32 "Secrets of the French Police" 

13,000 

High 4-2-32 "Cheaters «t Play" 33,000 

Low 12-15-32 "False Faces" 14,000 

High 4-11 "Dishonored" 30,350 

Low 12-21-32 "They Call It Sin" 10,000 

High 12-12 "Frankenstein" 44,000 

Low 6-25-32 "Is My Face Red" 7,000 

High 3-21 "City Lights" 46,562 

Low 11-18-32 "Magic Night" 8,200 



High 1-30-32 "Hell Divers" 26,000 

Low 12-31-32 "Sport Parade" and ) 

"Trailing the KiUer" } 4,500 



High 5-2 "Laugh and Get Rich" 40,000 

Low 12-30-32 "Little Orphan Annie" 1 

and "Half Naked Truth" \ 12,000 

High 12-5 "Possessed" 30.000 

Low 6-20 "Vice Squad" 14,000 

High" ' io-V '"Five' s'ta'r' 'Kn'al". '.'.'. '.'.'.'.'.' lifiW 

Low 7-4 "Big Business Girl" 2,000 



High 8-8 "Politics" 25,000 

Low 11-30-32 "If I Had a Million".... 8,000 



High MO "Hell's Angels" 22.000 

Low 6-25-32 "Forgotten Command- 1 

ments" and "Reserred for Ladies"/ 3.450 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



39 



CTHCATCE CCCCIPTS — CCNT'Dl 



Theatres 



Current Week 



Previous Week 



High and Low Gross 



Picture 



Gross Picture 



Gross 



Hollywood 

Pantages 3,000 2Sc-40c 

W. B. Hollywood 3,000 25c-55c 

Indianapolis 

Apollo 1,100 SSc-SOc 

Circle 2,800 3Sc-S0c 

Indiana 3,300 35c-50c 

Lyric 2,000 35c-50c 

Palace 2,800 35c-50c 

Kansas City 

Liberty 1,000 lSc-25c 

Mainstreet 3,049 25c-40c 

Midland 4.000 25c-S0c 

Newman 2,000 2Sc-S0c 

Uptown 2,000 2Sc-40c 

Los Angeles 

Loew's State .. 2,416 25c-65c 

Paramount .... 3,596 35c-70c 

RKO 2,700 2Sc-S5c 

United Artists 2,000 25c-35c 

W. B. Downtown 2,400 25c-55c 

W. B. Western. 2,400 S5c-$1.6S 

Minneapolis 

Century 1.640 2Sc-40c 

Lyric 1.238 25c-40c 

ilKO Orpheum. 2,900 25c-55c 

Sate 2,300 25c-55c 

Montreal 

Capitol 2,547 2Sc-75c 

Imperial 1,914 15c-50c 

Loew't 3,115 25c-75c 

Palace 2.600 25c-75c 

Princess 2.272 25c-60c 

New York 

Astor 1,120 55c-$2.20 

Cameo 549 25c-75c 

Capitol 4,700 35c-$1.65 

Criterion 850 50c-$l-65 

Embassy 598 25c 

44th Street .... 1,482 25c-$1.10 

Hollywood 1,548 33c-99c 

Mayfair 2,300 35c-85c 

Palace 2,500 55c-$1.65 

Paramount .... 3,700 40c-$1.10 

Rialto 1,949 40c-$1.10 

RiToll 2,103 40c-$1.10 

Roxy 6,200 35c-$110 

Strand 3,000 35c-$1.10 

Winter Garden. 1,949 S5c-$1.10 



"Divorce in the Family" (MOM) 8,325 
"The Match King" (F. N.) 10,403 

"The Conquerors" (Radio) 3,000 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 6,000 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 11,000 

(35c -65c) 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 7,000 

"Fast Life" (MOM) 4,000 

"Age of Consent" (Radio) 2,000 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 5,000 
"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 9,(K)0 

(7 days and Sat. midnite show) * 

"Madame Butterfly" (Para.).... 6,000 
(6 days and Sat. midnite show) 

"You Said a Mouthful" (F. N.).. 3,200 



"Strange Interlude" (MGM) 16,213 

"Madame Butterfly" (Para.).... 29,000 

"Half Naked Truth" (Radio), and 6,300 
"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) 

"Divorce in the Family" (MGM) 3,910 

"Tlie Match King" (F. N.) 9,877 

"Central Park" (F. N.) 3,292 

(25c -5Sc) 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 4,500 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 2,000 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 12,000 
"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 

"Tess of the Storm Country" 7,500 

(Fox) 



"You Said a Mouthful" (F. N.).. 11,000 
and "They Call It Fate" (F. N.) 

"Shanghai Express" (Para.) and 3,000 
"Le (Jhien Jaune" (French) 

"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 13,000 

"Tess of the Storm Country" (Fox) 12,000 

"Frightened Lady" (British) and 7,500 
"Mischief" (British) 



"Rasputin and the Empress" 22,522 

(MGM) 

"Devil's Playground" (Principal) 3,550 

(8 days) 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 49,196 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 15,500 

(3rd week) 

All Newsreel 6,773 

"Maedchen in Uniform" 7,000 

(Krimsky & Cochran) (15th week) 

"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) 12,060 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 7,900 
"Penguin Pool Murder" (Radio) 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 14,000 

(6th week) 

"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 62,300 

"Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 13,500 

(4th week) 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 39,000 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 42,198 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 48,396 

"Afraid to Talk" (U.) 7,234 

(2nd week) 



"Prosperity" (MGM) 7,000 

"Central Park" (W. B.) 9,800 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio).. 3,000 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 5,000 

(4 days) 
"Follow the Leader" (Para.) 

(3 days) 

"No More Orchids" (Col.) 8,000 

"Men Are Such Fools" (Radio).. 7,000 

"Payment Deferred" (MGM) ... 4,500 



"The Most Dangerous Game" 2,300 

(Radio) 

"Payment Deferred" (MGM) .... 6,500 
(7 days and Sat. midnite show) 

"The Devil is Driving" (Para.).. 5,500 
(7 days and Sat. midnite show) 

"Life Begins" (F. N.) 4,900 

"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 10,700 

"He Learned About Women".... 17,000 
(Para.) 

"Penguin Pool Murder" (Radio). 6,500 

"Mr. Robinson Crusoe" (U. A.).. 8,000 

"Central Park" (F. N.) 9,400 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 6,900 
(4th week-5 days) 

"Evenings for Sale" (Para.) 4,000 

"Six Hours to Live" (Fox) 2,000 

"The Sport Parade" (Radio) 11,000 

"Rain" (U. A.) 6.000 



"Too Busy to Work" (Fox) and.. 9,000 
"Sherlock Holmes" (Fox) 

"Cendrillon de Paris" (French).. 1,800 
and "Le Fils de I'Autre" (French) 

"Faithless" (MGM) 10,000 

"Life Begins" (F. N.) 8,500 

"The Crusader" (Majestic) and.. 6,000 
"Hearts of Humanity" (Majestic) 



"Virgins of Bali" (Principal)... 2,900 

(2nd week) 

"Flesh" (MGM) 45,674 

(2nd week) 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).... 15,200 

(2nd week) 

All Newsreel 5,893 

"Maedchen in Uniform" 4,500 

(Krimsky & Cochran) (14th week) 

"The Sport Parade" (Radio) 9,000 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 8,700 

(5th week) 

"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.).. 35,200 

(8 days) 

"Sign of the Cross" (Para.).... 13,100 
(3rd week) 

"If I Had a Million" (Para.).... 14,500 

(3rd week-8 days) 

"Man Against Woman" (Col.).... 23,000 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 18,974 

(2nd week) 

"Afraid to Talk" (U.) 9,513 

(1st week) 



(Tabulation covers period from January, 1931 
to date) 



High 4-30-32 "Careless Lady" 22,400 

Low 12-7-32 "Rain" 6,300 

High 2-7 "Little Caesar" 30,000 

Low 11-7 "Honor of the Family" 7,000 

High 6-13 "Daddy Long Legs" 10,000 

Low 8-20-32 "Jewel Robbery" 2,500 

High 2-14 "Cimarron" 13,000 

Low 7-30-32 "Westward Passage" 3,500 

High 1-17 "Her Man" 25,000 

Low 9-10-32 "Bring 'Em Back AIItc".. 5,000 

High S-2 "Trader Horn" 22,000 

Low 12-30-32 "Fast Life" 4,000 

High 1-9-32 "Peach o' Reno" Xi.SOO 

Low 12-29-32 "Little Orphan Annie" 1 

and "The Half Naked Truth" J 5,000 

High 1-23-32 "Hell Dirers" 30,400 

Low 12-8-32 "Man Against Woman"... 6,000 

High 2-27-32 "Shanghai Express" 25,000 

Low 12-8-32 "Evenings for Sale" 5,000 

High 1-10 "Giri of the (Jolden West" 8,000 

Low 5-21-32 "Lena Rivers" 2.000 

High 10-25 "Susan Lenox" 39,000 

Low 3-5-32 "The Silent Witness" 6,963 

High 10-31 "Beloved Bachelor" 41,000 

Low 2-6-32 "Tomorrow and Tomorrow" 7,500 

High 9-26 "Monkey Business" 32,000 

Low 2-6-32 "Sky Devils" 3,000 

High 2-7 "Little Caesar" 27,000 

Low 4-23-32 "Destry Rides Again" 6,200 

High ' '5-36' "kiki"'.'.'.'." '. ; '. V. r. .". ' '4,000 

Low 1-24 "Men on Call" 1,200 

High 12-14 "Cimarron" 30,000 

Low 12-24-32 "The Sport Parade" 11,000 

High 1-2-32 "Sooky" 10,000 

Low 12-24-32 "Rain" 6,000 

High 1-10 "Just Imagine" 18,000 

Low 12-23 ''The Guardsman" and 1 

"The Tip-Off"/ 8,000 

High 1-17 "Office Wife" 10,000 

Low 12-23-32 "Cendrillon de Paris" ) 

and "Le Fils de I'Autre" ( 1,800 

High 4-2-32 "Fireman, Sare My Child" 16,500 

Low 7-18 "Stepping Out" 9,000 

High 4-2-32 "One Hour With You"... 19,500 

Low 12-23-32 "Life Begins" 8.500 

High 4-1 "City Lights'* 22,500 

Low 12-23-32 "The Crusader" and ) 

and "Hearts of Humanity" ) 6,000 

High 1-2-32 "Hell Divers" 24,216 

Low 11-14 "The Champ" 18,759 

High 1-9-32 "Mata Hari" 110,466 

Low 7-2-32 "New Morals for Old" 29,767 

High 1-3 "Reaching for the Moon" 22,675 

Low 5-24-.30 "Silent Enemy" 10,800 

High 1-3 Newsreels 9,727 

Low 11-3-32 Newsreels 5,200 

High 12-12 "Frankenstein" 53,800 

Low 4-30-32 "Cohens and Kellys in Hol- 
lywood 7,600 

High 2-7 "Finn and Hattie" 85.900 

Low 12-23-32 "The Devil Is Driving".. 35,200 

High 2-27-32 "Shanghai Express" 64,600 

Low 6-27 "Dracula" and J 

, "Hell's Angels" f 4.SOO 

High 1-9-32 "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" 67,10(» 

Low 7-29-32 "Igloo" s',(m 

High 1-1-32 "Delicious" 133,000 

Low 12-22-32 "Man Against Woman".. 23,000 

High 1-17 "Little Caesar" 74,8J1 

Low 4-2-32 "The Missing Rembrandt" 8,012 

High 9-19 "Fire Star Final" 59,782 

Low 8-2032 "Hollywood Speaks" 5,69t 



40 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



[THEATRE CECEIPT$"C€NT»D1 



Theatres 



Current Week 



Picture 



Gross 



Oklahoma City 

Capitol 1,200 lOc-SSc 

Criterion 1,700 lOc-SSc 

Liberty 1,500 10c-35c 

Mid-West 1,500 10c-5Sc 

Omaha 

Orpheum 3,000 25c-55c 



Paramount 



2,900 2Sc-50c 



State 1,200 2Sc 

World 2,500 25c-40c 

Philadelphia 

Aldine 1,300 50c-$1.50 

Arcadia 600 30c-55c 

Boyd 2,400 3Sc-7Sc 

Earle 2,000 40c-65c 

Fox 3,000 35c-7Sc 

Karlton 1,000 30c-55c 

Stanley 3,700 3Sc-7Sc 

Stanton 1,700 35c-55c 

Portland, Ore. 

Fox Broadway.. 1,912 25c-6Sc 

Fox Liberty .... 1,800 15c-25c 

Oriental 2,040 25c-3Sc 

RKO Orpheum 1,700 25c-S5c 

United Artists . 945 25c-35c 

San Francisco 

Filmarte 1,400 25c-50c 

Geary 1,551 25c-85c 

Golden Gate ... 2,800 25c-65c 

Paramount .... 2,670 25c-7Sc 

United Artists. .1.200 25c-SSc 

Warfield 2,700 35c-90c 

Warner Bros. .. 1,380 35c-75c 

Seattle 

Fifth Avenue .. 2,750 25c- 55c 

Liberty ....... 2,000 10c-25c 



Music Box 



950 25c-S0c 



Paramount 3,050 2Sc-75c 

Washington 

ColwDbia 1,232 25c-40c 

Earle 2,323 25c-66c 

Fox 3,434 2Sc-66c 

LoeVa Palace.. 2,363 35c-55c 

Metropolitan .. 1,600 25c-55c 

Rialto 1,900 25c-55c 

RKO Kettk's... 1,832 25c-55c 



"Madame Butterfly" (Para.).. 
(10c-40c) 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 



"Thirteenth Guest" (Monogram) 
(4 days) 

"That's My Boy" (Col.) 

(3 days) 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 



3,500 
5,203 
1,403 
1,100 
6,000 



"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 6,500 
"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 

(5 days) (25c-40) 
"Penguin Fool Murder" (Radio) 

(3 days) 
"A Successful Calamity" (W. B 

(3 days) 
"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.) 

(7 days) 
"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) .. 

(4 days) 

"Follow the Leader" (Para.) — 
(5 days) 

"Cabin in the Cotton" (F. N.) and 
"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 



8,250 
2,200 
7,750 
800 
1,200 
6,250 



"The Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 11,000 

"Prosperity" (MGM) ■ 4,000 

(8 days) 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 9,000 

(5 days) 

"Central Park" (F. N.) 15,000 

(6 days) 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 23,000 

(6 days) 

"He Learned About Women".... 4,500 
(Para.) (7 days) 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 13.000 

(6 days) 

"Mask of Fu Manchu" (MGM).. 9,000 
(6 days) (30c-55c) 



"Flesh" (MGM) 12,500 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 1,000 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio).. 2,003 
(4 days) 

"Trouble in Paradise" (Para.).... 1,500 
(3 days) 

"Rockabye" (Radio) 10,000 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 4,500 



"A. Nous La Liberte" (Foreign).. 800 

"Maedchen in Uniform" 9,500 

(Krimsky & Cochran) 

"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 17,030 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 16,000 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 20,000 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 14,000 

"He Learned About Women" 3,500 

(Para.) 



"Wild Horse Mesa" (Para.) and 6,500 
"Handle With Care" (Fox) 

"Texas Bad Man" (U.) 5.000 

"Trouble in Paradise" (Para.).... 4,500 

"Flesh" (MGM) 8.500 

(25c-55c) 

"Rackety Rax" (Fox) 2,875 

"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) 18,000 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 28,500 

"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 11,200 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 9,250 

"The Mummy" (U.) 10,000 

(5 days) 

"The Sport Parade" (Radio).... 2,200 
(3 days) 

"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 5,000 
(5 days) 



Previous Week 

Picture Gross 



"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.) 3,000 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 4,900 

"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 1,000 

(4 days) 

"Central Park" (F. N.) 1,000 

(3 days) 

"They Call It Sin" (F. N.) 3,000 



"Rain" (U. A.) 



5,500 



600 



"Tiger Shark" (F. N.) 

(3 days) 

"Evenings for Sale" (Para.) 400 

(2 days) 

"Mr. Robinson Crusoe" (U. A.).. 5,750 
and "Six Hours to Live" (Fox) 



"Night After Night" (Para.) 2,300 

(6 days) 

"If I Had a Million" (Para.).... 12,000 
(6 days) 

"Hell's Highway" (Radio) 13,000 

(6 days) 

"Uptown New York" 17,000 

(World Wide) (6 days) 

"Virtue" (Col.) 3,000 

(6 days) 

"Evenings for Sale" (Para.) 11,000 

(6 days) 

"The Sport Parade" (Radio) 8,500 

(6 days) 



"The Mask of Fu Manchu".... 12,000 
(MGM) 

"Under-Cover Man" (Pa'ra.) 1,000 

"This Sporting Age" (Col.) 3,000 



"Six Hours to Live" (Fox) 3,500 

"The Inn at the Rhine" (Foreign) 1,100 

"No More Orchids" (Col.) 14,500 

"If I Had a Million" (Para.).... 15,300 

(TifTany) 8,000 

(Para.) 14,000 

They Call It Sin" (F. N.) 4,000 



"The Last Mile'^ 

(10 days) 
"Under-Cover Man' 



"The Mask of Fu Manchu" .... 7,000 
(MGM) and "Evenings for Sale" 
(Para.) 

"Hell's House" (Zeldman) 2,000 

(4 days) 

"Out of Singapore" (Goldsmith).. 1.800 
(4 days) 

"They Call It Sin" (F. N.).... 2,000 

(5 days) 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio).. 2,250 
(4 days) 

"If I Had a Million" (Para.).... 9,000 



"Uptown New York" (World Wide) 2,500 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 15,500 

"Night After Night" (Para.).... 19,750 

"Red Dust" (MGM) 11,250 

(2nd week) 

"Scarlet Dawn" (W. B.) 4,500 

(6V2 days) 



"The Unwritten Law" (Majestic) 4,500 
(6 days) 



High and Low Gross 

(Tabulation covers period from January, 1931 
to date) 



High 2-7 "Illicit" 11,000 

Low 12-24-32 "Tbe Devil Is Driving".. 3,000 

High 2-21 "Cimarron" 15,500 

Low 8-1-32 "Downstairs" 3,000 

High 1-24 "Under Suspicion" 7,200 

Low 6-20 "Big Fight" and 1 

"Drums of Jeopardy" J 900 

High 9-19 "Young As You Feel" 11,000 

Low 12-24-32 "They Call It Sin" 3,000 

High 2-14 "Cimarron" 25,550 

Low 6-18-32 "Night World" 8,500 

High 4-23-32 "Tarzan, the Ape Man". 13,750 
Low 5-21-32 "Wet Parade" and "It's \ 

Tough to Be Famous J 4,000 

High 3-14 "Trader Horn" 10.000 

Low 11-18-32 "Faithless and ] 

"The Painted Lady" S 1.100 

High 4-11 "Men Call It Lore" 16,000 

Low 11-28 "The Cisco Kid" 4,500 

High' 12-17 "the Guardsman" .' '. '. 'e.'sOO 

Low 10-1-32 "Make Me a Star" 1.500 

High 1-2-32 "Makers of Men" 27,000 

Low 7-23-32 "Miss Pinkerton" 12,500 

High 2-7 "Man Who Came Back" 40,000 

Low 6-18-32 "Mystery Ranch" 15,000 

High 5-2 "City Lights" 8,000 

Low 11-24-32 "Cabin in the Cotton" I 

and "Age of Consent" f 2,800 

High 12-19 "Frankenstein" 31,000 

Low 7-25 "Rebound" 8,000 

High 3-21 "Last Parade" 16,500 

Low 11-17-32 "All American" 6,000 

High 1-10 "Min and Bill" 21,000 

Low 10-1-32 "The Crash" 2,800 

High 2-14 "Cimarron" 20,000 

Low 11-23-32 "The Old Dark House".. 4,700 

High 1-10 "Hell's Angels" 12,500 

Low 11-2-32 "Payment Deferred" 1,900 

High 8-4-25 "Bring 'Em Back Alive".. 24,000 

Low 6-11-32 "Lena Hirers" 7,000 

High 1-9-32 "The Champ" 35.600 

Low 8-12-32 "Deril and the Deep" 9,500 

High 3-14 "Parior, Bedroom and Bath" 28,000 

Low 12-29-32 "Handle With Care" 14,000 

High 3-26-32 "Fireman, Sare My Child" 19,000 

Low 12-29-32 "He Learned About Women" 3,500 



High 7-30-32 "Milion Dollar Legs" 18,500 

Low 12-30-32 "Wild Horse Mesa" and) 

"Handle With Care" ) 6,500- 

High 1-10 "The Lash" 11,500 

Low 11-11-32 "Amazon Head Hunters" 3.000 

High 2-28 "City Lights" 14,000 

Low 11-25-32 "The Crooked Circle".. 3,000 



High MO "Paid" 18,000 

Low 4-9-32 "No One Man" and.. ] 

"Devil's Lottery" f 7,000 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTU RE HERALD 



41 



WARNING 



PAY no money to men 
representing them- 
selves as solicitors of sub- 
scriptions to THE FILM 
DAILY. 

THE FILM DAILY 
does NOT employ sub- 
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To subscribe to THE 
FILM DAILY SERV- 
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Subscription Price $10.00 

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Relative business done In nnotlon picture theatres In the week preceding 
Christmas In 1932 and 1931 Is shown In the graph, based upon Motion Picture 
Herald's weekly compilation of box office receipts. The vertical white bar 
represents the gross in each city for the week ending December 17 in each year, 
as the 100 per cent starting point for the comparison. The gross for the week 
ended December 24 In 1931 is shown by the shaded bar, and the receipts for the 
same week In the vear lust closed are olctured with the black bar. 



HIGH SCHOOLS TO VIEW 
FOREIGN-MADE FILMS 



International Cinenna League 
Gets Non-Theatrical Distribu- 
tion Rights for 85 Per Cent of 
Foreign Talkers Shown in U. S. 

Entrance of the International Cinema 
League into the rapidly developing educa- 
tional film movement is expected to lead to 
an expansion of the foreign motion picture 
market in the United States. Formed to 
serve as a central, authoritative source of 
European pictures for schools and colleges, 
the League successfully has negotiated non- 
theatrical distribution rights for about 85 
per cent of the foreign talking pictures 
shown in this country. Product of a num- 
ber of importers and independent distribu- 
tors has been obtained, including foreign 
releases of Protex-Ufa, Tobis Forenfilms 
(except in California) ; Capital Foreign 
Attractions, Institut fur Kulturforschung, 
J. H. Hoffberg and Julie Elias. 

Cooperation with the Board of Education 
in New York, recently announced by Ed- 
ward B. Ginsburg, director of the League, 
has resulted in a program of special Satur- 
day morning showings for high school and 
junior high school students. Three experi- 
mental Saturday morning screenings held 
thus far have been attended by some 6,000 
students representing schools throughout 
Greater New York. Students paid to see 
the pictures, which were in German, French 
and Spanish and were exhibited under the 
joint sponsorship of the Department of 
Modern Languages of New York's Board 
of Education and the International Cinema 
League. 

Special monthly showings in each lan- 



guage are to be held in 10 key school dis- 
tricts throughout the city. Not only will 
films of purely pedagogical interest be dis- 
tributed, but also selected European theatri- 
cal films which are both entertaining and 
convey the flavor of European life and 
customs. 

A direct tieup is made in the course with 
the pictures seen by students, in that respect 
placing the program in a category not un- 
like that of a similar project now being 
conducted among 10,000 high school stu- 
dents under the direction of the National 
Council of Teachers of English. In this 
case, however, the interest is primarily the 
study of languages, with the added oppor- 
portunity of acquiring some knowledge of 
Continental cities. 

Members of the Board of Education in 
New York review foreign pictures made 
available through the League and select 
certain productions to be seen by the stu- 
dents in foreign language courses. The 
rating of pictures thus made in the East 
will, it is expected, later be adapted to the 
entire country and extra-curricular show- 
ings will be held regularly under the direc- 
tion of the school authorities in key cities. 
That the New York reviewers will have a 
sufficient number of pictures from which to 
choose is practically assured through the 
League's list of 60 to 70 foreign films that 
it has available through member companies. 

The foreign film market thus far has to 
overcome the language handicap which 
came through sound, but it is expected that 
vvith the growth of reproducing installa- 
tions in educational institutions the demand 
for European pictures will increase accord- 
ingly. To date, foreign film sales have been 
confined to the socalled "little theatre" di- 
vision, except in a few instances. 



42 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 





€N THE 
D€TTED LINE. 



San Marcos, Texas 

DEAR HERALD: 

Another Christmas and we are sixteen hun- 
dred miles from our base of supplies, and there 
isn't a chimney in Texas where we could hang 
up our sock. Down here they all use gas 
stoves. 

Our old friend Zimmerman has invited us 
out to his house for a turkey dinner today and 
after that we are to play a round of golf. 
Think of it, Oscar, golf on Christmas day. 
We have this satisfaction on being away from 
home on Christmas, however, we won't hear 
our wife say, "Hey, there, you go down in 
the furnace room and stoke that furnace and 
carry out the ashes." 

There are two things we thoroughly enjoy 
(we don't think) : Carrying out ashes and beat- 
ing rugs, and next to those comes three or 
four more rugs. 

Everytime Christmas comes around we won- 
der if that Santa Claus myth is really a good 
thing when we think of the thousands of poor 
kids who will be expecting Santa to visit them 
only to be disappointed. If we had a million 
dollars we'd be glad to spend all of it to buy 
a little Christmas cheer for those poor unfor- 
tunate children who never saw Santa. Down in 
the Rio Grande valley we saw little Mexican 
children running around barefooted in the mud 
and slush. They have heard of Santa, no 
doubt, but have never seen him, and the re- 
membrance of the condition of these poor chil- 
dren makes Christmas a rather sad day for 
us. But on the other hand we remember that 
"Unto us a Christ is born, unto us a Savior 
given" and this should make all men rejoice. 

One of our regrets is that last night we were 
not where we could slip something into the 
stockings of Bennie and Catherine and Billy 
and Joline, but then, no doubt, Meryl and Flor- 
ence and Walt and Marjorie will look after 
that, and then we expect grandma and Ruth 
to have a hand in that also. 

V 

Down in Brownsville the other day a couple 
of colored fellows met on the street and one 
said to the other, "Say, Sam, wha,t kind of a 
clock was dat yo wife dun brung home the 
other day, huh?" And Sam replied, "Well, 
Mose, dat am what da calls a eight-day clock, 
and Ah specks hit am, kaze Ah dun winds hit 
twice a day now fo eight days." 

V 

To read all those familiar names in "What 
the Picture Did for Me" is just like getting 
letters from home. We know about every one 
of them west of Pennsylvania personally, and 
every name calls to mind something familiar. 
For instance, there's Mayme P. Musselman of 
the Princess theatre at Lincoln, Kansas. She's 
the star cook of the Sunflower state and the 
mother of that little girl who went to sleep on 
our lap watching Tom Mix do his stuff. Then 
there is Horn & Morgan of Hay Springs, 
Nebraska, that's Where they raise the big 
potatoes. 

S. H. Rich of the Rich theatre at Mont- 
pelier, Idaho, gets in with some reports. We 
remember S. H. and his Rich theatre, they are 
both right up to date. A. E. Handcock of the 
Columbia theatre at Columbia City, Indiana, 
is another contributor. The Ohio and Indiana 
state line splits Columbia City right in two. 
A. E. bought us a coca cola when we were 
there last summer. Thanks, old timer. We 
note that Gerald Stettmund of Chandler, Okla- 
homa, kept his promise and sent in some 
reports. This is a surprise to us for it's the 
first time he was ever known to keep a 
promise. 

In commenting on one picture, Don Monroe 
of the State theatre at Lincoln, Nebraska, cer- 
tainly handed us a laugh when he said that the 
reviewer of the picture in Liberty who gave the 
picture four stars must have been hit on the 



head with a hammer for he saw three stars too 
many. Leave it to Don, he can tell 'em. Our 
experience has been that when a fan magazine 
reviewer gives a picture four stars it would 
be wise for the exhibitor to examine it with 
both eyes before booking it. 

There is one good thing that department has 
done if nothing else, it has awakened Walt 
Bradley, that lazy son-in-law of ours at 
Neligh, Nebraska, and that's sumpin'. We 
didn't suppose dynamite would do that. 

There are several thousand of other familiar 
names we hope to see in that department. May- 
be they will come later on; we hope they do. 
V 

Well, we had that turkey dinner and then 
that golf game. We were the star performer 
at that dinner, but when we got on the golf 
course that guy Zim made a monkey and two 
baboons out of us and then laughed at us, and 
there was no darn sense in a fella treating a 
friend that way. 

After the game we went back to Zim's 
house and finished what was left of that 
turkey. Zim beat some eggs up into a froth 
and put something into it that was hardly in 
line with the 18th Amendment and told us it 
was a special preparation of his for weak- 
minded people. He suggested that we take 
three doses of it. Then he said, "You know, 
Jaysee, that I'm a Democrat." We stopped 
him right there and said, "Well, you don't 
need to say that, anybody would know that from 
looking at you." 

Well, it was a good dinner and a good golf 
game, and with these delightful people our 
Christmas was not so dull even though we 
were sixteen hundred miles from home. 
V 

At Gonzales we met Mr. and Mrs. Lynn 
Smith who operate the Princess theatre, two 
delightful folks who seemed to be pleased that 
we called. They invited us to come back and 
spend the night with them, and we may do 
it, for we know there would be a most delight- 
ful evening in store for us. It's a real pleasure 
to meet such folks. In fact, most of these 
Texas people are like that. 

H. G. Stein of the Princess theatre at Luling 
also wants us to come back when we can stay 
longer. He wants to have a game of golf with 
us, but these Longhorns have made a monkey 
out of us long enough. We've put our clubs 

away for the winter, and so 

We're heading north where blizzards 
blow. 

Where the streets are covered up with 
snow. 

No matter if it's snowing. 
So let it snow to beat the Dutch, 
For we don't mind the snow so much, 
For it's HOME, that's where we're 
going. 

J. C. JENKINS, 
The HERALD Man 



THE 



NEW 



DEAL 



SPECIAL FEATURES 
of the new 

SILENT AUTOMATIC TICKET REGISTER 

ABSOLUTELY NOISELESS IN OPERATION. 
GREATER SPEED IN SELLING TICKETS. 
SELF-SHARPENING KNIVES. 
DOUBLE TICKET CAPACITY. 

TICKETS CANNOT JAM. TEAR OR CUT SHORT. 

NO REPAIRS TO WORRY ABOUT. 

BONDED GUARANTEE OF RESPONSIBILITY 

A QUALITY BARGAIN — DISTINCTIVE and DIFFERENT 



TICKET REGISTER CORP. 



Columbia 

Lillian Bond in "Fever," Clarence Badger 
directing. . . . Raquel Torres in "Tampico." . . . 
J. Carol Maish and Wheeler Oakman in "The 
Brand Inspector." . . . Cecelia Parker in "Lost 
Valley." . . . Barbara Weeks and Mathew Betz 
in "State Trooper," D. Ross Lederman, direct- 
ing. 

V 

Fox 

Una O'Connor and Merle Tottenham, British 
actresses, sign term contracts. . . . Ralph Mor- 
gan in "Road to Heaven," John Francis Dil- 
lon to direct. . . . William Dieterle to direct 
"Princess at Your Door." . . . Harry Lachman 
to direct picture, as yet untitled. . . . Paul Mar- 
tin, director and Josef Strassner, costume de- 
signer, signed. . . . 

V 

MGM 

Lee Tracy signs term contract ; to appear in 
"Clear All Wires." ... 

V 

Paramount 

Lloyd Hamilton and Majorie Beebe in "His 
Perfect Day" (short), Clyde Bruckmaji di- 
recting. . . . Sir Guy Standing in "The Story 
of Temple Darke." . . . Colonel Stoopnagle and 
Budd in "International House." . . . Herman J. 
Mankiewicz signed to supervise "Cracked Ice," 
Norman McLeod to direct. . . . John Lodge, 
Gail Patrick and Randolph Scott in "Murder 
at the Zoo," Edward Sutherland to direct. . . . 
Kathleen Burke signs term contract. . . . Verna 
Hillie, John Lodge and Norma Mitchell join 
"The Woman Accused." ... 

V 

RKO Radio 

Mrs. Wallace Reid in "Diamond Cut Dia- 
mond." . . . Florence Eldridge, Robert Emmet 
O'Connor and Walter Walker in "The Great 
Jasper." . . . 

V 

Universal 

Anita Page in "The Big Cage," Burt Neu- 
mann directing. . . . 

V 

Warner-First National 

Edward G. Robinson in "Big Shot." . . . Kay 
Strozzi and Bette Davis in "Ex-Lady," Robert 
Florey to direct. . . . Alice White in "Picture 
Snatcher," Lloyd Bacon to direct. . . . 



To Produce 24 in Mexico 

Jose Bohr, actor and director, is in 
Mexico City from Hollywood with sound 
equipment. He plans to make 24 feature 
talking pictures in Spanish during 1933, 
seven of which will be placed in prepara- 
tion in January. English version will be 
made of several of the features. 



Plan New Exchange 

Harvey Raden has formed Galub Amuse- 
ment Company, Inc., in association with 
Charles S. Levin and plans to open an ex- 
change in New York. Mr. Levin is former 
secretary of the Fox Film Corporation. Mr. 
Raden operates the Acme theatre on Four- 
teenth street. 



1600 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Shores Opens New York Plant 

Lynn Shores, well known producer and 
director, has established the West Coast 
Service Studios, Inc., at 510 West_ 57th 
street. New York, offering service in all 
types of production work. An RCA Photo- 
phone licensee, the studio has installed RCA 
Victor "High Fidelity" recording apparatus. 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



43 




W^iAT THE MCTUCE 
DID FDD ME 




Columbia 



FORBIDDEN TRAIL: Buck Jones— Jones doesn't 
drive them out of the theatre after you get a couple 
of them in to see his show but it certainly is 
poison for me to try to run a show with a western 
"shoot-em-up feature." They just don't want to pay 
money to see that kind of a story.— Charles Lee Hyde, 
Grand Theatre, Pierre, S. Dakota. Small town 
patronage. 

THE NIGHT CLUB LADY: Adolphe Menjou and 
Mayo Methot — Good murder mystery. Played Dec. 
i3.i4._C. M. Hartman. Liberty Theatre, Carnegie, 
Okla. Small town patronage. 

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND: Lee Tracy 
and Constance Cummings — A great picture that 
pleased those I could get in to see it. Poor business. 
Tried to get a date before election but by the time 
I got it politics had cooled off. Played Dec. 8-9.— 
C. M. Hartman, Liberty Theatre, Carnegie, Okla. 
Small town patronage. 



First National 



CABIN IN THE COTTON: Richard Barthlemess— 
This is a very pleasing picture, but not as big as 
I thought it would be. Did a little above average 
business. Played Dec. 14-15.— Tom Edwards, Ozark 
Theatre, Eldon, Mo. Small town patronage. 

DOCTOR X: Lionel AtwiU and Fay Wray— One 
of the best of the shocker mystery pictures. Insist 
on getting the color print, as it is much better than 
the black and white. This picture drew good business 
for two days and pleased. After some of the mystery 
pictures we had run ahead of this one that is in- 
deed surprising. Running time, 77 minutes. — S. M. 
Farrar, Orpheum Theatre, Harrisburg, 111. Small 
town patronage. 



Fox 



AMATEUR DADDY: Warner Baxter, Marion Nixon 
— Swell picture which pleased everyone. Better thaii 
"Daddy Long Legs." Looks like Marion Nixon is 
getting as popular as Janet Gaynor. She is here. 
Played Nov. 30-Dec. 1.— Bob Wlygant, Heights The- 
atre, Houston, Texas. Small town patronage. 

CALL HER SAVAGE: Clara Bow— Wbat mar- 
velous comeback this great little star has made. 
It's a swell picture and your patrons will like it. 
I played it a few days before Christmas and failed 
to get them in. Am going through the usual fire. 
Christmas slump in business and this year it's very 
bad. Played Dec. 19-20.— R. W. Heckman, Lyric 
Theatre, Greenville, 111. Small town patronage. 

CHANDU, THE MAGICIAN: Edmund Lowe and 
Irene Ware— For those under 15 years and all those 
who read detective and mystery stories, this is the 
best picture ever made. If you can pick your 
crowd, this will go big. One sure thing is that the 
kids will eat it up. It did not draw for us even 
though our local radio station had broadcast this 
feature for months each day. 1 have yet to run a 
picture with a radio tieup and get results. Played 
Dec. 21-22. Running time, 71 minutes.— S. M. Far- 
rar, Orpheum Theatre, Harrisburg, HI. Small town 
patronage. 

CHANDU, THE MAGICIAN: Edmund Lowe- 
Good picture of its kind to poor business. Played 
Dec. 6-7.— C. M. Hartman, Liberty Theatre, Carnegie, 
Okla. Small town patronage. 

CONGORILLA: (Mr. and Mrs. Martin Johnson)— 
Pulled like a last year's mustard plaster, but those 
who came seemed to like it. Played it too close to 
another of the same type. Business i>oor. Okay for 
kids and ought to pull in many communities.— 
M. R. Harrington, State Theatre, Portland, Oregon. 
Suburban patronage. 

DOWN TO EARTH: Will Rogers— This star 
means nothing to our patrons and this is not his 
best picture. Business just average and film rental 
far too high. Okay for kids, but adults were not too 
enthusiastic— M. R. Harrington .State Theatre, Port- 
land, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

DOWN TO EARTH: Will Rogers— Drew well for 
three days and we all considered it one of Roger's 
best. Not as funny as some of the others, but it is 
jammed with good common horse sense and enter- 
tainment. — M. W. Lamour, National Theatre, Gra- 
ham, Texas. Small town patronage. 

DOWN TO EARTH: Will Rogers— Drew a bit 
better than usual and very well liked. Made all of 
us feel a little better. Played Dec. 4-5. — Elaine S. 
Furlong, Star Theatre, Heppner, Oregon. Small 
town patronage. 



N this, the exhibitor's own de- 
partment, the theatremen of the 
nation serve one another with in- 
formation on the box office per- 
formance of product for their mu- 
tual benefit. It is a service of the 
exhibitor for the exhibitor. Address 
all communications to — 

What the Picture Did for Me 

MOTION PICTURE HERALD 
1790 Broadway, New York 



THE FIRST YEAR: Janet Gaynor and Charles 
Farrell — This one pulled and pleased so that's that. 
Okay for family trade.— M. R. Harrington, State 
Theatre, Portland, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

THE FIRST YEAR: Janet Gaynor and Charles 
Farrell — Wrong kind of picture for Gaynor- Farrell. 
Just average box office. Did not please. Too much 
fussing. People like those two in sweet, clean 
romances. — M. W. Larmour, National Theatre, Gra- 
ham, Texas. Small town patronage. 

THE GOLDEN WEST: George O'Brien— A high 
class western that is good for Sunday or any day 
and it will please all. The acting is good and the 
get up of the picture is fine in places, but the director 
slipped in some places by using shots that were 
taken some other time and the people didn't match 
with the later scenes. The audience will hardly 
note it. Played Nov. 27-28. Running time, 74 
minutes.— G. N. Turner, Family Theatre, Pine City, 
Minn. Small town patronage. 

HAT CHECK GIRL: Sally Filers and Ben Lyon— 
Exceedingly clever comedy drama. — M. W. Larmour, 
National Theatre, Graham, Texas. Small town patron- 
age. 

ME AND MY GIRL: Spencer Tracy and Joan 
Bennett— The poorest Fox picture in many months. 
Would advise only one day showing. Played Dec. 21. 
— R. W. Heckman, Lyric Theatre, Greenville, 111. 
Small town patronage. 

RACKETY RAX: Victor McLaglen — Failed to 
please the majority. Played Dec. 18-19.— C. M. 
Hartman, Liberty Theatre, Carnegie, Okla. Small 
town patronage. 

RACKETY RAX: Victor McLaglen and Edmund 
Lowe — It is just a bunch of foolishness about gangsters 
and racketeers muscling into football. Several times 
it seems on the verge of becoming a great picture 
but somehow fails to make the grade. However, it 
is a good idea and better than the average. — M. W. 
Larmour, National Theatre, Graham, Texas. Small 
town patronage. 

REBECCA OF SUNNYBROOK FARM: Marion 
Nixon — Maybe our patrons are too sophisticated for 
this type of play, or can it be that "Rebecca" has 
lost her pull? At any rate, we did not do business 
above average and they laughed in the wrong places. 
Okay for kids and no doubt fine for some towns. — 
M. R. Harrington, State Theatre, Portland, Oregon. 
Suburban patronage. 

TESS OF THE STORM COUNTRY: Janet Gay- 
nor and Charles Farrell— Good small town picture. 
Pleased but poor business because of snow storm 
and pre-Christmas. Played Dec. 21-22-23.— C. M. 
Hartman, Liberty Theatre, Carnegie, Okla. Small 
town patronage. 

TOO BUSY TO WORK: Will Rogers— The role 
fits Rogers like a glove. Good picture. Played Dec. 
14-1S-16.— C. M. Hartman, Liberty Theatre, Carnegie, 
Okla. Small town patronage. 

TOO BUSY TO WORK: Will Rogers— Usual 
good picture from Rogers. Drew a fine holiday 
business Thanksgiving Day and patrons were well 
pleased. Not quite as funny as some of his former 
pictures. Played Nov. 24-25.— R. W. Heckman, Lyric 
Theatre, Greenville, 111. Small town patronage. 



Majestic 



THE PHANTOM EXPRESS: William Collier, Jr., 
and Sally Blane — This is a very good railroad melo- 
drama. Everybody liked it, plenty of action and a 
good story. Both sound and photography fine. 
Played two days to very good business.— Jolm Hon- 
thaner. Comet Theatre, Milwaukee, Wis. General 
patronage. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

DOWNSTAIRS: John Gilbert and Virginia Bruce- 
Acting okay in this one, but story rather weak. 
Interest centered on Bruce as latest Mrs. Gilbert. 
No special pulling power. — M. R. Harrington, State 
Theatre, Portland, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

GRAND HOTEL: (All star)— Did about what an 
ordinary program picture would do with the adver- 
tising we put out on it. It is well acted and produced 
and plenty of stars for drawing power, but it is 
not the picture for the movie goers of a small town. 
The picture has had too much ballyhoo, in my 
opinion. \Vhere all the big critics can give it the 
rating they did, I can't see it. Played Dec. 18-19-20. 
Running time, 115 minutes. — G. N. Turner, Family 
Theatre, Pine City, Minn. Small town patronage. 

GRAND HOTEL: All star— I did more business 
with a western picture in one night than I did with 
Metro's great masterpiece, "Grand Hotel," in three 
nights and I played both pictures the same week 
at the same admission price. Metro forced me to run 
it three nights but they should have made it at least 
a week and I might have made film rental out of it. 
Have never shown a picture that received so much 
unfavorable comment. People even knocked it that 
had never seen it. Personally I thought it a good 
picture but not the special production Metro would 
lead you to believe. Played Dec. 7-8-9.— R. W. Heck- 
man, Lyric Theatre, Greenville, 111. Small town 
patronage. 

MASK OF FU MANCHU: Boris Karlofif and 
Lewis Stone — ^Very good for week-day runs. Will 
satisfy those who like horror pictures. Played Dec. 
2(2-23.- Kreighbaum Brothers, Char-Bell Theatre, 
Rochester, Ind. Small town patronage. 

PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES: Stan Laurel and 
Oliver Hardy — It was the first Laurel and Hardy 
comedy run in this theatre for some years, so 
patrons did not know them so well but it did fair 
at the box office. It is a picture that will please 
most everyone. Play up to the kids on it. Played 
Dec. 11-12-13. Running time, 69 minutes.— G. N. 
Turner, Family Theatre, Pine City, Minn. Small 
town patronage. 

PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES: Stan Laurel and 
Oliver Hardy — I played this one on a Saturday 
midnight show and they ate it up. It is a much 
better picture than "Pardon Us." Played Dec. 17. — 
Tom Edwards, Ozark Theatre, Eldon, Mo. Small 
town patronage. 

PROSPERITY: Marie Dressier and Polly Moran— 
A splendid picture. Will do your house good to run 
it. Played Dec. 18-19.— Kreighbaum Brothers, Char- 
Bell Theatre, Rochester, Ind. Small town patronage. 

RED HEADED WOMAN: Jean Hariow— A Uttle 
too torrid for the kids and family trade, but it pulled 
for us. Some patrons thought it silly and others 
thought it good entertainment. Business above 
average. Harlow a favorite in this house. — M. R. 
Harrington, State Theatre, Portland, Oregon. Sub- 
urban patronage. 

RED HEADED WOMAN: Jean Harlow— Drew 
fair at the box ofiice. An adult picture and not for 
children. The acting is very good and the picture 
seemed to please. Played Dec. 4-5-6. Running time, 
83 minutes.— G. N. Turner, Family Theatre, Pine 
City, Minn. Small town patronage. 

SMILIN* THRU: Norma Shearer and Fredric 
March — A very beautiful picture. Shearer's best 
this year. Played Dec. 16-17. — Kreighbaum Brothers, 
Char-Bell Theatre, Rochester, Ind. Small town pat- 
ronage. 

SMIUN' THRU: Norma Shearer and Fredric 
March — Considered excellent except by a few who 
like westerns rather than sob stuff. Played Dec. 13- 
14-15. — Elaine S. Furlong, Star Theatre, Heppner, 
Oregon. Small town patronage. 

UNASHAMED: Helen Twelvetrees — Splendidly 
acted drama of a not too original story. Held in- 
terest to those who came, but business was not above 
average.— M. R. Harrington, State Theatre, Port- 
land, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 



44 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



Paramount 



THE BIG BROADCAST: (Radio stars)— I played 
this in terrible weather and as a result it didn't 
do big business, but it certainly did please everyone 
and many people said it was the best picture I had 
run in a year. I am going to try and bring it back 
when the weather is better, as I know a lot of people 
would come to see it again. Played Dec. 11-12. — 
Tom Edwards, Ozark Theatre, Eldon, Mo. Small 
town patronage. 

THE BIG BROADCAST: Bing Crosby, Stuart 
Erv/in, Leila Hyams and radio stars — Best entertain- 
ment in month. Great from start to finish — Walt 
Bradley, Moon Theatre, Neligh, Neb. General pat- 
ronage. 

BLONDE VENUS: Marlene Dietrich— Vei-y good 
show. Marlene Dietrich is like good whiskey, "she 
improves with age." — Walt Bradley, Moon Theatre, 
Neligh, Neb. General patronage. 

BLONDE VENUS: Marlene Dietrich— TTiere's only 
one Dietrich and she is in a class by herself in her 
particular type of acting ability. Dickie Moore is 
wonderful. The picture is great. Played Dec. 18-19. 
Running time, 93 minutes. — Horn and Morgan, Star 
Theatre, Hay Springs, Neb. Small town patronage. 

DEVIL AND THE DEEP : Tallulah Bankhead 
and Gary Cooper — Just the old eternal triangle plot 
all disguised for deep sea diving. Charles Laughton 
took honors for acting from the billed stars. Not 
for children, but they came. Just average business. — 
M. R. Hartman, State Theatre, Portland, Oregon. 
Suburban patronage. 

FOLLOW THE LEADER: Ed Wynn— I played 
this one two years ago and didn't do any business 
on it. Since then Wynn has popularized himself 
over the radio. I just brought it back on bargain 
night and it was the best bargain night business 
in three months. Everybody laughed loud and long 
including myself. Get it and spot it in and see if I'm 
not right. Played Dec. 27. — Tom Edwards, Ozark 
Theatre, Eldon, Mo. Small town patronage. 

GUILTY AS HELL: Victor McLaglen and Edmund 
Lowe — Too many "hell" titles lately, so this was just 
another average picture. Did hold interest and those 
who came went out satisfied. — M. R. Harrington, 
State Theatre, Portland, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

HOT SATURDAY: Nancy Carroll— Very good little 
program picture. Carroll does a clever bit of acting. 
Business decidedly ofif on this one. Woman radio 
announcer panned this picture so hard that it 
absolutely ruined its drawing power. Played Nov. 14. 
• — R. W. Heckman, Lyric Theatre, Greenville, 111. 
Small town patronage. 

ISLAND OF LOST SOULS: Charles Laughton, 
Richard Arlen, Leila Hyams — Was the first in this 
territory to play this one. Satisfied most of our 
audience on account of it being different from the 
ordinary run of stories. Weird but has plenty of 
comedy relief. Miss Burke very good in her first 
role as the Panther Woman. Played Dec. 24. — L. G. 
Tewksbury, Opera House, Stonington, Maine. Small 
town patronage. 

LADY AND GENT: George Bancroft, Wynne 
Gibson — Dandy program picture. Pleased on Satur- 
day night. George Bancroft and Wynne Gibson do 
very good work. Some comedy in picture. — Walt 
Bradley, Moon Theatre, Neligh, Neb. General pat- 
ronage. 

MADAME RACKETEER: Alison Skipworth— 
Held of? playing this, but found when I did, it had 
some pulling jxjwer. Pleased everyone and pulled 
far above average. — M. R. Harrington, State Theatre, 
Portland, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

MAN FROM YESTERDAY: Clive Brook and 
Claudette Colbert — Not worth going back after though 
if "The Sign of the Cross" should make box office 
draw out of Colbert, who I think should be one, it 
will be worth digging up. It is a good program 
picture, if you know what I mean. — Charles Lee 
Hyde, Grand Theatre, Pierre, S. Dakota. Small 
town patronage. 

NIGHT AFTER NIGHT: George Raft— A swell 
picture. TTie cast was faultless and is this boy 
Raft "acoming?" Just watch him. A story with 
plenty of thrills and human interest. Not enough 
gang stuff to hurt. Played Dec. 14-15. Running 
time, 72 minutes. — Horn and Morgan, Star Theatre, 
Hay Springs, Neb. Small town patronage. 

NIGHT AFTER NIGHT: George Raft— This is 
another gangster picture but the love interest is 
emphasized and Raft gives a good, entertaining 
performance. — Charles Lee Hyde, Grand Theatre, 
Pierre, S. Dakota. Small town patronage. 

NIGHT AFTER NIGHT: George Raft and Con- 
stance Cummings — I consider "Night After Night" 
Paramount's best release to date. Boost it. Played 
Nov. 12. — R. W. Heckman, Lyric Theatre, Green- 
ville, 111. Small town patronage. 

THE NIGHT OF JUNE 13: Clive Brook— Here 
is one swell picture and it will send them out 
pleased. Played it Christmas week and while we 
did not do quite average business, that could not 
be attributed to the picture. Patrons were plenty 
loud in their praises. If you have this one coming, 
step on it and let your patrons know about it. 



It's worth all you may do for it.— M. R. Harrington, 
State Theatre, Portland, Oregon. Suburban patron- 
age. 

THE PHANTOM PRESIDENT: George M. Cohan, 
Jimmie Durante and Claudett Colbert— Certainly was 
a great comedy with plenty of action and holds the 
interest to the end. Played Dec. 16-17. Running time, 
78 minutes.— Horn and Morgan, Star Theatre, Hay 
Springs, Neb. Small town patronage. 

70,000 WITNESSES: Charles Ruggles and Phillips 
Holmes — One of the finest mystery pictures in a 
long time. Drew only average business, but pleased 
everyone. Ruggles good for many laughs as inebriate 
radio announcer.— M. R. Harrington, State Theatre, 
Portland, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

VANISHING FRONTIER: John Mack Brown— Not 
a regular western, but a story of old California. This 
was especially liked by our people. The first real 
cold weather held down the attendance, but if you 
want a charming love story coupled with action get 
this picture. Played Nov. 11-12. Running time, 69 
minutes.— A. N. Niles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, 
Ky. Small town patronage. 



RKO Radio 



THE AGE OF CONSENT: Dorothy Wilson— Used 
this for a Saturday midnight show and it went over 
all right. Glad we did not play it on a run of even 
two days, for it is nothing to rave about. Some sizz- 
ling situations and dialogue made it unsuitable for 
kids. Business not so good. — M. R. Harrington, State 
Theatre, Portland, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

BILL OF DIVORCEMENT: John Barrymore- 
Those who like drama without one moment of comedy 
in the 76 minutes, will eat this one up, and for fine 
acting by a fine cast there has been nothing better 
in a long time. We played it on Sunday and Monday 
and it drew little below average business, but bad 
weather no doubt cut some business. The picture 
pleased all except the younger set. Played Dec. 18-19. 
Running time, 76 minutes. — S. M. Farrar, Orpheum 
Theatre, Harrisburg, 111. Small town patronage. 

BILL OF DIVORCEMENT: John Barrymore— 
Extra good drama, but no box office. — M. W. Lar- 
mour. National Theatre, Graham, Texas. Small town 
patronage. 

BILL OF piVORCEMFNT: John Barrymore— 
A very fine picture that will please the women and 
sorne. men who like real drama and very fine acting. 
It is a picture that you can steo on and you should 
do the business for thev will talk about it and boost 
it for you. Play it, by all means. Played Nov. 29-30- 
Dec. 1. Running time, 69 minutes. — G. N. Turner, 
Family Theatre, Pine City, Minn. Small town patron- 
age. 

BILL OF DiypRCEMENT: John Barrymore and 
Billie Burke — Divided opinion. Fair crowd. Quite a 
number seemed to have heard there was some splen- 
did acting in this one. Played Dec. 20-21-22.— Elaine 
S. Furlong, Star Theatre, Heppner, Oregon. Small 
town patronage. 

BIRD OF PARADISE: Dolores Del Rio— Above 
average business and picture entertained, but it was 
not "Bird of Paradise" as the older patrons remem- 
bered it. Beautiful _ scenic background and music, 
but whole thing decidedly unconvincing. Would not 
recommend for smaller children, but they came. — M. 
R. Harrington, State Theatre, Portland, Oregan. Sub- 
urban patronage. 

BRING 'EM BACK ALIVE: (Frank Buck)— Played 
this ahead of "Congorilla" and did better than aver- 
age business. Picture aroused some adverse criticism 
from women patrons who considered the scenes be- 
tween the python and tiger too strong for nerves. 
Certainly not a "special" for us. but in other com- 
munities should pull. Okay for older children. — M. R. 
Harrington, State Theatre, Portland, Oregon. Subur- 
ban patronage. 

GHOST . VALLEY: Tom Keene— A new type of 
western with plenty of mystery mixed into it. Plenty 
of action, suspense and thrills. Good Saturday picture. 



Ticket Machine Bargains 

TRADE-IN-VALUES 

AUTOMATIC GOLD SEAL 

And 

SIMPLEX TICKET REGISTERS 

Good as New . . . 
Mechanically Perfect 

As Low As ^50^ 

Bonded Guarantee of Responsibility 



TICKET REGISTER CORP. 



1600 BROADWAY NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Phone: CHickering 4— 6S10 



Played Dec. 2J-24. Running time, 55 minutes.— G. 
N. Turner, Family Theatre, Pine City, Minn. Small 
town patronage. 

HELL'S HIGHWAY: Richard Dix— This did not 
get over. It opened to good business and then went 
down to nothing the second day. The drop was caused 
by those who saw it the first day and going out and 
knocking it. The women were very much displeased 
with this one. It's a rather brutal thing at that, and 
I do not think it good entertainment for any crowd. 
Played Dec. 14-15. Running time, 80 minutes.— S. 
M. Farrar, Orpheum Theatre, Harrisburg, 111. Small 
town patronage. 

HELL'S HIGHWAY: Richard Dix— The men and 
children thought it was swell but it didn't get over 
with the women. Didn't bring anything extra into the 
box office. Played Dec. 16-17.— Elaine S. Furlong, 
Star Theatre, Heppner, Oregon. Small town patron- 
age. 

HOLD 'EM JAIL: Bert Wheeler and Robert Wool- 
sey— Whde this team is not too well liked by our 
patrons, this picture did pull better than average. 
They laughed plenty and we had no kicks. Personally 
thought it their best picture since "Rio Rita." Okay 
for kids.— M. R. Harrington, State Theatre, Portland, 
Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

HOLD 'EM JAIL: Bert Wheeler and Robert Wool- 
sey— This is good fun. Cast is fine and the crowd 
expects slapstick comedy and gets it "aplenty."— 
Charles Lee Hyde, Grand Theatre, Pierre, S. Da- 
kota. Small town patronage. 

THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME: Leslie Banks 
and Joel McCrea— This is thrilling and well produced 
but did not draw the crowd nor bring others back 
for the second night. It just hasn't got the heart 
interest to appeal.— Charles Lee Hyde, Grand Theatre, 
Pierre, S. Dakota. Small town patronage. 

ROAR OF THE DRAGON: Richard Dix, Gwili 
Andre— Good action picture, pleased our Saturday 
crowd. Played Dec. 16-17.— Bob Wygant, Heights 
Theatre, Houston, Texas. Neighborhood patronage. 



Universal 



THE ALL AMERICAN: Richard Arien and Gloria 
Stuart— Good football picture. Played Dec. 4-5.— 
C. M. Hartman, Liberty Theatre, Carnegie, Okla. 
Small town patronage. 

BACK STREET: Irene Dunne— Booked this almost 
cold, but at that it did far above average business. 
One of the finest pictures we have ever played and 
the raves were plenty, especially from the women. 
Not for kids.— M. R. Harrington, State Theatre, 
Portland, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

BACK STREET: Irene Dunne and John Boles— 
The best picture that Universal has put on the 
market for some time. It's a picture that will please 
and your people will tell you, also your friends, 
about it. The acting in the picture is first rate. 
Played Dec. 25-26. Running time, 88 minutes.— 
G. N. Turner, Family Theatre, Pine City, Minn. 
Small town patronage. 

IGLOO: (Native cast) — Comments not favorable 
but I had faith in it. Advertised it and talked it 
up. It was well liked. Three teachers brought 
pupils. People who had seen it are still talking 
of !t. Those who did not see it are sorry. — Mrs. 
George Thomsen, Garden Theatre, Arthur, III. Small 
town patronage. 

LAW AND ORDER: Walter Huston— A very 
good western with plenty of action and very good 
acting. One that will please all. Played Dec. 9-10. 
Running time, 73 minutes.— G. N. Turner, Family 
Theatre, Pine City, Minn. Small town patronage. 

MY PAL THE KING: Tom Mix— My dainty little 
girl patrons liked it. Thought it was sweet. The 
boys and the grown ups thought it too juvenile and 
"kindergartenish," Tlie producers seem to have 
overlooked the fact that Mix did not attain his 
popularity playing in such pictures as "My Pal the 
King."— M. W. Larmour, National Theatre, Graham, 
Texas. Small town patronage. 



Warner 



A SUCCESSFUL CALAMITY: George Arliss— The 
best of the Arliss pictures in the lighter vein. Pulled 
way above average and made many pleased patrons. 
Good clean comedy, free from smut and the old sex 
stuflf. Why can't we have more like this? Fine for 
family trade.— M. R. Harrington, State Theatre, Port- 
land, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

A SUCCESSFUL CALAMITY: George Ariiss— This 
is fine entertainment. Old and young will enjoy it 
if you can get the youth to come and see Arliss. A 
very pleasing picture for the entire family as it deals 
with the good old family problem of holding the flock 
together.— Charles Lee Hyde, Grand Theatre, Pierre, 
S. Dakota. Small town patronage. 

BLESSED EVENT: Lee Tracy and Mary Brian- 
Tracy makes history with this one. He is the whole 
show and a very good one. It is snappy and perhaps 
will shock some, but the real humor in the show will 
make most completely overlook the low moral tone or 
perhaps we should say the lack of moral tone.— 
Charles Lee Hyde, Grand Theatre, Pierre, S. Dakota. 
Small town patronage. 

THE EXPERT: "Chic" Sale, Dickie Moore— Good 
picture which pleased nearly all who saw it. Played 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTU RE HERALD 



45 



Nov. 12.— Bob Wygant, Heights Theatre, Houston, 
Texas. Neighborhood patronage. 

ONE WAY PASSAGE: William Powell and Kay 
Francis — This is good entertainment. The ending is 
rather hidden, but not punishing and the dramatic 
interest is constant throughout the entire show.— 
Charles Lee Hyde, Grand Theatre, Pierre, S. Dakota. 
Small town patronage. 

STRANGER IN TOWN: Charles "Chic" Sal^Not 
a particular favorite with our patrons, but this pulled 
very well. It pleased most everyone. Good clean 
story and fine for kids.— M. R. Harrington, State 
Theatre, Portland, Oregon. Suburban patronage. 

TWO AGAINST THE WORLD: Constance Bennett 
—Bennett is a natural for us, but this is far from 
her best picture. They came plenty, but went out 
not too satisfied. Business fine.— M. R. Harrington, 
State Theatre, Portland, Oregon, Suburban patronage. 

Short Features 
Educational 

THE FLIRTY SLEEPWALKER: Arthur Stone- 
Good comedy. Plenty laughs m this one.— Bob 
Wygant, Heights Theatre, Houston, Texas. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

ATHLETIC DAZE: Very good short.— Walt Brad- 
ley, Moon Theatre, Neligh, Neb. 

OVER THE COUNTER: A very neat and novel 
two-reel subject, in color.— Bert Silver, Silver Family 
Theatre, Greenville, Mich. Small town patronage. 

PIGSKIN; Good football short, showing training 
and actual playing.-Cecil Ward, Roxy Theatre, Mar- 
tinsville, Va. Small town patronage. 

SCRAM: Laurel and Hardy— Just an9ther , Laurel 
and Hardy comedy. Few laughs. Running time, 20 
minutes.-Cecil Ward, Roxy Theatre, Martmsville, 
Va. Small town patronage. 

SHOW BUSINESS: Zasu Pitts Thelma Todd- 
Good comedy. With the ever dumb Zasu Pitts and 
beautiful Thelma Todd as show girls on a train with 
a monkey. Getting in trouble, finally getting kicked 
off train.— Cecil Ward, Roxy Theatre, Martmsville, 
Va. Small town patronage. 

WHAT PRICE TAXI: Taxi Boys— Two- reel com- 
edy. Plenty of laughs.— L. G. Tewksbury, Opera 
House, Stonington, Maine. Small town patronage. 

WHAT PRICE TAXI: The Taxi Boys— Very good 
action comedy. 18 minutes.— Mrs. Edith M. Fordyce, 
Princess Theatre, Selma, La. Small town patronage. 

Paramount 

BETTY BOOP, M.D.: Not up to their 1932-33 aver- 
age for Betty.-J. G. Estee, S. T. Theatre, Parker. 
S. D. Small town patronage. 

BEYOND THE BLUE HORIZON: Vincent Lopez 
and Orchestra— Good band act.— Bob Wygant, Heights 
Theatre, Houston, Texas. 

COURTING TROUBLE: Charlie Murray— A good 
comedy. Better than Paramount has been giving us 
the past year. Hope they keep it up. Running time, 
20 minutes.— Horn and Morgan, Star Theatre, Hay 
Springs, Neb. Small town patronage. 

COURTING TROUBLE: Charles Murray— Fair, 
action good.— Orris F. Collins, Capitol Theatre, Para- 
gould, Ark. General patronage. 

DINAH: Mills Brothers— These boys are always 
good. Advertise them and get extra business. Run- 
ning time, 7 minutes.— Orris F. Collins, Capitol Thea- 
tre, Paragould, Ark. General patronage. 

FALSE IMPRESSIONS: Lloyd Hamilton— Not 
much to this slapstick. Nothing offensive, however.-- 
J. G. Estee, S. T. Theatre, Parker, S. D. Small 
town patronage. 

HAWKINS AND WATKINS: Two reel comedy. 
Plenty of action. Good.— L. G. Tewksbury, Opera 
House, Stonington, Maine. Small town patronage. 

HAWKINS AND WATKINS: Most unfunny com- 
edy in years.— Walt Bradley, Moon Theatre, Nehgh, 
Neb. 

HOLLYWOOD ON PARADE No. 2: (cartoon)— 
Very good, but not in the class of No. 1. Running 
time, 10 minutes.— Horn and Morgan, Star Theatre, 
Hay Springs, Neb. Small town patronage. 

I AIN'T GOT NOBODY: Mills Brothers— Abso- 
lutely the best short I have ever run. Billed this 
as big as the feature. Mills Brothers are exceedingly 
popular here and it went over big.— P. H. BiUiet, 
Coliseum Theatre, Annawan, 111. Small town pat- 
ronage. 

JUST A GIGOLO: Irene Bordoni— A screen song 
and that's saying it's good. Never had a flop but 
some are better than others. This was not the best 
of the lot. Running time, 8 minutes.— Horn and Mor- 
gan, Star Theatre, Hay Springs, Neb. Small town 
patronage. 



WHAT TME PICTURE 
DID FOR HIM 




Jl/ST AN B%Hi8no(2-, 
IN A SMALL TOWN 



which Guy Jones, formerly of the Prin- 
cess theatre in Cleveland, Tenn., sketched 
upon the envelope of a letter to "Chick" 
Lewis, editor of the Managers' Round Table 
department. What we're wondering about 
is: Where's the other dime? Or maybe a 
quarter, dime and nickel have compositely 
shrunk to the value of three dimes. 



LET ME CALL YOU SWEETHEART: Ethel 
Merman — Good song cartoon and my audience really 
sang this, as they rarely do. — A. N. Miles, Eminence 
Theatre, Eminence, Ky. Small town patronage. 

MA'S PRIDE AND JOY: Donald Novis— Nice sing- 
ing act interspersed with the action of this comedy. 
Novis can sing. — J. G. Estee, S. T. Theatre, Parker, 
S. D. Small town patronage. 

MYSTERIOUS MYSTERY: Johnny Burke— Not 
worth playing. — A. N. Miles, Eminence Theatre, 
Eminence, Ky. Small town patronage. 

OLD MAN BLUES: Ethel Merman— Too high class 
for our patrons, and no one liked it. Nothing but high 
class singing. — Bob Wygant, Heights Theatre, Hous- 
ton, Texas. 

PATENT PENDING: Gracie Allen and George 
Burns — One of the best comedy teams on the screen. 
Running time, 8 minutes. — Orris F. Collios, Capitol 
Theatre, Paragould, Ark. General patronage. 

ROMANTIC MELODIES: Arthur Tracy— Most de- 
lightful singing of three well known love ballads. — 
A. N. Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence, Ky. 
Small town patronage. 

SHINE ON HARVEST MOON: Alice Joy— About 
the best screen song except Mills Brothers that I 
have ever run. Very cleverly arranged with Alice 
Joy doing some fine singing. — P. H. IJilliet, Coliseum 
Tlieatre, Annawan, 111. Small town patronage. 

_ SINGING PLUMBER: Donald Novis— The singing 
in this "so called comedy" is good, but there is no 
comedy in it. Running time, 18 minutes. — Orris F. 
Collins, Capitol Theatre, Paragould, Ark. General 
patronage. 

SINGING PLUMBER: Donald Novis— Absolutely 
great for us. Many people stayed to hear it the 
second time. This boy can sing and in this comedy 
he singrs "Trees," "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling," 
"Peggy O'Neil" and "Good Old Summer Time" to 
splendid advantage. Get it. — A. N. Miles, Eminence 
TTieatre, Eminence, Ky. Small town patronage. 

WATER JAMBOREE: Scenes at Crystal Springs. 
Florida, showing underwater swimming, fight with 
alligator and high diving stunts. All extremely in- 
teresting. — ^A. N. Miles, Eminence Theatre, Eminence. 
Ky. Small town patronage. 



RKO Radio 



GUESTS WANTED: Benny Rubin— Good funny 
comedy.— Bob Wygant, Heights Theatre, Houston, 
Texas. 

MICKEY'S CHARITY: Mickey McGuire and Gang 
— Not as good as usual, but will please the kiddies. — 
D. E. Fitton, Lyric Theatre, Harrison, Ark. Small 
town patronage. 

MICKEY'S HOLIDAY: Mickey McGuire— Good kid 
comedy.— Bob Wygant, Heights Theatre, Houston, 
Texas. 



THE MILLIONAIRE CAT: Clark and McCullough 
— Fairly good slap stick comedy.^l>. E. Fitton, Lyric 
Theatre, Harrison, Ark. Small town patronage. 

PARLOR, BEDROOM AND WRATH: Edgar 
Kennedy — Terribly "unfunny." Two reels. — Bert Sil- 
ver, Silver Family Theatre, Greenville, Mich. Small 
town patronage. 

TWO LIPS AND JULEPS: Masquers Comedies- 
Just a wrinkle. Two reels. — Bert Silver, Silver Family 
Theatre, Greenville, Mich. Small town patronage. 

USE YOUR NOODLE; Roscoe Ates— Very good.— 
Orris F. Collins, Capitol Theatre, Paragould, Ark. 
General patronage. 

USE YOUR NOODLE: Roscoe Ates— Good comedy 
of the slapstick type. Brought out many laughs. — 
Bob Wygant, Heights Theatre, Houston, Texas. 



Universal 



STRANGE AS IT SEEMS: Color. One of the best 
short reels on the market. I feature my short reels 
the same as feature pictures and in many cases the 
shorts will save the show. Running time, 10 minutes. 
— ^R. W. Reckman, Lyric Theatre, Greenville, 111. 
Small town patronage. 

Warner Vitaphone 

C'EST PAREE, TEE FOR TWO, HEY HEY 
WESTERNER: Three two-reel subjects in techni- 
color. Beautiful photography, wonderful dancing and 
gorgeous settings. Will bolster a weak picture and 
send them away with a smile. Warner short service 
is hard to beat. Running time, 20 minutes. — R. W. 
Heckman, Lyric Theatre, Greenville, 111. Small town 
patronage. 

A MODERN CINDERELLA: Ruth Etting— Clever 
little story which allows Ruth Etting to sing as only 
she can. My patrons like her. Running time, 18 
minutes. — R. E. Falkenberg, Majestic Theatre, Lex- 
ington, Neb. Family patronage. 

RAMBLING AROUND RADIO ROW No. 2: Radio 
stars — Not as good as former radio numbers. Music 
not so hot and stars not known. Running time, 9 
minutes. — R, W. Heckman, Lyric Theatre, Greenville, 
111. Small town patronage. 

SHERLOCK'S HOME: Jack Haley— Just fair. Not 
many laughs. Running time, 20 minutes. — Horn and 
Morgan Star Theatre, Hay Springs, Neb. Small town 
patronage. 



>erials 



Uni 



niversai 

THE AIR MAIL MYSTERY: James Flavin, Lucille 
Browne — As good as any serial. The kids liked it. — 
Bob Wygant, Heights Theatre, Houston, Texas. 



Film Guild Plans Program 

The Film Guild, new film art movement 
started by Symon Gould, with offices at 723 
Seventh avenue, New York, will begin ac- 
tivities with the showing of a special pro- 
gram of uncensored pictures early in 
January. 



Resigns as Sales Director 

Morris A. Epstein has resigned as direc- 
tor of sales and advertising of Chicago 
Film Laboratory, Inc., and plans a new 
connection shortly. He maintains an office 
at 185 North Wabash avenue, Chicago. 



RCA, Shipping Board Renew 

Radio Corporation of America will con- 
tinue during 1933 to supply radio service 
to all vessels of the United States Shipping 
Board, in accordance with a renewal of an 
existing agreement. 



Trains To Show Warner Films 

The Pennsylvania Railroad has contracted 
for Warner features to be shown on the 
special Florida train of the road. This is 
said to be the first time motion pictures will 
be shown regularly on trains. 



Named to Sales Post 

Frank Gebhardt has been named as sales 
representative in the Atlanta territory for 
Warner by Grad Sears, in charge of south- 
ern and western sales. 



46 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



TECHN€L€eiCAL 



||l IN' 



I 



The BLUEBOOK School 

By F. H. RICHARDSON 

BLUEBOOK SCHOOL QUESTION NO. 154.— (A) Do different mefals offer varying degree of resistance to 
electric current? (B) Does the resistance of all metals used in conducting current increase as tennperature is 
increased? (C) Name something used under some conditions to conduct current which has less resistance at 
high than at low temperature. (D) Name some other things which have less resistance to electric flow when 
hot than when cold. 



Answer to Question No. 148 



Bluebook Question No. 148 was: {A) 
Explain in some detail just why alternat- 
ing current will provide jar less illumina- 
tion for projection purposes than will an 
equal amperage of direct current, other 
things being equal. (B) Tell us, so far as 
you know, just why a. c. provides different 
color or tone of light than does d. c, using 
an arc of course. (C) Is the light from 
either a. c. or d. c. continuous in brilliancy f 

Sorry, men, but the list of those answer- 
ing correctly is short. Here it is: G. E. 
Doe, S. Evans and C. Rau, Lester Borst, 
B. Doe, T. Van Vaulkenburg, Dale Daniel- 
son, H. D. Schofield, J. Wentworth, A. 
Breston and G. Lombard and T. Toor and 
P. L. Davis. The shortest list I can re- 
member. 

Concerning Section A, I believe T. 
Wentworth's answer ranks perhaps highest. 
He says : 

"There are several things enter into this 
matter, but of course the chief one is the 
fact that the power of the current is, by 
reason of its alternations, divided equally 
between the two carbon tips, instead of be- 
ing all concentrated upon one, as with d. c. 
Naturally this results in two small light 
sources (craters) instead of one only, one 
of which is, for reasons any projectionist 
well understands, wholly available for mo- 
tion picture projection. It is possible to 
use both craters, but only with inefficiency. 
Experience has taught that decidedly bet- 
ter result in screen illumination is had by 
using only one a. c. crater. 

"Another point is that since an a. c. pro- 
jection arc is of necessity much shorter 
(distance carbon tip to carbon tip) than is 
the d. c. arc of equal amperage, there will 
be added shadow interference by the lower 
carbon tip, as compared with the d. c. arc. 
Still a third thing is the fact that the very 
small a. c. crater is much more difficult to 
maintain at the best, most efficient angle for 
projection, as well as to maintain in the 
most perfect shape generally. 

"On the other hand, all this is to some 
extent (I do not know exactly to what ex- 
tent and would like to hear from you on 
this point) offset by the fact that light from 
the a. c. arc has a higher power of pene- 
tration and, aside from quality of light tone 
effect, therefore has higher power of screen 



illumination. Up to this time I have seen 
no comparative measurements of screen il- 
lumination by a. c. and d. c. arcs. They 
would certainly be interesting. How about 
it, Mr. Editor?" 

(B) I believe G. E. Doe did best on this 
one. He says : 

"The chief reason for difference in light 
tone as between a. c. and d. c. arcs is be- 
cause of different chemicalization of the 
carbon cores. A minor reason is, I believe, 
that the great amount of gas produced by 
d. c. arcs tends to soften the light, impart- 
ing to it an amber tone. The new National 
Carbon book, page 36, says, 'The alternat- 
ing current arc between neutral cored car- 
bon tips affords less than half as much 
usable light as the d. c. arc of equal elec- 
trical input, and the color is more yellow, 
due to the lower temperature of the carbon 
tips,' which information I am myself unable 
to see the value of," 

What National says in the book is quite 
all right, but is a bit confusing in this in- 
stance for the reason that we do not any 
longer use neutral-cored carbons for pro- 
jection purposes. As to a. c. carbon arc 
carbon tips having a somewhat lower tem- 
perature than the positive of a d. c. arc of 
equal amperage, it seems reasonable — 
though since in both cases the volatilization 
point or temperature of carbon must be 
reached, it does not seem that the difference 
could be sufficient to affect the color of the 
light very much. We would appreciate hear- 
ing from the National Carbon Company 
Engineering Department further on this 
point. 

(C) I think friend Van Vaulkenburg has 
perhaps a bit the best of it on this one. He 
says : 

"Light from neither a. c. nor d. c. is con- 
tinuous in brilliancy, if we accept 'continu- 
ous' to mean constant and unvarying in 
brilliance. First, considering a carbon arc, 
we all know there are fluctuations of con- 
siderable amount caused by impurities in 
the carbons, by differences in structure in 
different parts of individual carbons, by air 
drafts and by voltage fluctuations ; also, in 
modern practice, since carbon feeding ap- 
paratus does not actually maintain always 
an exactly even gap, there are differences set 
up in illumination. 



"But aside from all this, a. c. has one dead 
period each cycle, which means 60 dead 
periods per second with 60-cycle current, 
or 25 with 25-cycle current. Certainly such 
voltage fluctuations must and do set up a 
condition where brilliancy cannot possibly 
be constant, even though it may seem so to 
the eye. D. c, on the other hand, has no 
periods of dead voltage, but has pulsations, 
and these pulsations do theoretically affect 
the light, making it less than constant in 
brilliancy. However, I doubt that it really 
does so, for the reason that these pulsations 
are very slight and enormously rapid — so 
much so that I do not believe their effect 
can possibly be communicated to the floor 
of the crater sufficiently to set up tempera- 
ture variation, and if my idea be right, then 
so far as the current itself is concerned, the 
d. c. light may be accepted as constant. I 
believe also that the same idea holds good 
when we consider incandescent lighting. 
Will you give us your views on this?" 

Correcting 
Two Errors 

Gosh, all hemlock .'■ I've been swamped 
with roasts by mail for a week or so past. 
The second error, this time just a stupid 
one, in a month ! Oh, well, fellers, any- 
how you can't say I get that way often. 
Can't remember a printed one for a long, 
long while, until these two. 

In answering a question propounded by 
Brother Dale Danielson of Russel, Kan., in 
his answer to Section C of Question 146, in 
the Bluebook School of the December 10th 
issue, I said: "You have overlooked the 
fact that the low period (a. c.) comes only 
at the end of each cycle." 

Now I really think you will all agree that 
I knew better than that. It was an unfor- 
tunate, inexcusable mental lapse. A low 
period of course occurs at the end of each 
alternation, and since there are (25-cycle 
current under consideration) 50 alternations 
per second, there would be 50 X 60 = 3,000 
low periods per minute. 

Also in the same answer, the word "or" 
at the end of the third line of Lester Borst's 
answer to Section B, should have been 
"and." My carbon copy shows that to be a 
misprint not chargeable to me. 



January 7,1933 



ROUND TABLE CLUB 






ROUND TA 

international association of showmen meeting weekly }^ 
in MOTION PICTURE HERALD for mutual aid and progress 

CHARLES E. (''CHICIi'') LEWIS, chairman and edito>^ 




KAYOED BY A BUG! 

BELIEVE IT OR NOT. but we had a little set-to with 
Kid Bug of the grippe bugs and he floored us for 
about a count of nine. As a result we've been fightin' 
a hundred and three fever for the last ten days and having 
a rather hectic time of it to boot. 

As we dreamt our fever-tossed dreams we pictured many 
unusual things; such as S R O signs out over the box office 
every night; bosses who let us run our theatres as we 
thought best; no home office red tape to bother with; a 
day off every week, free from worry; several salary in- 
creases that brought our weekly stipend back to where it 
was B. C. (Before circuits). And after dreaming all of 
these nice things we awoke to learn that we had been 
delirious. Oh well; one would have to be delirious to 
imagine such swell things actually happening. 

V V V 

TEN DAYS ON YOUR back is a long time and affords 
ample opportunities to dwell upon the things to be and 
so we've been mentally going over the territory to be 
covered bv the forthcoming Ohio trek. After visiting with 
Nat Holt and his RKO pace-setters we're gonna amble 
over to Newark to see what Ed Heihie's claims to the Hall 
of Fame are all about. Then of course Mansfield will be a 
necessary stop to look up among others, Tim Roberts, that 
grand ol' man of showbusiness. Youngstown is also on the 
itinerary unless something intervenes, so we'll be seein' you 
"Sig" Solomon. 

Just how many other spots we will be able to make is 
going to depend on time and our now shaky frame. If the 
trip don't become too strenuous we'll try to look In on a 
few dozen others. After reading what Red Kann had to 
say about the key spots we have a real hankering to 
know what some real show-towns look like; having always 
been a firm believer in the fact that real showbusiness can 
only be found outside of the key cities. 

V V V 

AND NOT TOO FAR in the ofRng is that five or six 
week trip into the Southlands. (Someone please sing "Dixie".) 
it looks as though we will finally make good a three year 
old threat to visit with Frank Boucher, Walter Morris, Bill 
Brock and about fifty other southern showmen, many who 
are Charter Members of the Club and staunch supporters 
ever since Its Inception. The Southern states have always 
been Important so far as the Round Table Is concerned 
because of the fine spirit the members down there have 
always shown. Those who read the Club pages carefully 



will recall dozens of regular contributors from south of the 
Mason-Dixon line. 

And at the end of \\\q Southern trip will be the glorious 
beach of Miami and such pals as Hal Kopplin, Sonny 
Shepherd, Mike Vogel, J. H. McKoy and all those others 
whose names just don't come to mind for the moment. And 
from Miami we are looking forward to the TimlamI trail over 
to Tampa where Jesse Clarke and the other Sparks business 
builders hold forth. It's been a good many years since 
we navigated that trail across Florida. 

V V V _ 

ONE OF THE MOST soothing medicines during our In- 
carceration was the twenty two hundred holiday cards which 
were sent up from the office for me to look through. What 
a thrill that was; imagine, twenty-two hundred showmen 
who remembered us during one of the worst slump holiday 
seasons that the business has ever experienced. Well, to 
each and every one of those boys — and girls — who so 
thoughtfully sent a card we extend our sincere thanks and 
we want you all to know that It went a long ways towards 
killing that fever and shoving us along the road to re- 
covery. 

V V V 

WELL, WITH A MEAN case of the grippe finally beaten 
and now rarin' to go we are all set for a brand new year. 
A year In which we hope to see the Round Table Club 
ana Motion Picture Herald still more firmly implanted 
throughout the entire Industry. With an active membership 
of close to four thousand showmen we feel that we honestly 
have a majority representation already, but we won't be 
satisfied until we have increased the number to at least 
five thousand. That means one thousand additional members 
for nineteen thirty three. 

Here' a chance for every Round Tabler to do his bit; let 
each member take it upon himself to enroll one new mem- 
ber. Just check up on all the showmen within your imme- 
diate vicinity and If you find one or two who are not 
members, clip the application from the Club pages and 
send it In with your own name signed on the bottom as 
proposer. 

"In Unity There Is Strength," and the membership of 
the Round Table Club Is rapidly becoming a formidable 
factor In the future of our business. You can never tell to 
what extent your membership may help you along the road; 
join now and let's all pull for a bigger and better show- 
business. "CHICK" 



48 



ROUND TABLE CLUB 



January 7, 1933 



DICK KIRSCHBAUM'S LOBBY LAFFS! 



Just another one 
of those ques- 
tions that makes 
gray hair turn 
white. Oh, well!!! 




SOME BREEZY NOTES 
ABOUT CLEM POPE'S 
GANG IN CINCINNATI 

News from the middle west division of 
RKO, supplied the Club through courtesy 
of Clem Pope, city manager in Cincinnati, 
indicates that the fellows out in his city 
have been busy. 

As a means of plugging the RKO Thrift 
Book idea, Horace Wersel, assistant man- 
ager of the Capitol Theatre, took a little 
jaunt around town and convinced three 
Plymouth auto dealers it would be a great 
stunt to bestow one of the brand new 
models on the RKO patron who turned in 
the best "Ten Reasons Why I Should Buy 
an RKO Thrift Book." 

The car was put on display at two or 
three theatres and trailers and billboards 
were extensively used to plug the idea. 
Over the week-end 10,000 cash customers 
helped themselves to entry blanks, which 
were available at all theatres but not handed 
out in the usual fashion. In other words, the 
scheme had merit enough to function, on 
its own, thereby doing away with the usual 
litter generally following promiscuous dis- 
tribution to passers-by in foyer, lobby or 
entrance. The thought behind the move was 
to familiarize the public with Thrift, rather 
than campaign for direct sales. Following 
preliminary effort a more direct campaign 
for sales will be instituted between agen- 
cies and theatre. 

Great Combination! 

Transferring attention to the Lyric The- 
atre, where Manager Bill Hastings and 
Artist Huff form a hard-to-beat combination 
when it comes to planning lobbies that not 
only stop patrons but make 'em dizzy with 
delight, we find two heads of Dressier and 
Moran that attracted plenty of attention 



on "Prosperity." We understand Huff is an 
air-brush wizard. 

Hastings and Huff also constructed a 
miniature "Times Square" moving sign 
with the words "Prosperity Is Here" clip- 
ping along at the rate of about a mile per 
minute, or maybe twice as fast. The side- 
walk was jammed with people who stopped 
to read the sign. We have Clem Pope's 
word for it that it had anything he'd ever 
seen in the way of "speed atmosphere" beat 
to a frazzle. 

Hastings also made a tie-up with a local 
candy concern manufacturing the "Pros- 
perity Candy Bar," whereby 5,000 window 
cards were placed and 300 special window 
displays secured. As Clem briefly sums up 
the situation, Cincinnati knew that "Pros- 
perity" was in town — not around the cor- 
ner. 

Alexander's Displays! 

Then, there's Joe Alexander, who oper- 
ates the Family Theatre on a bi-weekly 
change but never fails to have a lobby dis- 
play that makes 'em stop, look and listen. 
When he showed "Head Hunters of Paqua" 
it looked as if he'd moved the entire city 
museum into the theatre lobby — daggers, 
shields, spears and everything. On a recent 
Tom Mix picture he filled the place with 
revolvers of all sizes and shapes ; on a pre- 
vious Tom Mix, Joe had about 600 old Mix 
stills in the lobby, which patrons stood and 
gaped at until their eyes bulged. They did 
more than look, states Clem, as the box 
office testified. 

Bill Dodds' Activities! 

Across the street from Joe, Bill Dodds, 
manager of the Grand, plugged "Hells 
Highway" with stories about the sweat box 
tragedy in Florida and a replica of a tor- 
ture chamber allegedly in use at prison 
camps. Whether the thought was enter- 



taining or not it stopped the passers-by and 
packed the house. 

Since Clem Pope started sending us a 
few words about the RKO crew out his 
way we've been able to get a line on w^av 
the fellows in Cincinnati have been doing 
and we hope he'll keep up the good work, 
even though we are fully aware that he has 
little time to spare from his own duties. 
However, his letters are particularly inter- 
esting and we'd sure hate to learn that this 
sturdy member of the Club had become in- 
flicted with writer's cramp. More news of 
the Cincinnati front next time. 



LASSMAN AND WILLS 
DOING A GOOD JOB 
FOR UTICA THEATRE 

Despite a three to four day run schedule 
and consequent scarcity of time to fashion 
outstanding displays for all pictures, ex- 
cellent work is being turned out from the 
work shop of the A^on Theatre, Utica, 
N. Y., by Manager Garry Lassman and 
Artist Win Wills. 

This time we are considerably handi- 
capped in the matter of reproducing a num- 
ber of photos sent along by Wills because 
the shots were taken at night time and signs 
and other lighting dominate the subjects; 
however, we can show one — a daytime photo 
of the Avon's gaily decorated front, panels 
and new price announcement boards at 
either side of entrance. The attractiveness 
of the artist's lettering is evident. 

A front made for "Grand Hotel" was 
quite large (42 feet long) yet very eco- 
nomical. The overhead banner was used 
on the inside as a Coming Attraction sign 
and then the tacked on letters were moved 
to the front banner. Wings used were de- 
tachable and put up only when necessary. 

Effective Front! 

The large front for "Movie Crazy" was 
also large 'though inexpensive to make. 
Harold Lloyd Movie Crazy was painted in 
a modified arc with a background of dark 
blue, name of star in white and title in 
light yellow. Shadow-like rays extending 
from the bottom of the letters were done in 
shades of orange. Catchlines in the Lloyd 
eye glasses were hand lettered. The eye- 
glass effect was also employed on the wings, 
with the same idea carried out in the mar- 
quee side lights by making the "O" in 
Harold and the "O" in Lloyd stand out 
from the rest of the letters. It was the first 
time this idea was used in Utica. 

Lassman encourages Wills to continually 
try for new effects and the ones described 
above caused considerable comment; hence. 




he's passing them along to his fellow Club 
members. We'll tell you more about his 
work in forthcoming issues. In the mean- 
time Hello to Lassman, whom we haven't 
heard a whole lot from since he moved from; 
Troy to Utica. How about this, Garry? 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



49 



SOME PHOTOGRAPHIC 
EVIDENCE OF WHAT 
SIZER RECENTLY DID 

The accompanying illustrations really tell 
the entire story of a couple of recent inci- 
dents in the career of Eaton M. Sizer, man- 
ager of the Fox Theatre, Appleton, Wis., 
but just to bolster up the cuts a bit and en- 
courage the printing profession, we'll jot 
down a bit of superfluous copy. 




Glancing at one it's altogether obvious 
that Eaton's S. O. S. for a Food Matinee 
received wide response from the good folk 
of Appleton. Through the Mayor a proc- 
lamation was made urging support of the 
relief program and the sympathetic parents 
of children supplied the latter with the pic- 
tured assortment of footstuffs to buy their 
admission to the show. And we don't mind 
telling you that it very much looks as 
though a lot of needy people were given a 
square meal or so. What do you say ? 

It seems almost trite to comment on the 
attractiveness of the "Bird of Paradise" 
float pictured in the other photo ; you can 




see that for yourselves. Lest your eyes are 
growing dim and the reproduction be poor, 
however, we'll add that a sextette of musi- 
cians and singers featured this novel and 
effective bally made to represent the pic- 
ture's theme and setting. Looks like Kate 
Smith sitting in the rear end. 

Good work on the part of Manager Sizer 
and we'll hope to receive other photo- 
graphic evidence of what's going on in 
showbusiness out his way. This is the 
first response we've had from him in a long, 
long time and it's gratifying to have him 
back on the active list again. 



DeVellier Dead 

William DeVellier, for some time asso- 
ciated with the A. H. Schwartz Century 
Circuit of Brooklyn, N. Y., recently passed 
away in a local hospital as the result of an 
operation. DeVellier was widely known in 
New York City and up-state theatre circles. 



Th. 
Sh 



owman s 



Calendar" 



JANUARY 

I4fh Bebe Daniels' Birlhday 

16th Harry Carey's Birthday 

17th Benjamin Franklin Born — 1705 

Nils Asther's Birthday 

18th Daniel Webster Born— 1782 

19th R. E. Lee Born— 1807 

21st Stonewall Jackson Born — 1824 

22nd Conrad Veidt's Birthday 

23rd Ralph Graves' Birthday 

John Hancock Born — 1737 
Raymond Griffith's Birthday 

24th Jack Hoxie's Birthday 

29th William McKinley Born— 1843 

30th Chinese New Year (D.EJ.) 

Greta Nissen's Birthday 

31st Tallulah Bankhead's Birthday 



FEBRUARY 

1st Clark Gable's Birthday 

U. S. Flag Raised in Hawaii — 
1893 

Ground Hog Day 

2nd Benny Rubin's Birthday 

3rd Woodrow Wilson's Death — 

1924 

Horace Greeley Born — 1811 
Mendelssohn (German Com- 
poser) Born 

4th Col. Lindbergh's Birthday — 

1904 

Massachusetts Ratified U. S. 
Constitution — 1788 
Ramon Novarro's Birthday 
Aaron Burr Born — 1756 
Walter Catlett's Birthday 

7th Charles Dickens Born — 1812 

First Telephone Made by 
Thomas Watson for Bel! — 1875 

8th Charles Ruggles' Birthday 

8th to 14th Boy Scout Week (23rd An- 
niversary) 



9th 



Nebraska Admitted to Union 
—1867 

Ronald Coleman's Birthday 
James Murray's Birthday 



G. LABY EXPLOITED 
CHAIN GANG PICTURE 
WITH NOVEL DISPLAY 

Display of chain gang camp implements 
and a caged, live prisoner in convict uni- 
form effectively exploited 'T Am a Fugi- 
tive" for G. Laby, manager of the Para- 
mount Theatre, Boston, Mass. 

One week in advance he built a display 
in the main lounge of the various items 




allegedly used in the daily life of a chain 
gang prisoner, including ball and chain, 
shackles, old cups and wash cans, whips and 
blankets. The display was further enhanced 
by many newspaper clippings concerning 
Burns, the fugitive, and a collection of stills 
from the picture. It went over so well in- 
side the theatre that Laby promoted a win- 
dow in an adjacent store for another display, 
such as shown in one of the accompanying 
photographs. 

In addition to the implements and chain 
gang data the store housed the heavily 
screened-in cage for the "prisoners." This 
stunt attracted so much attention advance 
and currently that an attendant had to be 



posted in the store to see that the side-wall 
was not completely blocked off. 

Granting that the film in question has real 
drawing power of its own, attention given 
the displays described above prompted 
Round Tabler Laby to pass the word along. 
He feels that the stunts helped him sell the 
picture and wants others to have this infor- 
mation. It's been some little time since 
we've heard from this Club member and 
we're mighty glad to have him back on 
the active list again. 



Gamme+t Now D. M. 

Harry Gammett, for the past three years 
manager of the Globe Theatre, Bethlehem, 
Pa., was recently appointed district manager 
there for A. R. Boyd Enterprises, with 
supervision over the Globe and the Em- 
bassy and Strand Theatres in Allentown, 
Pa; 



50 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



KEEPING UP WITH THE TIMES! 



By GUY JONES 




Maybe the manager of this theatre has his seasons mixed. 



SPECIAL NIGHT FOR 
STUDENTS ENDORSED 
BY FREDERICK HINDS 

In line with a recently published Club 
editorial on the subject of special admission 
prices for adolescents, Fred Hinds, owner- 
manager of the Strand Theatre, White- 
water, Wis., advises this department that 
his experience along these lines has proven 
most profitable to the box office. 

Whitewater only boasts a population of 
about 3,500, but includes a state teachers' 
college with an enrollment of 700 and two 
high schools with about 350 students. The 
college enrollment is in addition to regular 
population and, naturally, furnishes a large 
percentage of theatre business in normal 
times. 

About a year ago a check-up revealed 
that student trade had dropped to 35 per 
cent, a condition which made a big splash 
of red on the books. So Hinds called upon 
the college president and heads of the two 
high schools and obtained permission to 
place a card advertising "Student Night" 
on all bulletin boards, which students are 
required to read twice daily, announcing a 
special admission of 15 cents. 

On the first advertised "Student Night" 
one-half of the college enrollment and a 
somewhat smaller percentage of students 
from the high schools attended the show. 
Since then this unusually large attendance 
has proportionally fallen, but, to an extent 
where former revenue is still three times 
greater. 

The psychology of the scheme appears to 
lie in the fact that students, while not in- 
terested in attending a theatre when every 
night is open, will come when a night is 
set aside for them. Hinds tells us that he 
was strongly advised by a number of show- 
men not to make such a move, for fear of 
adverse reaction from adult patrons. At the 
time he, too, shared that fear but results 
proved to the contrary. While Student 
Nights were not advertised to the public it 



was but natural that others than scholars 
should become aware that a special night 
was being held. What Hinds' advisers 
failed to take into consideration was that 
every home in Whitewater, in some way 
closely identified with all schools, such as 
acting as boarding house, etc., became bene- 
ficiaries to the scheme. Whitewater has no 
dormitories. Ninety per cent of White- 
water homes have a son, daughter, niece, 
nephew, cousin or some relative in the col- 
lege or schools, and a benefit to any of the 
scholars is likewise a benefit to the adults. 

Hinds is in a position to accurately check 
revenue from adolescent patronage because 
his cashier is the High School superintend- 
ent's secretary during the day and his door- 
man a popular college athlete. So after a 
year's experimentation he recommends the 
scheme to any showman who is located in 
a town that has a school large enough to 
draw upon. This does not necessarily mean 
a college town. The same idea might be 
applied to any student body. 

Fred Hinds is a new contributor to the 
Round Table Club and we're mighty glad 
to broadcast this seasoned showman's ideas. 
He's been in the game for quite some time 
and knows his way 'round. We'll be on 
the lookout for further news of what's go- 
ing on in showbusiness out his way. 



TAYLOR. BERMAN AND 
BREARTON PUT OVER 
A STRONG CAMPAIGN 

A most effective tie-up was recently engi- 
neered on "Prosperity" by Messrs. Taylor, 
Berman and Brearton of Shea's Buffalo 
Theatre, Buffalo, N. Y., through cooperation 
of the Sears-Roebuck store, a chain restau- 
rant concern and a local dealer in popular 
priced autos. 

The Sears store used several hundred as- 
sorted "Prosperity" banners in all depart- 
ments and give-aways were made of 
"Prosperity Bonds" and guest tickets. The 
60 restaurants in the chain all carried tie-in 



cards and "Prosperity Specials" on menus 
and the auto dealer arranged a parade of 
cars through the principal streets of the 
city and suburbs. A ballyhoo truck carry- 
ing a 24-sheet on either side, a 6-sheet in 
the rear and two 3's on the front, also did 
effective work in the busy section of the city 
during noon and early evening hours. On 
another night the special broadcast by 
Marie Dressier over the Fleischman hour 
was delivered through a large Philco at the 
front of the theatre. 

Seems as though we can detect the fine 
hand of Charles Taylor in the above tie-ups 
and wonder if it's the same Taylor we knew 
in the "old days." If so — howdy, "Frank 
Elliott," and we know he'll know what that's 
all about. At any rate, credit to all con- 
cerned and here's hoping to hear some more 
news concerning show-selling efforts put 
forth by the crew at Shea's Buffalo. 



MURRAY ALPER PUT 
OVER AN EFFECTIVE 
THREE-WAY TIE-UP 

It's been some time since we've been able 
to report on the activities of Murray Alper, 
manager of the Commodore Theatre, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., but recent advice bears 
out that he's still carrying on at the same 
old stand. 

One of his recent show-selling stunts con- 
sisted of working out a three-way tie-up 
for "Life Begins," which is illustrated in 
the accompanying photo. All the props 
shows were promoted from a maternity 
hospital, a surgical appliance company and 
a concern that handled supplies for babies. 
A wax figure of a woman and baby were 
placed in the bed and an incubator and 
other maternity ward accessories, such as 
identification beads, etc., were on display. 
Two nurses, furnished by the hospital, were 
in attendance at all times. 

When he played "Horsefeathers" a three- 
sheet of the Marx Brothers was placed in a 




shadow box in the foyer, with a "peanut 
background" and copy reading, "We're 
Nuts to You." Letters were cut from 
beaverboard. This material was further 
utilized currently by placing same on two 
peanut vending stands nearby the theatre. 

Okay, Murray, and let's hear more often 
from you in the weeks to come. You and 
the other fellows on the Randforce circuits 
have been doing some effective work, ac- 
cording to reports, and we want to pass 
word of your activities along the line. 



Freedman Goes to Radio City! 

Zack Freedman, former manager of the 
Audubon Theatre, New York City, has 
joined the Radio City staff and will act as 
assistant to Leon Leonidoff, director of pro- 
duction. 



January 7,1933 



ROUND TABLE CLUB 



51 



STUDY LOCAL SALES ANCLES OF 
EACH PICTURE; THEN CO AHEAD 



Determine What Selling Points 
Are Best for Your Own Cam- 
paign; What New Slants to 
Give if to Command Appeal 

by Harry C. Browne 

ALMOST every picture produced has 
some sales angle, which, if given 
the proper thought, will present some 
definite punch to bring home to your public. 
Read your synopsis if you have no oppor- 
tunity to see the picture in advance. Digest 
the story and its high lights, study the cast, 
and fit each character into the story. Pick 
the outstanding thing in that picture, 
whether it be theme, story, author, cast, or 
characterization, and go to work. 

What angle will appeal to your own situ- 
ation and to your patrons the most. What 
new form can you put this campaign into, 
so that it will not be hackneyed and time 
worn? Get the minds of your organization 
at work. I have received some great ideas 
from some of my ushers. Don't overlook 
anyone's thoughts in the matter of exploita- 
tion. One man cannot conceive and execute 
alone, without getting into a sameness of 
effort. 

Lobbies and Windows 

Lobbies and windows are as good as 
twenty-four sheets if properly executed. If 
you can animate these displays, they have 
three times the value of a silent display. 
You can do wonders with a small motor and 
a few belts attached to movable displays. 
If it is only a cut-out of Joe E. Brown open- 
ing and closing his mouth, you have an ad 
that will stop prospective ticket buyers, and 
create a laugh at the moving caricature of 
that popular player, what he is playing in 
and where he is playing. If you can add 
atmospheric backgrounds and foregrounds, 
you immediately supply the theme of the 
picture and its story, enough to intrigue the 
ticket buyers. 

Even though you have no art department, 
you can resort to three sheets, six sheets, 
twenty-four sheets and other means for at- 
tractive cutouts. Plain silver, gold or other 
colored flitter will give you a screaming 
background, which will attract in daylight 
or under lights. A few yards of black oil 
cloth with block silver flitter letters will 
give you a marquee valance of attractive 
brilliance. You can block these letters in 
with a ruler so that they will all be uniform, 
cover the markings with glue and sprinkle 
the flitter on. When dry it is ready to hang. 
I have found that these oil cloth banners can 
be soaked, the flitter removed and ground 
up and used again and again. The cost is 
negative when used in this manner. 

Animation Effective 

Animation in lobbies and windows is 
even more effective in attraction and sales 
value. You will need the help of a man 
with a mechanical mind. In almost every 
town there is some mechanical genius who 
is always ready for experiments and who 



Harry C. Browne, author of the 
accompanying article and manager 
of the Fox-Stanford Theatre, Palo 
Alto, Calif., is a practical showman 
of many years experience. He never 
advertises or exploits a picture with- 
out thoroughly digesting its possi- 
bilities for local adaptation. He plans 
his work, as all of us should do, then 
works his plan. We believe the ac- 
companying paragraphs offer many 
fine and practical ideas on localized 
selling, from the mind of a theatre 
man who has made a close study of 
the points outlined on this page. 



will readily work with you in the conception 
of attractive displays. I am very fortunate 
in having Ray Hardy, our maintenance 
man, who is a genius at moving displays. 
It is true we do not use them too often. 
We save them for big punches, and in so 
doing they mean more to us than when used 
repeatedly. A small motor, different sized 
gear wheels and arms and belts to run off 
the wheels are the equipment needed for 
this type of display. 

Copy for imprint on your displays must 
not be the "SAME OLD STORY" with the 
same old adjectives and the same old 
phrases. Fit your copy to your ideas on 
the punch of the picture you are selling. I 
am afraid that the selling copy in all adver- 
tising, whether it be newspaper, program or 
display, is getting too much in the repetitive 
strain. We must radically change the tune 
for old tunes are becoming too familiar and 
the public know all the phrases by heart. 
We are selling merchandise, no matter how 
intangible it may be, and we must serve 
appetizers before the regular fare comes on. 
How hungry the public will be for the 
big meal, depends on the appetizers you 
offer. Therefore you must "PLAN YOUR 
WORK, AND WORK TO THAT 
PLAN," and the results will show. 

Variety! 

When a certain type of display wears out, 
have another type of work ready to replace 
it. At the present time we are planning to 
go into papier-mache work, using heads and 
figures, and depicting actual punch scenes 
from the picture, taken from stills. When 
we get this ready and perfected, doing all 
our own work, we will have an entirely new 
method of selling, in our territory. With 
art backgrounds and the actual reproduc- 
tions of the characters in the picture we can 
stop any one and also offer a merchant a 
great and attractive tieup for his best 
windows. 

The foregoing sales medium puts punch 
in your lobbies and your merchants' win- 
dows; it attracts the eyes, and if intriguing 
enough will whet the appetite of the public. 
But you must keep your thoughts also on 
your newspaper advertising, and the many 
other angles of advertising and exploitation 
which your situation calls for. Work with 
your various clubs and civic organizations 



Avoid Campaign Duplication 
And Hackneyed Stunts; Di- 
gest These Effective Slants 
From a Practical Showman 

in your community. Talk to your service 
clubs on the making of talking pictures, on 
sound, on the making of cartoons, on th^ 
reaction of the public to stars and to their 
screen vehicles. After a talk to a service 
club, I generally call for questions, regard- 
ing our business or the making of pictures. 
This has been a big asset to our theatre, 
and we have received lots of publicity and 
loads of good will from this one angle alone. 

Watch Sex Angles! 

Be careful of the SEX angle, especially 
in the smaller communities. It does not sell 
in my town, and has always seemed to be 
detrimental to the success of a picture. I 
think that we offend more with the sex 
angle than we attract. We can sell more 
tickets with George Arliss, Marie Dressier, 
Will Rogers, Janet Gaynor and Charles 
Farrell, than with all the sexy pictures com- 
bined. In the home loving communities, 
there is no question, they want their enter- 
tainment clean and wholesome, with comedy, 
thrills, romance and a few sobs. Those 
pictures spell BOX OFFICE SUCCESS, 
and they will never die. They make your 
theatre popular. 

"The American Family" 

They bring you family trade, for there is 
no offense to the children or Grandma or 
to Mother and Dad. And after all, it is 
the American Family that we are catering 
to, and to whom we are industriously trying 
to sell our entertainment. Keep your house 
service up, keep your public contact em- 
ployees on their toes, do not let your service 
lag, resell every patron, struggle to have 
your patrons believe in you and have faith 
in you, so that they will respond to the 
things you say to them on your screen and 
in your newspapers, and in your displays. 
Play fair with your merchants, so that you 
can always go back for more co-operation. 
Consider it a part of your life to keep 
civilly active. Be a fast moving integral 
part of your community and you cannot fail. 

A great part of our successful work on 
displays lies in our organization. Kenneth 
Miller, our artist, is still on the job. 

Think of all the nice things you would 
want people to do if you were coming to 
a theatre steadily; put yourself in the place 
of the public, and act accordingly, and you 
will get the best out of your situation. 



Madden Still At It! 

A copy of a Norfolk, Va., newspaper dis- 
closes that J. J. Madden, manager of the 
Granby Theatre there, is still able to get 
away with free space, according to a re- 
cently published display ad eleven inches 
deep on three columns. Good work, J. J., 
and more power to you ! 



52 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



WE OFTEN WONDER! By lou sylvester 



Now that repeal 
of the 18th 
Amendment ap- 
pears to be in 
the offing, may- 
be It will come 
to this! 




SOLOMON FOUND AIR 
AND SOUND DEVICE 
GOOD SALES ANGLES 

While newspapers and other advertising 
and publicity mediums functioned in the 
usual, effective manner, perhaps the out- 
standing means used by S. S. Solomon, city 
manager for Publix in Youngstown, Ohio, 
to place "Big Broadcast" before the public, 
were radio announcements and a loud- 
speaking monitor device hooked up on the 
marquee. 

Guessing identity of singers' voices 
broadcast over the air via records and an 
Imitator Contest featured the activities at 
a local radio station and both are credited 
with a goodly share of glory in the final 
check-up. The station presented twelve 5- 
minute periods with introductory announce- 
ments asking listeners-in to name the radio 
star, time the announcement went on air, 
etc., and then ran off one of the records. 
Hundreds of replies were received and the 
deserving names were broadcast over the 
regular "Paramount Chatterbox" period the 
following Wednesday. The other stunt in- 
vited listeners-in to come to the station 
and give auditions in imitation of Kate 
Smith, Bing Crosby or the Mills Brothers. 
The best of the lot were chosen for appear- 
ance on a special program and were named 
guests of the Paramount Theatre. 

The newspaper campaign, in addition to 
five advance ads, included three extra co- 
operative stories tying in the radio station 
stunts; two feature stories in each paper 
because of preview election night show ; six 
write-ups in each paper ; two 2-column and 
five 1 -column cuts and regular current ads. 
At the election night preview much inter- 
est among the audience was centered on the 
electrically rigged Donkey and Elephant 
placed at one side of stage, alternately 
blinking electric eyes as returns came in. 

Obtaining an extra monitor from another 
local theatre outstanding music from the 
picture was transmitted from the monitor 
in the booth to one rigged on the marquee, 



using two lines from booth monitor with 
storage battery and a switch control in the 
manager's office. As stated above, this stunt 
didn't cost a farthing and was most effec- 
tive. 

Additional effort included extensive snip- 
ing of "Radio Stars Magazine," placing of 
one hundred 22x28's advance and currently 
in window tie-ups; attraction letters on 
marquee one week prior, as well as six- 
sheet board on barricade ; two 6-sheets on 
side of building ; grocery store and market 
tie-up for distribution of circulars ; mention 
of picture over Time Service ; special fea- 
ture story in Italian- American newspaper ; 
special front and art work in lobby ; dis- 
tribution of 350,000 slips through tie-up 
made with large chain store concern ; 'phone 
calls to suburban families first two days, 
and the usual trailer advertising. 

Proved His Point! 

Despite exceptionally strong opposition 
Solomon and his crew came through with 
high honors by virtue of the campaign out- 
lined above and, as stated in the opening 
paragraph, proved to their satisfaction that 
the air and other media akin to theme of 
the picture were stronger and more appro- 
priate methods of enlisting public interest. 
More from this energetic showman at a 
future date. 



STILL TIME ENOUGH 
TO STAGE BENEFIT 
SUCH AS KOPPLIN'S 

Although the popular season for giving 
relief and remembrances are past for 1932 
our best informed experts on economics 
advise that tough times are still with us and 
that a whole lot of folk are in dire need; 
hence, we're passing along a few words 
about the Relief Festival recently engineered 
by Harold Kopplin, of Wometco Theatres, 
Miami, Fla. 

For seven days four of the Wolfson- 
Meyer houses — the Capitol, Grove, Bilt- 



more and Tower — admitted two persons tor 
one admission plus some article of food for 
the needy. Salvation Army attendants 
were on hand to accept the articles and it 
only takes a few glances at a number 
newspaper tear sheets to become entirely 
convinced that the event was an unqualified 
success. The committee in charge consisted 
of Messrs. Meyer and Wolfson, Captain 
Stephan, Harold Kopplin, Jack Fink, How- 
ard Morris, Nelson Tower, John M. Shep- 
herd and Edgar Pearce. 

We're right along with Kopplin when he 
states that the above is a corking method 
of creating additional good will for any 
theatre and, at the same time, a consequent 
booster of box ofiice receipts. Conditions 
certainly lend to any movements for relief 
and we've had the pleasure of recording a 
great deal of work along these lines by many 
of our Club members, which, we sincerely 
believe, will not do them or their theatres 
one bit of harm. As far as we can see 
newspaper publicity alone is worth the ef- 
fort, to say nothing of the finest sort of good 
will advertising. 



ANIMATED DISPLAY 
HARRINGTON USED 
WAS EFFECTIVE AID 

With all respect due H. D. Harrington, 
assistant manager of the Princess Theatre, 
Harriman, Tenn., for his proficiency with a 
kodak, we don't believe for one moment 
that the accompanying photo of a front he 
made for "Washington Merry-Go-Round" 
does anywhere near full justice to the sub- 
ject. 

The photo represents the entrance to the 
theatre, with circular portion cut from 
compo-board. The circle behind Lee 
Tracy's head was animated so that when 
it turned it produced a peculiar, mystifying 




appearance of lines coming and going from 
nowhere. The entire front was painted red, 
white and blue and topped off with bunting 
of the same colors. Harrington also had a 
record made up and projected the sound 
through the moving disc. 

Newspaper Aid 

Plenty of enthusiasm was built up for the 
picture through a unique newspaper ad- 
vertising campaign and when the patrons 
came down-town they were all set to go for 
the show in a big way. With the picture 
showing in a 500 seat house in a town of 
30,000 population, where there's plenty of 
competition, Harrington and T. W. Lewis 
deserve plenty of credit for turning in such 
a profitable three-day run. A good sound 
display and newspaper advertising did the 
trick, advises Harrington. We'll tell you 
more about what these two showmen are 
doing in future issues. 



January 7,1933 



ROUND TABLE CLUB 



53 



liti 



ED BENHAM 

veteran independent theatre operator who 
went Circuit for a number of years, re- 
cently reverted to type by taking over 
Smith's Theatre, Yuba City, Calif. 

V 

K. SLIMAN 

is the sole owner and operator of the 
Evangeline Theatre, New Iberia, La., re- 
placing Elias Elias, former manager. 

V 

CHESTER W. McLEAN 
assistant manager of the Publix-Paramount 
Theatre, Providence, R. I., for the past 
three years, was recently promoted to the 
post of manager of the Imperial Theatre, 
another Publix house in Pawtucket. 

V 

JOSEPH PORTEE 

former associate of Joe Weil, publicity 
director of Universal Pictures, New York 
City, is confined to Parsons Hospital, 
Flushing, L. I. His friends are invited to 
drop him a line. 

V 

HARVEY COX 

is the new manager of the Paramount 
Theatre, Marion, Ind., replacing H. Sulli- 
van, transferred to South Bend. 

V 

JAMES WALKER 

owner of the Irvington Theatre, Indian- 
apolis, Ind., is deep in the problems of 
relief work. He has directed the feeding 
of over 200 families for the past two years 
and is getting a big kick out of the work. 

V 

LAWRENCE S. STEIN 
formerly manager of Warner's Parthenon 
Theatre, has been appointed director of 
advertising and publicity for the entire 
Warner circuit of Chicago theatres, in- 
cluding the Capitol and Avalon. 

V 

E. BOCK 

formerly manager of the State Theatre, 
Dayton, Ohio, closed by RKO during De- 
cember, is now holding down the job of 
assistant-manager-treasurer at the Lyric, 
Cincinnati, 

V 

C. KOLSTADT 

former chief of service at the Temple Thea- 
tre, Rochester, N. Y., recently replaced 
Louis Friedman, resigned, as assistant- 
manager-treasurer at that house. 

V 

M. SANDUSKY 

recently replaced Eugene Brassil as assist- 
ant-manager-treasurer of the RKO 81st 
Street Theatre, New York City. 

V 

MICHAEL DALY 

is in charge of the New Rialto Theatre, 
reopened Xmas Day in New Britain, Conn. 
Daly is associated with William De Luco 
In a new corporation recently formed to 
operate the Liberty, Hartford, and the 
newly acquired Rialto. 



ARTHUR LUCAS 

well known theatre operator down in 
Georgia, has been appointed by Gov. Rus- 
sell a member of the State Board of Con- 
trol. 

V 

BILL RAYNOR 

and Nat Holt, respectively heads of the 
New England and Cleveland divisions for 
RKO, recently led all other divisions in 
the Seven Day Business Drive. 

V 

MORRIS SUSSMAN 

remains as manager of the Empire Theatre, 
Bronx, N. Y., recently taken over by RKO. 

V 

ROBERT TITUS 

has succeeded Earle Belcia as skipper of 
the RKO Royal Theatre, New York City. 

V 

TED THOMAS 

formerly with RKO In Cleveland, has been 
transferred to Keith's Theatre, Flushing. 

V 

ARNOLD RITTENBERG 
formerly publicity man for RKO In Albany, 
N. Y., has replaced Ackerman J. Gill as 
manager of Proctor's Theatre, Troy, N. Y. 
Gill takes the place of Herbert Morgan 
as manager of Proctor's in Schnectady, 
N. Y. 

V 

M. SILBERMAN 

proprieter of the Columbia Theatre, Mil- 
waukee, has taken over operation of the 
Park, suburban house formerly under man- 
agement of C. Roddy. 

V 

N. KELLY 

has been appointed manager of the re- 
cently reopened West End Theatre, Es- 
saness house in Chicago. 

V 

HARRY HATFIELD 

has succeeded Charles Durrell as manager 
of the American Theatre, Chicago Essaness 
house. 

V 

W. C. SMITH 

is the new manager of the Embassy Thea- 
tre, another Essaness house in Chicago, 
succeeding Jack Wohl. 

V 

EDDIE SEGUIN 

recently left the RKO Publicity Department 
in Chicago and is doing promotional work 
for Balaban & Katz. 



Items for publication on this page should 
be confined to theatre notes only. Address 
them to "Chick" Lewis and they will be 
published the week following receipt. Pro- 
motions, transfers, changes of address, 
acquiring of theatres, etc., etc., is the 
type of material we want. . 



LEO JONES 

operator of the Star Theatre, Upper San- 
dusky, Ohio, recently took over the Cort 
Theatre, Bellefontalne, Ohio, formerly op- 
erated by Harry Moeller. 

V 

ROGER HURLOCK * 
proprietor of the Imperial Theatre, Balti- 
more, recently took over the New Superba 
Theatre in that city from M. Masek and 
renamed it the Majestic. 

V 

BERT ADKINS 

Is again associated with Loew's Century 
Theatre, Baltimore, after a brief hook-up 
with Harry Hankel, manager of Ford's 
Theatre. 

V 

ELMER C. RHODEN 

recently headed a delegation from the 
Fox-Midwest division in Kansas City which 
attended district meetings In Topeka, 
Wichita and Sedalla. 

V 

VINTON ELLIOTT 

former amusement park operator, recently 
acquired lease on the Bijou Theatre, Kan- 
sas City, and reopened Xmas Eve. 

V 

GEORGE BAKER 

manager of the Publix-Newman Theatre, 
Kansas City, was host to children from 20 
local Institutions at a Xmas matinee spon- 
sored bv the KIwanlans. 

V 

NELSON HAMPTON 

for the past two years manager of the 
Rialto Theatre, Birmingham, Ala., was re- 
cently promoted by R. 6. Wilby to take 
charge of the newly acquired Strand and 
Galax Theatres, in addition to his duties 
at the Rialto. 

V 

C. C. WOOTEN 

manager of the Metropolitan Theatre, 
Houston, Texas, has also been placed in 
charge of the reopened .Queen Theatre 
in that city. 

V 

A. P. MEININGER 

manager of the Rivoll Theatre, Toledo, is 
leaving his post because of ill health. Harry 
Feldman, treasurer, will take charge until 
a new manager is appointed. 

V 

BEN COHEN 

recently returned to the Paramount Thea- 
tre, New Haven., as director of adver- 
tising. 

V 

E. R. BRENNAN 

has succeeded Tom Burdeau as manager 
of the Fox Theatre, Marinette, Wis. Bur- 
deau has returned to St. Louis. 

V 

MARTIN SCHLESSINGER 

has taken over operation of the Soledad 

Theatre, Soledad, Calif. 



54 



MOTION PICTU RE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 




ORGANIST GOOKIN 
DOUBLES AS STAGE 
MANAGER AND P. A. 

Canned music may have cost a lot of 
organists their jobs but it turned one con- 
sole manipulator into a stage manager and 
associate publicity man, in addition to do- 
ing regular duty at the pipes. We refer to 

G. A. Gookin, one 
of the staff at the 
Majestic Theatre, 
Johnson City, 
Tenn., who re- 
cently contributed 
a brief account of 
what has been go- 
ing on of late in 
showbusiness down 
his way. 

When "Movie 
Crazy" came to town Gookin left his organ 
long enough to devise a dummy motion pic- 
ture camera, which he mounted on the back 
of the rumble seat of a coupe. He then 
sallied forth among the credulous Johnson 
Citians and proceeded to "shoot" them. 
"Curiosity, vanity and eagerness to get in 
front of a movie camera is all in favor of 
the ballyhoo crew," advises Gookin. A 
great gag if you can get away with it, say 
we ! 

Enlisting of local and adjacent town 
vaudeville talent is another one of G. A.'s 
features. He runs these shows on Saturday 
nights and 'though operating over a period 
of ten months few repeats have been neces- 
sary. Consistent billing of city neighbor- 
hoods and neighboring towns recruit new 
talent as needed, which he rehearses and 
coaches to meet requirements of the man- 
agement. A Master of Ceremonies officiates 
each vaudeville night and with an organ 
accompaniment to all acts the presentation 
goes over in a big way. Awards from $5 
down to guest tickets are made to the con- 
testants. 

We believe this is the first time we've 
had the pleasure of getting a line on what 
one of the fellows with Johnson City Enter- 
prises is doing to earn his daily bread and 
hope it's just a forerunner of what's to come 
from both Gookin and others with that con- 
cern. Shoot your ideas along, fellows. 



HELP WANTED! 

At the request of a number of Club 
members we are addressing an urgent ap- 
peal to Round Tablers so situated that they 
are limited to use of weekly or bi-weekly 
newspaper advertising to send in examples 
of their layouts, so that we can complete 
an assortment for presentation in full page 
form. 

In the meantime, we ask those who have 
from time to time requested this informa- 
tion to be patient for a short time. We 
promise it won't be long now. 



CLASSIFIED TIE-UP 
GAVE DICK WRIGHT 
LOT OF FREE SPACE 

A tie-up made with classified department 
of a newspaper during the pre-Xmas sea- 
son netted considerable free space for Dick 
Wright, manager of the Strand Theatre, 
Akron, Ohio. 

Each day the paper published a jingle on 
the classified page, such as: "If Mother's 
Wish Is for a Lamp — If Baby Wants a 
Doll— If Father Often Speaks of Ties." . . . 
The last word of the fourth line of each 
jingle was concealed among the Xmas Gift 
ads, each letter in parentheses, and the idea 
was to make it complete and send same in 
to the department. The gag netted Dick 
25 inches of free display ad space each 
week. 

Another stunt that went over well for 
"You Said a Mouthful" was having two 
girls in sailor costumes distribute 6,000 
samples of locally manufactured pretzels in 
sealed glassine bags on day of pre-view. 
The writer just had a "mouthful" of a sam- 
ple and doesn't doubt for one moment that 
the tasty little crackers went over in a 
big way. Postal Telegraph boys also aided 
with distribution. 

Classified ad page tie-ups have proven 
popular with many Club members and a 
variety of gags have been used to gain read- 
ers' attention. Wright's jingle idea was a 
good one, it seems to us. His "Mouthful" 
stunt also sounds particularly adaptable and 
one doesn't have to live next door to a 
pretzel house to work out something sim- 
ilar; lots of other things that people like to 
munch. 



OLSEN USED MOTOR 
BALLY TO EXPLOIT 
FILM IN DENMARK 

It may be somewhat late to report on 
exploitation for "Crowd Roars" in this 
country, but over in Copenhagen, where 
John Olsen manages the Warner branch, 
the film is not quite so antique. 




Pictured here is the racing car that Olsen 
had driven through the streets for six hours 
every day for six days preceding opening 
of picture. Atop the car was a comet- 
shaped sign with title of picture, name of 
theatre and playdate lettered in Danish. 

Additional effort included distribution of 
5,000 teasers in English in convenient 
spots on premises where the British exhibi- 
tion was being held. These were also 
handed out to the crews of the English war- 
ships stationed there at that time. The 
picture enjoyed a profitable run of eleven 
days at the Coliseum Theatre. 

The Club is always glad to receive news 
from foreign shores and we'll look for- 
ward to hearing more about what Olsen 
is doing to plug Warner product in his 
territory. 



Yovim's Special Herald 

In an effort to round up trade from Xmas 
shoppers and children, J. A. Yovim, man- 
ager of the Liberty Theatre, Tacony, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., issued a one-sheet size card- 
board herald which read: "Send the Kids 
to the Movies While You Do Your Xmas 
Shopping — and — Don't Forget the Movies 
Are Good for You and That Tired Feeling 
After Shopping — Come On and Relax" 
(Theatre and Address). Printing was done 
in green and red on white background. 



Club Index for Month of December 



Herewith we list the many items of exploitation, etc., which appeared on the Club pages during the month 
of December. By keeping this issue close at hand you can refer to it whenever necessary as a means of locat- 
ing some particular form of show-selling. We hope our members and readers are finding this service useful. 
The Club would welcome suggestions to improve it. 



Item Issue Page 

Aeroplane Tie-up 24th 53 

Anniversaries 3rd 46 

10th 71 

17th 62 

31st 71 

Benefits 31st 60 

Christmas Stunts 17 58 

31st 68 

College Tie-ups 31st 62 

Contests 17th 54 

Cooperative Ads 17th 62 

17th 63 

24th 47 

31st 77 

Displays 10th 64 

24th 44 

24th 47 

31st 76 

Election Stunts 17th 63 

Feature Campaigns ... 3rd 54 

10th 64 

10th 66 

10th 68 

17th 55 

17th S7 



Item Issue Page 

Campaigns (Cont'd) 17th 59 

24th 46 

31st 60 

31st 64 

31st 68 

31st 70 

31st 71 

Fire Department Tie-up. 3rd 53 

31st 60 

Fronts 10th 64 

10th 71 

17th 56 

17th 62 

24th 52 

31st 71 

31st 71 

Giveaways 3rd 45 

Heralds 3rd 48 

Institutional Plugs 17th 59 

Kiddie Biz 10th 70 

31st • 64 

Lobbies 3rd 52 

10th 70 

31st 70 

31st 71 



Item Issue Page 

Lobbies (Cont'd) 31st 71 

Merchant Tie-up 17th 54 

17th 59 

24th 53 

Newspaper Ads 3rd 48 

3rd 49 

3rd 52 

3rd 54 

10th 65 

17th 64 

31st 78 

Novelty Gags 3rd 49 

10th 65 

10th 67 

17th 58 

24th 46 

24th 48 

Post Office Tie-up... 3rd 44 

Poster Work 10th 67 

10th 72 

17th 60 

24th 52 

31st 71 

Premieres 24th 48 

Special Nites 3rd 45 



Item Issue Psige 

Special Stories 
About Printers Ink- 
Dan Krendel 10th 69 

Avoiding Liability— 

M. Berger 10th 70 

Across The City 

Desk 17th 57 

Theatre Front— Irv- 
ing Sinclair 17th 60 

Start New Year Right 

—Hugh Borland ..24th 49 
Do People Read Your 
Ads?— E. S. C. Cop- 
pock 31st 66 

Stage Weddings 31st 74 

Street Ballys 3rd 52 

10th 69 

17th 63 

24th 50 

31st 62 

31st 74 

Trade Review Gag.... 17th 54 

Window Displays .... 3rd 45 

10th 65 

24th 52 



January 7,1933 



ROUND TABLE CLUB 



55 



ANSWERING SMALL TOWN THEATRE 
OPERATION FROM THE FIRING LINE 



Tom and Mrs. Connie Edwards 
Offer Variety of Selling Ideas 
For the Exhibitor Who Oper- 
ates in Smaller Communities 

WE'RE always glad to hear from Tom 
Edwards, who, with his wife, Mrs. 
Connie Edwards, operates the Ozark 
Theatre, Eldon, Mo.; for his letters, even 
though far apart, appear to carry the answer 
to smalltown theatre operation. Maybe it's 
Mrs. Edwards who is the guiding genius; 
maybe it's Tom's wide experience as an erst- 
while film salesman (he may still be doubling 
as one). Anyway, the Ozark clicks along at 
a merry rate despite the universal cry of 
hard times — mainly because Tom and Con- 
nie are forever giving it a cheerful little 
push. 

To begin with they go after kiddie pat- 
ronage and good will in a whole-hearted 
way; not so much on account of actual cash 
returns, for we all know that isn't so much, 
but for the vast amount of good children 
can accomplish in many ways for a theatre. 
Various clubs have been^ organized to meet 
at Saturday matinees, the last one called 
Tom's Club and used to plug serials. For 
instance, he gave every kid in town a chance 
to see the first chapter for one cent and with 
the incidental adult trade did within two 
dollars of business accounted for the pre- 
vious Saturday. 

Sliding Scale! 

Tom told the youngsters that the next 
episode would cost them two cents; the 
third, three cents, etc., on up to the tenth, 
which would rate the usual 10 cents, pro- 
viding they didn't miss any of the chapters. 
If that happened, their cards were voided. 
He caught more kiddie patronage than ever 
before and, incidentally, more adult trade 
at 25 cents per copy. He plays a Western 
at the matinee and then spots it again after 
the regular nine o'clock show Saturday 
night, advertising "Come at 9 ; Stay Till 12 ; 
See Two Shows for the Price of One." So 
he gets most of the kids back again for 
the first show Saturday night; and do the 
farmers like the idea of two shows for the 
price of one ! It's kept Saturday business 
'way up. According to an announcement he 
made, the next time a serial is started 500 
pennies are to be thrown from the top of 
the marquee, just to make sure that most 
every kid will have a penny for the first 
show. He tried a similar gag one time on 
the grown-ups by throwing live chickens 
off the marquee and the stunt more than 
stopped traffic. 

A Trick Horse! 

When looking through an issue of "Child 
Life," Tom came across instructions on 
how to build a trick horse and adapted the 
idea to "Horsefeathers." A P. S. in his 
letter informs us that he sent the plans 
along, but we'll be darned if we can find 
same. Anyway, he took the heads and title 
off the regular one-sheet to further carry 
out the scheme. Credit for constructing the 
horse goes to Tom's operator, who is also 
a good carpenter. Credit for all excitement 




Here is a tried and proven attention 
gag wherein the youngster hangs the 
horse over his shoulders in suspender 
fashion and propels himself with his own 
feet. The impression remains that he is 
really sitting on the dummy horse. 

in the theatre when the horse first made its 
appearance goes to Tom's nine-year-old 
son, who rode the gadget across the stage 
and put it through all kinds of trick danc- 
ing, falls, bucking, trotting and whatnot. 
It was a riot, according to reports. Any 
further information on this gag will have 
to come from Tom himself, as all we have 
at hand is a small snapshot too faint to 
reproduce. 

The Edwardes also held their Annual 
Bathing Beauty show this season with even 
greater success than last. Maybe the rest 
of you will recall that each year the Ed- 
wardses sponsor the selection of "Miss Lake 
of the Ozarks." Mrs. Connie has charge of 
this stunt and we're here to let you know 
that she does a bang-up job. Goes out and 
sells the merchants, promotes cooperative 
advertising, stages the entire show, etc. As 
the year previous, K. C. and St. Louis 
papers picked up the photos for their roto 
pages. A Fashion Show was also pulled 
off this year, but Tom foregoes sending de- 
tails, stating that it was conducted much 
the same as similar shows outlined in Club 
pages from time to time. He strongly rec- 
ommends such a show for a general trade 
reviver. 

Effective Calendar! 

Now we come to the Edwards monthly 
calendar, which is just a bit different than 
the regular run of these popular show ad- 
vertising mediums. About 4,000 of these 
are issued each month and have been so 
well received that people phone in and reg- 
ister a kick if they don't get them. Ten 
people are called each day until 10 cor- 
rectly name the picture showing at the the- 
atre on that day. Every single pass thus 
far given out has brought in an extra ad- 
mission to the house. Some folks have told 
Tom that they keep the calendar right above 
the phone and never fail to look at it be- 
fore lifting the receiver. Dates on the card 
are well spaced and permit room for the 
original catchlines Tom makes up. 

On that same calendar Edwards an- 
nounced another one of his gags which, he 
states, is going great guns. Copy read : 
"When I was young my mother dropped me 



Their Ideas Must Be Practical 
Because Their Theatre Clicks 
Along at a Pleasing Pace 
Despite Cry of Tough Times! 

on my head and that is the only excuse I 
can give for selling $1 bills for 40c. Don't 
miss Tom's 'Tom Foolery' Auction Sales 
on Wednesday and Thursday and buy 50 
cents worth of sugar for 16 cents. — Tom." 
Or, "Don't Miss Tom's Auction Sale, when 
he will give you $5 if he doesn't lose 50 
cents on any article of staple groceries. $1 
Bills as Low as 40 cents." 

He generally starts off his Sale by auc- 
tioneering off a $1 bill, usually receiving 
about 75 cents for it. Then he auctions off 
the 75 cents for about 40 cents, and so on 
until the dollar has completely disappeared. 
Then he starts on groceries and advertises 
that articles will not be sold for over half 
what they are actually worth. Everything 
is a Bargain, bought from local stores at 
a substantial reduction, although Tom thinks 
the merchandise might be promoted. When 
the merchandise, etc., is presented to the 
patron, either Tom or the doorman takes 
the article down to the winner in order 
not to embarrass him by forcing appear- 
ance on the stage. 

Stilling Using Cards! 

Yes, he's still using birthday cards for 
the school children and thinks it's an excel- 
lent gag for any town. You know what he 
means — a tickler file full of names and birth 
dates, so a pass can be mailed as a reminder 
of the extraordinary occurrence. 

A post card size multistamp has also been 
found a great help when in a hurry to get 
out some special message at the last mo- 
ment. For instance, he had a circus against 
him one Saturday night and at first decided 
to take it on the chin. About 30 minutes 
before show time that night he determined 
to fight it out, got out his multistamp and 
made up some cards announcing a special 
show at 10 :45 P. M., directly after close 
of the circus. Then he went to the show- 
grounds, secured permission from those in 
charge to pass out the circulars as the peo- 
ple went in and, consequently, picked up 
about $25 more than he Teceived the pre- 
vious Saturday night. Imagine his embar- 
rassment. He also uses that stamp to date 
all heralds and for imprinting backs of ex- 
change heralds and other small pamphlets. 

Popular Humor! 

In line with the popular brand of bath- 
room humor, such as presented in publica- 
tions such as "Ballyhoo" for the edification 
of a considerable number of Americans these 
days, Tom advises us, just as he went to 
press with his letter, that Eldon, Mo., and 
Times Square are not so far apart on belly 
laughs, judging from the response he re- 
ceived from getting out a toilet paper her- 
ald-for-men-only on "Movie Crazie," 
whereon was inscribed "Wipe that frown 
off your face — laugh with Harold Lloyd," 
etc. Distribution of 250 regulation diapers 

{CorUinued on following page) 



56 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



GOODMAN SENDS US 
THEATRE NEWS FROM 
FAR EASTERN CITIES 

From Manila, P. I., a short time ago 
came an envelope containing data on a few 
goings-on in show business in the Far East, 
including China, Straits Settlements and 
India. A return address up in the left hand 
corner — D. Goodman, Manila, P. O. Box 
423 — no more no less, is the only clue we 
have of the sender. Okay for that ! Now 
let's see what some of our foreign brothers 
have been up to: 

Note the reproduction of a full page on 
"Congorilla." It is part of a special section 
published by Movie Weekly, a Chinese 
paper with a subscription circulation of 
7,000 and street sale of 3,000 copies. One 
copy was mailed to every theatre in China 
by presumably the Fox Theatre interests 
over there. Three thousand were printed 
one side only and sniped all over Shanghai. 
Translate the copy yourselves, it's too much 
for us ! 

Small Figures! 

The other photo showing what appears 
to be a 24-sheet posted on a dilapidated 
shack in Shanghai is interesting in that it 
portrays the Chinese or Japanese idea of 
proportions of figures representing the hero 
and heroine in the right hand end of poster. 
Note the diminutiveness of the figures, 
which more or less corresponds to the small 
stature of local inhabitants. As above, we'll 
leave it to our readers to interpret the bal- 
ance of the 24-sheet. 

On to Bombay! 

Continuing our sight-seeing trip in the 
Orient we'll make a stop in Bombay where 
the "Times of India" informs us that Mr. 
Rustomji Dorabji, proprietor of Wellington 
Talkies, is the operator of the city's newest 
and largest cinema. An "Exclusive Pre- 
miere" was a feature of its opening. Local 




newspapers gave the event plenty of pub- 
licity. 

Going over the Straits Settlements and 
picking up a copy of the "Straits Times," 
we get a good idea of space taken to adver- 
tise week-end shows. A full page was given 



Here Is the Oriental 
Idea of How a Twenty- 
Four Sheet Should Look! 




to a variety of entertainment, with "Con- 
gorilla" the centre of attraction. 

As we progress it becomes more and 
more evident that Contributor Goodman 
must have had something to do with the 
effective advertising campaign made in the 
Far East on "Congorilla" ; if we are wrong, 
maybe he'll set us right when next we hear 
from his neck of the world. News from 
correspondents in foreign lands is always 
interesting and we will look forward to 
hearing from Goodman again. 



ANOTHER GAG FROM 
VERSATILE GOOKIN 
DOWN IN TENNESSEE 

Here we are again with the latest show 
news from Johnson City, Tenn., where the 
versatile George A. Gookin, organist, musi- 
cal director, associate publicity manager 
and manager of attractions for the Majestic 
Theatre, regularly treats the town to a 
variety of thrills when exploiting some 
picture. 

With the opening of "Air Mail" in mind 
the resourceful George hied himself around 
to his newspaper friends and sold them the 
idea of running a story to effect that "A 
Message From the Sky" would appear at 
noon time on playdate. He wrote the copy 
himself. 

To make a long story short the papers 
came through with columns of free space 
and stiff necks were the fashion among a 
majority of the pedestrians and other look- 
ers when an airplane appeared over the 
town. The pilot didn't write a message in 
the sky but zoomed over town in the act of 
dropping 5,000 inexpensive throw-aways, 
among which were fifty special circulars. 
Believe it or not, advises Gookin, twenty 
of these were found and returned to the box 
office, despite a brisk wind which carried 
the paper on building tops and out-of-the- 
way places. The entire cost came to $5 for 
the plane hop and $7.50 for throwaways. 

An old gag, admits the energetic George, 
but it worked like a charm and materially 
aided box office receipts. Maybe the ad- 
vance interest he created through newspaper 
publicity was responsible for the large 
amount of interest in the stunt. At any 
rate, more power to our Club member down 
in Johnson City, and we'll be looking for 
further word on his show-selling activities. 



Brenon On His Own 

Herbert Brenon, Jr., formerly in charge 
of a house at Fort Smith, Ark., has leased 
the Playhouse Theatre at Fairhope, Ala. 



DELIS ENGINEERED 
BIG CAMPAIGN FOR 
PALACE REOPENING 

Newspaper, radio and a variety of adver- 
tising and exploitation activities featured 
the campaign made on "Grand Re-Opening 
of the Million Dollar Palace Theatre, Can- 
ton, Ohio, by Manager George Delis." 

Advance action included careful distribu- 
tion of fifteen 24-sheets, two hundred 2- 
sheets, 100 one-half sheet cards and the 
posting of one hundred special window 
cards in all parts of the town and outskirts 
within a radius of thirty miles. A front page 
story was secured in the local newspaper, 
as well as out-of-town papers, concerning 
the reopening and attraction. Newspaper 
advertising was also used in local and out- 
of-town papers 10 days in advance. The 
radio made announcements four times daily 
over a ten-day advance period. 

Additional efforts included placing of 
pieces of linoleum on sidewalks with copy : 
"Step On It — Attend the Grand Reopening 
of the Palace Theatre, Etc." ; promotion of 
a large cooperative ad; use of tire cover 
advertisements ; special front on theatre ; 
special displays in stores; two striking 24- 
sheet cutouts on top of marquee at either 
side ; display of telegrams from RKO stars ; 
miniature cards ; special banners ; signs on 
street cars and buses ; distribution of 5,000 
telegrams via Western Union messengers; 
inserts ; display pennants and special circu- 
lars. 

We have one of the special house-to- 
house cards before us, enclosed in envelope 
and reading : "Howdy Folks ! — Here's a 
Hot Tip For You ! — How to Save Gas, 
Coal and Electricity — Confidential Informa- 
tion and Instructions inside !" The en- 
closed card told them all to "Shut Off the 
Furnace ! Turn Out the Light ! Turn Off 
the Gas ! — And Take the Whole Family to 
See the Show You've Been Waiting For at 
the Palace Theatre." 

Delis also had the cashiers 'phone homes 
three days in advance, arranged for an at- 
tractive floral display in the lobby and used 
a number of other regular advertising 
stunts. 

Certainly, all the action outlined above 
ought to have gotten Delis off to a good 
start with his new venture in the interests 
of A. G. Constant, general manager of the 
Palace and other theatres out Canton way. 
We'll hope to tell you all more about what's 
going on there in future issues and, in the 
meantime, will sign off with sincere wishes 
for success. 



SMALL TOWN OPERATION 

(.Continued from preceding page) 

on the occasion of "Blessed Event" was an- 
other gag that made them chuckle. He also 
had a line in the lobby with all sorts of 
other baby accessories hanging therefrom. 
Tom works on the reliable old theory that 
if you can start them gabbing you'll do 
business, which is undoubtedly a pretty 
good rule to follow. 

Tom says that's all from the Edwardes 
this time and we are forced to echo his 
statement. He has given managers situated 
as he is the lowdown on what it takes to 
build small town patronage. How about 
some of the rest of the gang coming through 
with an exchange of information we can 
pass back to Edwards? 



January 7,1933 



ROUND TABLE CLUB 



57 



SORIERO HELPED BOOST STATE PRODUCT 

The novel idea of mailing a letter typed on a very thin sheet of rolled copper was recently 
put into effect from the Tucson, Arizona, office of Fox West Coast Theatres by District Manager 
Thomas D. Soriero in conjunction with a state-wide move to boost the copper industry with 
newspaper and radio publicity and exhibits at theatres, etc. 

Placing a piece of copper right before the reader's eye, plus the fact that the metal could 
be rolled thinly enough to use in a typewriter, was certainly a corking way to get across a 
message and reflects originality and showmanship from Soriero. 



ELLIS BRODIE WAGED 
EFFECTIVE CAMPAIGN 
ON CURRENT PICTURE 

An old fashioned torchlight parade, nov- 
elty advertising in the form of telegrams, 
tabs, gag cards and elaborate lobby and 
front displays and other effective exploita- 
tion, featured the campaign made on 
"Phantom President" by Ellis Brodie, man- 
ager of the Paramount Theatre, Haverhill, 
Mass. 

Used Telegram Gag! 

Telegrams, supposed to have been sent 
by George M. Cohan, were received and 
read at Kiwanis, American Legion and 
Country Club meetings, as outlined in the 
exploitation manual. The gist of the mes- 




sages was that he (Cohan) was running 
on the laugh ticket and that other candidates 
were taking the campaign too seriously. 

The 5,000 tabloids, secured gratis from 
the advertising department of a Boston 
newspaper, were distributed to patrons as 
they left the theatre one week prior to 
opening. These were folded small as possi- 
ble so that patrons would put them in their 
pockets instead of discarding them in or 
near the theatre entrance. A remarkably 
small number were found outside, proving 
that in a majority of cases the tabs were 
taken home and read. 

Good Advance Campaign! 

A few days in advance of the torchlight 
parade, which was staged the night before 
opening, the front page of the local paper 
was used to insert notices that a big politi- 
cal parade and rally was due on Friday 
night. In addition, a sound truck was ap- 
propriately bannered and records were 
played over its route between 5 and 7 
o'clock. At 7.15 P. M. the parade formed 
in front of the theatre and with the sound 
truck in the van, started its line of march. 
Five autos owned by theatre employees fol- 
lowed with red and green flares. Behind 
the autos came about 50 young fellows, with 
20 of them bearing banners on which were 
slogans such as : "Two Dimes For every 
Nickel," etc. Small political cards were 
distributed, the public address system broad- 
cast the "Schnozzle" comedy campaign 



speech and about a gross of flares were 
burned. 

One thousand "Schnozzle" novelty cards, 
with the movable chain nose, were dis- 
tributed among schools and business estab- 
lishments and proved a corking word-of- 
mouth advertising gag, because everyone 
showed the trick to someone else. 

The small photo will convey a good idea 
of the grotesque looking front and foyer 
display used one week in advance. A very 
elaborate false front was constructed, done 
in a variety of colors and carrying out the 
parade idea with slogans, banners, etc. 
Cutouts of Durante and Cohan were placed 
at either end. 

It seems like old times again to digest one 
of Ellis Brodie's campaigns and we're 
mighty glad to again see his name among 
the articles in this department. This is the 
season for him to come through with a lot 
of good show-selling tips for his fellow Club 
members and we'll be on the lookout for a 
lot more. 



SOMETHING new in cooperative ads is 
always reaching Club headquarters from 
some corner of the country and this time 
honors go to Miss Anna Bell Ward, assist- 
ant general manager of the Phoenix Amuse- 
ment Company, Lexmgton, Ky., for promot- 
ing one of the most novel double trucks we've 
had the pleasure of looking at this season. 

Take a look at the accompanying illus- 
tration and see if you all don't agree that 
Miss Ward hit upon an ingenious method 
to place her current attraction at the Ben 
Ali and names of local merchants before 
the public eye. Lest you cannot read the 
printed rules of the game the idea was to 
fill in names of all states in the U. S. map, 
number of electoral votes, an estimate of 
which way each state would go politically 
and then to color in the map in any way de- 



BROADWAY FRONT! 




Above photo shows the Broadway send- 
off given a Tom Mix film by Lou Brandt, 
manager of Globe Theatre, New York City. 
The entire upper portion of the house was 
covered with a giant banner. What a 
camel had to do with Tom Mix we don't 
know, but one was led by an attendant 
dressed in Indian costume to ballyhoo the 
film, and the stunt attracted plenty of 
attention. 



sired. Guest tickets ranging from one pass 
to a season pass were offered for the best 
and neatest answers. The decision was 
made by an appointed committee of local 
judges and employees of newspaper and 
theatre were barred from entry. 

Rather a neat job, eh, and here's con- 
gratulations to this well known show- 
woman of Kentucky for her share in put- 
ting over such an attractive co-op stunt. 
We know for a fact that she received a com- 
plimentary letter from W. G. Bishop, field 
publicity manager for M-G-M for pro- 
moting such a timely ad that he laid plans 
to use the same idea in other cities. Note 
that each state represented a local mer- 
chant. If you can't adapt the same idea to 
your needs before next election time, save 
it until then. Thank Miss Ward for this. 




A NOVEL NEWSPAPER TIE-UP! 



58 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



MAKE THIS A BANNER YEAR-JOIN! 



MORT GOLDBERG 

hails from out in Los Angeles, Calif., 
where he skippers the Fox-Westlake Thea- 
tre for West Coast Theatres. We are also 
in receipt of his application for mennber- 
ship in the Round Table Club and want 
him to know that we're mighty glad to 
have him with us. Mort has 2,000 seats 
to fill in the Westlake and we're going to 
check up on him until he lets his fellow 
Round Tablers know how he performs this 
feat of showmanship. What say, Mort? 
Drop us a line in the near future. 

V 

CHARLES A. WHYTE 
sends the Club his application for mem- 
bership from far off Haines, Alaska, where 
he holds down the post of co-manager of 
the Coliseum Theatre. His name adds an- 
other to the Farthest North contingent of 
the Round Table and we'll look forward 
to hearing what he and his associates are 
doing to sell shows in their neck of the 
country. Shoot along some information, 
Charlie, for the gang will be interested to 
get a line on showbusiness conditions up 
and around Haines. 

V 

ROY N. WOLFF 

is another Californian to join the ranks of 
the Round Table army and he has charge 
of the Fox-Manchester Theatre in Los 
Angeles. It is also a great pleasure to 
acknowledge his application for Club 
membership and to know that he, too, Is 
heartily in accord with a wish to help keep 
up the good work being done universally 
by every man in this outfit. Let's hear 
from you regularly, Roy, as to what you 
and your staff are doing to boost the box 
office. 

V 

MERRILL F. HANNA 
manages the Hollywood Theatre out in 
Detroit, Mich., and he's still another new 
Club member in line for introduction to 
the rest of this organization. Meet the 
rest of the fellows, Merrill, and then prove 
to all of them that you Intend to do your 
share of the good work by sending along 
some show-selling ideas we can pass along 
the line. What was that last stunt you 
put over that helped boost trade? Shaot 
along an account of it and we'll do the 
rest from this end of the Table. 

V 

TOM M. STEELE 

sends the Club his application for mem- 
bership from Ottawa, Kansas, where he 
performs the dual role of managing the 
Fox-Strand and Webster Theatres. We are 
glad, indeed, to list his name among this 
great army of showmen and hope that 
Steele will find time among his many 
duties to now and then let his fellow show- 
men know what's doing out in his town. 
We'll be looking for his next communica- 
tion. 



A. SLIMAN 

Is located down South In New Iberia, La., 
where he just recently became sole owner 
and manager of the Evangeline Theatre, 
a house formerly managed by Ellas Ellas. 
According to a photo of the Evangeline 
on the letterhead the house is certainly 
good-looking, with its long marquee and 
pretentious upright electric sign. Just as 
soon as Sliman oils up his typewriter, 
we'll be telling you all more about what 
he's doing in showbusiness. 

V 

E. D. DORREL 

is in charge of the Fox Theatre, a Fox- 
Midwesco house at Beatrice, Neb., and 
we're taking this opportunity to acknowl- 
edge his application for membership In 
the Round Table Club. Now that he has 
taken the vow to do his utmost fo help 
keep these pages full of show-selling In- 
formation, we'll await with interest his 
next communication. 

V 

K. L LI 

Is the managing director of the Chalerm 
Krung Theatre, a United Cinema Com- 
pany house in Bangkok, Slam, and it is a 
pleasure to also list his name among the 
Club's new members. Li's application is 
further proof of the International scope 
of this organization's activities and we 
predict readers will be very much inter- 
ested in learning what Is going on In show- 
business over In Bangkok. 



HERE'S THE BLANK 



APPLICATION FOR 
MEMBERSHIP 

MANAGERS' ROUND 
TABLE CLUB 

Hey, "Chick": 

Please enroll me in the Club and 
send me my framed certificate. 

Name 

Position 

Theatre 

Addrest 

City 

State 

(Mall to Managers' Round Table Club, 
1790 Broadway, New York) 



ED BENHAM 

hails from out in Yuba City, California, 
and he is now another duly recorded mem- 
ber of this great organization of showmen. 
Ed broke Into showbusiness back in '13, at 
which time he functioned same as at 
present — as owner-manager. Since that 
time he's worked for the circuits and re- 
cently completed the cycle by taking over 
Smith's Theatre in Yuba City, where he 
has been doing pretty well in spite of 
tough opposition. He tells us he might 
submit a pretty good show-selling idea to 
this department some time, and, then 
again he might not. So that's the way 
the matter stands at present. At any rate, 
we're mighty glad to have Ed with us 
and will let nature take its course. 

V 

CHESTER W. McLEAN 

informs us that he awoke on a December 
morning in the year 1932 and found him- 
self a manager and, therefore, eligible for 
one of the framed certificates of Round 
Table membership which grace the offices 
of several thousand showmen the world 
over. Prior to his appointment Chef served 
three years as assistant manager of the 
Publlx-Paramount Theatre in Providence, 
R. I., and his promotion places him at the 
helm of the Imperial Theatre, Pawtucket, 
R. I. Congratulations, Round Tabler, and 
now let's see what you can do to help the 
good work along. 

V 

J. LAVENDER 

holds down the job of advertising director 
of the Plaza and Lyric Theatres, respec- 
tively located in Fayetteville and Oak Hill, 
W. Va., and, in adaition, acts as assistant 
manager of the Plaza. He's another new 
Round Tabler In line for introduction to 
his many fellow members and we're glad 
of the opportunity to present his name. 
La Vender should be in an excellent position 
to furnish this department with Information 
it constantly seeks and we'll be on watch 
for his contributions. Let the gang know 
what's keeping you busy, J. L., and we'll 
pass the word along. 

V 

JACK ALGER 

not only manages the Valley Theatre, 
Spring Valley, III., but has charge of art 
work for other Alger houses on the circuit. 
We are taking this opportunity to acknowl- 
edge his application for membership and 
hope he, too, will do his full share toward 
sending in material to help keep this de- 
partment the livest and most up-to-date 
of its kind In the world. In adidtion to 
word of what he's doing In the way of 
house management we'd like to see some 
samples of his art work, so shoot some 
dope along, Jack, at the first chance that 
presents itself. 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



59 




THE I^ELEASE CHART 



Productions are listed according to the names of distributors in order that the exhibitor may have a short-cut towards such infor- 
mation as he may need, as well as information on pictures that are coming. Features which are finished or are in work, but to 
which release dates have not been assigned, are listed in "Coming Attractions." Running times are those supplied by the 
distributors. Where they vary, the change is probably due to local censorship deletions. Dates are 1^32, unless otherwise specified 



ALLIED PICTURES 



FIRST NATIONAL 



Features 



Title Star 

A Man's Land Hoot Gibson-Marion Shilling.. .Juno 

Boiling Point, The Hoot Gibson-Helen Foster July 

Cowboy Counsellor Hoot Gibson-Sheila Manners. .. .Oct. 

Intruder, The Monte Biue-Llla Lee Dec. 

Iron Master, The Liia Lee-Reginald Denny Nov. 

Oflcer 13 Monte Biue-Llla Lee Nov, 

Parisian Remanee, A Lew Cody-Marion Shilling Oct. 

Stoker, The Monte Blue-Dorothy Burgess. . .June 

Unhely L«ve H. B. Warner- Li la Lee June 



Coming Feature Attractions 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

. . 65 J une 11 

..70.... July 23 
..63 Oct. 8 



15... 
15... 
26... 

I... 
26... 

I... 
15... 

I... 



...69 Dec. 

. . .67 Dec. 

...77.... Sent. 

. . .70 June 

...78.... July 



10 
3 
17 
25 
9 



A Shriek In th« Night 

Anu Karenlaa 

Beyend the Law 

Davy Jones' Letker , 

Eleventh Cemmandmtnt 

Midnight Alarm 

Nestors. The Monte Blue 

Pullman Car 

Red Kisses 

Slightly Used 

Three Castles 

Valley of Adventure, The Monte Blue 

Without Children 



ARTCLASS PICTURES 



Features 

Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Night Rider. The Harry Carey June 72 

They Never Come Back Regis Toomey- Dorothy Sebastian. May 63 June II 



COLUMBIA 

Features 

Title Star Rel. 

American Madnoss Walter Huston-C. Cummlngs- 

K. Johnson Aug. 

Bitter Tea tf Oeaaral YM....B. Stanwyck-Nils Aether Jan. 

By Whose Hand? Ben Lyon-Barbara Weeks July 

DMCDtioD Leo Carrillo- Barbara Weeks- 
Nat Pendleton Nov. 

Forbidden Trail Buck Jones-Barbara Weeks Nov. 

Hello Treuble Buck Jones-Llna Basauette. . . .. July 

Last Man. The Chas. Bickford-C. Cummings. . .Aug. 

Man Against Woman Jack Holt-Lillian Miles Nov. 

McKenna of the Mounted Buck Jones-Greta Granstedt. . . . Aug. 

Night Club Lady, The Adorohe Meniou-Mayo Methot- 

Skeets Gallagher Aug. 

Night Mayor, The Lee Tracy-Evaiyn Knapp Aug. 

No More Orchids Carole Lombard-Lyie Talbot. ... Nov. 

Speed Demon Wm. Collier. Jr.-Joan Marsh. ..Nov. 

Sporting Age, This Jack Holt-Evaiyn Knapp Sent. 

That's My Boy R. Cromwell-Dorothy Jordan- 
Mae Marsh Oct. 

Two Fisted Law Tim McCoy-Alice Day June 

Vanity Sb'oet C. Bickford-Helen Chandler Oct 

Virtue Carole Lombard- Pat O'Brien. , .Oct. 

War Correspondent Jack Holt- Ralph Graves-Llia 

Lee July 

Washington Merry Ge Round.. Lee Traey-C. Cummings Oct. 

Western Cede, The Tim McCoy-Nora Lane Sept. 

White Eagle Buck Jones-Barbara Weeks Oct. 

Coming Feature Attractions 

Air Hostess Evalyn Knapp-Jaraes Murray- 

Thelma Todd Jan. I5,'33. 

As the Devil Commands Alan Dlnehart-Neii Hamilton- 
Mae Clarke 

Brand Inspector, Th« Tim McCoy-Florence Britton 

Brief Moment Barbara Stanwyck 

California Trail, The Buck Jones-Helen Mack 

Child of Manhattan John Boles-Nancy Carroll 

Cornered Tim McCoy 

Destroyer, The 

End of the Trail, The Tim McCoy-Luana Walters 

Fighting for Justice Tim McCoy-Joyce Compton 

Forgotten Man. The Jack Holt 

Hurricane D«ek Jack Holt 

Man of Action Tim McCoy-Caryl Lincoln Jan. 20.'33. 

Mir 



Running Time 
Date Minutes Reviewed 

15 78....July » 

6.'33 80.... Nov. 26 

6 64 



4. 
18. 

15. 
31. 
15. 
26. 

27. 
19. 
25. 
5. 
15. 

6. 

8. 
15. 

25. 

25. 
15. 
16. 
7. 



.67 

.71 Sept. 24 

.68 Dec. 10 

.66 

.68 Sept. 3 

..68 Dec. 3 

..74 Nov. 19 

,.65.... Nov. 26 

..67. ...Oct. 15 

..71.... Dec. 3 

..57 

.67. ...Oct. 29 
..69.... Nov. 5 

,.77 Aug. 20 

..78... Oct. 1 



..67. 



.Oct. 



«lke 



Obey the Law Leo Carrillo-Lols Wilson-Dickie 

Moore 

Parole Girl 

Pearls and Emeralds 

Rule« for Wlv»« 

So This Is Africa Bert Wheeler- Robt. Woolsey- 

Raquel Torres 

State Trooper Regis Toomey- Evalyn Knapp... 

Sundown Rider. The.. Buck Jones-Barbara Weeks 

TrMHR Buck Jones-Shirley Grey 

Wild Stallion Wm. Janney- Dorothy Appleby.. 



FIRST DIVISION 

Features 



Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Condemed to Death Arthur Wontner Sept. 15 70 July 23 

Goona Gsona Nov. 25 65 Aug. 27 

Monte Carlo Madness Sari Maritza Sept. 15 64 June 11 

Ringer, The Frankiyn Dyall Sept. 15 60 June II 



Features 

Title Star Rel. Date 

Cabin in the Cotton Richard Bartheimess Oct. 15. 

Central Park Joan Biondeii Dec. ID. 

Crash, The Ruth Chatterton Oct. 8. 

Crooner David Manners Aug. 20. 

Dr. X ...Lionel Atwili-Fay Wray Aug. 27. 

Life Begins Loretta Young-Eric Linden. .. .Oct. I. 

Love Is a Racket Douglas Fairbanks, Jr June 25. 

Match King. The Warren Wiiiiam-Lili Damita. . . Dec. 31. 

Silver Dollar Edward G. Robinson Dec. 24. 

Tenderfoot, The Joe E. Brown June 18. 

They Call It Sin Loretta Young-Geo. Brent Nov. 5. 

Three on a Match Biondeil-Wiillam-Dvorak-Davis. .Oct. 29. 

Tiger Shark Edward G. Robinson Sept. 24. 

Two Seconds Edward G. Robinson June 4. 

Week-End Marriage Loretta Young-Norman Foster. . .July 9. 

You Said a Mouthful Joe E. Brown Nov. 26. 



Running Time 

Minutes Reviewed 

78.... Sept. 10 

55.... Nov. 19 

58....S0Pt 17 

68 Aug. 6 

77.... Juno II 

72.... Aug. 13 

72 June 18 

79.... Dec. 17 

78. ...Nov. 5 

70.... May 28 

74 Sept. 3 

Get I 

..80 Aug. 27 

..68.. ..May 2S 

..66....June II 

..72.... Nov. 19 



Coming Feature Attractions 

Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Blondle Johnson Joan Biondeli-Chestor Morris. .. Feb. 25,'33 

Central Airport Richard Bartheimess 

Elmer the Great Joe E. Brown 

Employees Entrance W. Wiillam-Loretta Young Feb. Ii,'33 78 Dec. 24 

Ex-Lady Bette Davis-Gene Raymond 

Frisco Jenny Ruth Chatterton Jan. I4,'33 76 Dec. 17 

Mind Reader, The Warren Wililam-C. Cummings 

She Had to Say Yes Loretta Young-Lyle Talbot 

20.000 Years in Sing Sing... Bette Davls-Spencer Tracy Feb. I, '33 Nov. i 



FOX FILMS 



18.... 

7.... 

4.... 
31.... 



30.... 
25.... 
25.... 
4... 



21 

14 



Features 

Title Star Rel. 

Almost Married Violet Homing-Ralph Bellamy- 
Alexander Kirkland July 

Call Her Savage Bow-Owsiey-Todd-Roland Nov. 

Chandu, The Magician Edmund Lowo-Beia Lugosl- 

..Irene Ware Sept. 

Congorilla Mr. & Mrs. Martin Johnson. ..Aug. 

Down to Earth Will Rogers- Irene Rich Sept. 

First Year. The Gaynor-Farreil July 

Golden West, The Geo. O'Brien-Janet Chandler- 
Marion Burns Oct. 

Handle With Care Jas. Dunn-Boots Mallory Dec. 

Hat Check Girl Sally Eiiers-Ben Lyon Seat. 

Me and My Gal Joan Bennett-Spencer Tracy... Dee. 

Painted Woman, The P. Shannon-Spencer Tracy-Wm. 

Boyd Aug. 

Passport to Hell, A Elissa Landi-Paul Lukas-A 

Kirkland- Warner Oland Aug. 

Rackety Rax Victor McLaglen-Greta NISMn- 

Nelt O'Day Oct. 

Rebecca of Sunnvbrook Farm.. Marian Nixon-R. Bellamy July 

Robbers Roost George O'Brien- Maureen 

O'Sulllvan Jan. 

Second Hand Wife Sally Ellers-Raiph Bellamy Jan. 

Sherlock Holmes Olive Brook-Miriam Jordan Nov. 

Six Hours to Live Warner Baxter-John Boies-Mir- 
iam Jordan Oct. 

Tess of the Storm Country. .. Janet Gaynor-Chas. Farrell Nov. 

Too Busy To Work Will Rogers-Marian Nixon. ...Nov. 

Wild Girl Joan Bennett-Charles Farrell- 

Ratph Bellamy Oct. 

Coming Feature Attractions 

Bad Boy James Dunn-Sally Eiiers 

Broadway Bad Joan Biondeii • Ginger Rogers 

RIcardo Cortez Feb. i2,'33. 

Cavalcade Clive Brook-Diana Wynyard 

Dangerously Yours Miriam Jordan-Warner Baxter.. .Jan. 29,'33. 

Face In the Sky Spencer Tracy-Marian Nixon- 
Stuart Erwin Jan. 

Hot Pepper Victor McLaglen-Edmund Lowe- 

Luoe Velez-EI Brendel Jan. 22,'33. 

Infernal Machine. The Genevieve Tobln-Chester Morris- 
Alexander Kirkland Feb. 5,'33.. 

Man-Eater Marion Burns-Kane Richmond 

Paddy. The Next Best Thing.. Janet Gaynor 

Road to Heaven Boots Mallory-A. Kirkland 

Smoke Lightning George O'Brien-Nell O'Day Feb. I9,'33.. 

State Fair Janet Gaynor-WIii Rogers-Lew 

Ayres-Saliy Eilers-Norman 

Foster- Frank Craven 

Walking Down Broadway James Dunn-Boots Mallory- 

Zasu Pitts-Minna Gombell 

Zoo In Budapest Gene Raymond-Loretta Young.. 



Running Time 
Date Minutes Reviewed 



17 51 

27 88. 



...74. 
.. ..72. 
.. ..73. 
.. ..80. 



. .74. 
.75.. 
..64.. 
....78.. 



.72.. 
.75.. 



23 75. 

3 80. . 

8.'33 

I. '33 

6 69., 

16 80. 

20 75, 

13 70. 

9 74.. 



..Dee. 3 

..Sept. 17 

..July l( 

..July 23 

..July 2S 

..Oct. IS 

. . Dec 24 

..Sept. 24 

.Dec. 17 

..Aug. 13 

..Sept. 3 

..Oct. 29 

..July 16 



. Nov. 2( 

.Oct. 29 

. Nov. 26 

Nov. 12 

Oct. 8 



i5.'33. 



FREULER FILM ASSOCIATES 

Features 



Title 

Fighting Gentleman. 



Running Time 

Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

The Wm. Collier, Jr.-Joseohino 

Dunn-N.Moorhead Oct. 7 65 Oct. 15 

Fortv-NIners. The Tom Tyler Oct. 28 59 

Gambling Sex Ruth Hall-Grant Withers Nov. 21 65 

Penal Code, The Regis Toomey-Helen Cohan Dec. 23 

Savage Girl, The Rochelie Hudson-Walter Byron. . Dec. 5 



Coming Feature Attractions 



Black Cat. The 

East of Sudan 

Green Paradise 

Kiss of Araby Jan. 3I,'33. 

My Wandering Boy 

Red Man's Country 

Silent Army, The 

Sisters of the Follies 

When a Man Rides Alone Tom Tyler Jan. I4,'33. 



60 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



(THE RELEASE CH ACT— CONT'D ) 



MAJESTIC 

Features 

Running Time 

TItIa Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Crusader. The .Evelyn Brent-H. B. Warner Oct. 1 72 Oct. 8 

Geld Jack Hoxie-Allce Day Sept. 15 S3 

Hearts sf Humanity Jean Hersholt-Jaelile Searl Sept. 1 70 Sept. 24 

Law and Lawless JaeK Hoxie-Hllda Mereno Ncv. 30 

Outlaw Justice Jack Hoxle-Dorothy Gulliver Oct. 1 61 

Phantom Express. The... .....Sally Blane-Wm. Collier, Jr Sept IS 70 Sept. 24 

Unwritten Law. The Greta NIssen-Skeets Qallaihsr.. .Nov. 15 

Vampire Bat. The Lionel Atwill-Fay Wray Dee. IS 

Via Pony Exprei* Jack Hoxle-Marcellne Day Dec. IS 



Coming Feature Attractions 



Comeback, The Benny Rubin 

Public Be Damned. The..... 

Sins. You Sinner Jan. 15, '33. 

Woman In the Chair. The Feb. I5,'33. 



MAYFAIR PICTURES 



.64 Oct. 29 

..67 Oct. 29 



Features 

Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Alias Mary Smith .......... Gwen Lee-Jolin Darrow July 15 

Behind Jury Doors .Helen Chandler-Wm. Collier, Jr.. .Dec. 1 67 

Gorilla Ship, The. Ralph Ince-Vera Reynolds June II 66 Aug. 27 

Heart Punch Marion Shilling-L. Hughes Oct. 

Her Mad Night ..Irene Rich-Conway Tearls ......Oct. 

Malay Nights John Mack Brown-D. Burgess- 

Ralsh I no Nov. 

Midnight Morals Beryl IHercer^has. Delansy- 

Gwen Lee Aug. I. 

Midnight Warning ...William Boyd'ClaudIa Dell Nev. 15. 

No Living Witness Barbara Kent-Gilbert Roland.. .Sept. IS 65 Sept. 17 

Sister to Judas Claire Windsor-John Harron. . . . Jan. I, '33 

Tangled Destinies Lloyd WhItlock-Dorls Hill. .....Sent I 

Temptation's Workshop ......Helen Foster-Tyrell Davis June 20 

Trapped In TIa Juana .......Edwins Bosth-Duncan Renaldo. . Aug. IS 

Widow In Scarlet D. Revler- Kenneth Harlan July 1 58 July 23 



15... 

I 



I. 



61.. ..Aug. 13 



27. 

6. 
IS. 
16. 



9., 



5. 
4. 
4. 
17. 

8. 
18. 



METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

Title Star Rel. Date 

BIsndie of the Follies Marion Davles-R. Montgomery ...Aug. 20 

Divorce In the Family Jackie Cooper Aug. 

(Reviewed under the title "After Divorce") 

Downstairs John Gilbert Aug. 

Faithless T. Bankhead-R. Montgomery Oct. 

Fast Life William Halnes-Madge Evans.. .Dec. 

Flesh Wallace Beery-Karen Morley- 

Rlcardo Cortez Dec. 

Grand Hotel Garbo-John Barrymore Sept. II 

Kongo ....Walter Huston-Lupe Veiez Oct. I 

Mask of Fu Manchu, The... Boris Karloff Nev. 

New Morals for Old Robert Young-M. Perry June 

Night Court ....W. Huston-P. Holmes-A. Page.. June 

Pack Up Your Troubles Laurel &. Hardy Salt. 

Payment Deferred M. 0'8ulilvan-C. Laughton Oct. 

Prosperity Dressier- Moran ....Nov. 

Rasputin and the Empreu..... Ethel. John and Lionel Barry- 
more Dec. 23. 

Red Dust Clark Gable-Jean Harlow Oct. 22. 

Red Headed Woman Jean Harlow-Chester Morris June 2S 

Skyscraper Souls ....W. Willlam-M. O'Sullivan July IB 

Smilln' Thru .Norma Shearer- Fredric March- 
Leslie Howard Sept. 24 

Son Daughter ....Helen Hayes-Ramon Novarre Dee. 23. 

Speak Easily ..Buster Keaton ..Aug. 13 

Strange Interlude ....Norma Shearer-Clarke Gable Dee. 30 

Unashamed Helen Twelvetrees July 2. 

Washington Masguerade Lionel Barrymore July 9. 

(Reviewed under the title "Washington Show") 

Coming Feature Attractions 

Buddies ...Buster Keaton-JImmy Durante 

China Seas Clark Gable 

Clear All Wires Lee Tracy-Benita Hume 

Happily Unmarried 

La Tendresse Norma Shearer 

Lady, The Irene Dunne-Phllllps Holmes , 

Lost Joan Crawford 

Man of the Nile Ramon Novarre 

Men Must Fight Phillips Holmes-Ruth Selwyn 

Pes 0' My Heart ...Marlon Davles 

Pig Boats Robt. Montgomery-Jimmy Du- 
rante- Robt. Young -Walter 
Huston-Madge Evans 

Reunion In Vienna John and Lionel Barrymore 

Tarzan and His Mats .1. Welssmuiler-M. O'Sullivan 

Tugboat Annie Marie Dressier- Wallace Beery 

Turn To the Right 

Whistling in the Dark Ernest Truex-Una Merkel 

White Sister, The Helen Hayes-Clark Gable 



Running Time 

Minutes Reviewed 

..90 Sept. 10 

..78 Aug. 20 

..72 Aug. 6 

..74 Oct 15 

..75 Dec. 10 



..75. 
.115. 
..86. 
..67. 
..76. 
..95. 
..64. 
..76.. 
..76. 

.127. 
..73. 
..7S.. 
..80. 



.Dec. 17 

.Apr. 16 

. Nov. 26 

.Dec. 10 

.July 2 

.June 4 

July 9 

.Sept. 24 

.Nov. 12 

.Dec. 31 

.Oct. 22 

.June 25 

.July 16 



.IOO....OeL 22 



..82.... Aug. 27 

.112.... Sept. 3 

..77... July 23 

..74.... July 2 



MONOGRAM PICTURES CORPORATION 



Features 

Title Star 

Grashln' Broadway Rex Bell 

Diamond Trail. The Rex Bell 



From Broadway te CheytBM. 



Hidden Valley .....Bob Steele 



Klondike Thelma Todd-Frank Hawks. 



...68 Dec. 10 



Man from Arizona. The Rex Bell 

Self- Defense Pauline Frederick 

Strange Adventure .Regis Toomey-June Clyde No*. 20 7 reels. 

.Aug. 

. jd. The Estelle Taylor Aug. S 

Young Blood 



Rel. Date 










.Dee. 








. Sent. 




Nev. 


IS 










.Aug. 


SO. 






,Oet. 


21 




IS 




20 


.Sept. 


3 


.Aug. 


S 


Nov. 


5 



Running Time 

Minutes Reviewed 



. 6 reels 

.60 

.68 Sept. 24 



13 



Coming Feature Attractions 



Black Beauty Jan. I5.'33. 

Jungle Bride Anita Page-Charles Starrett Jan. I0.'33. 

Oliver Twist 

West of Slngapere Betty Compson-CIyde Cook Jan. 3I,'33. 



28... 

6,'33 

16.. 

12.. 

9.. 
II.. 

6,'33, 

5.. 

4.. 
30.. 
19.. 
28.. 



15. 



26. 
30. 
22. 

7. 

I. 

8. 
23. 
14. 

23. 



21. 
2. 



29. 
25. 



PARAMOUNT PUBLIX 

Features 

Title Star Rel. 

Aren't We All? Gertrude Lawrence July 

Big Broadcast. Thl Stuart Erwin-BIng Crosby-Kate 

Smith - Leila Hyam • Mills 
Bros. - Bosweli Sisters - Cab 
Calloway • Vincent Lopez • 
Arthur Tracy - Sharon Lynn Oct. 

Billion Dollar Scandal Carole Lombard- Robt. Armstrong. .Jan. 

Blonde Venus Marlene Dietrich Sent. 

Devil and the Deep T. Bankhead-G. Cooper Aug. 

Devil Is Driving, The... Edmund Loew-Wynne Gibson Dee. 

Evenings for Sals Herb Marshall-Sari Marltza Nov. 

Farewell to Arms, A Helen Hayes-Gary Cooper Jan. 

Guilty as Hell Edmund Lowe-Victor McLaglen. . Aug. 

He Learned About Women Stuart Erwin-A. Skipworth Nov. 

Heritage of the Desert Randolph Scott-S. Fleming Sept. 

Horse Feathers Four Marx Bros Aug. 

Hot Saturday Nancy Carroil-Cary Grant Oct 

If I Had a Million Gary Cooper - Wynne Gibson- 

Geo. Raft- Richard Bennett- 
Mary Robson Nov. 

Island of Lost Souls Chas. Laughton- Richard Arlen- 

Irving PIchel-Lelia Hyams Dee. 

Lady and Gent... Geo. Bancroft- Wynne Gibson. .. .July 

Lily Christine Corinne Grifflth-Colin Cllvt July 

Love Me Tonight Maurice Chevalier-Jeanette 

MacDonald Aug. 

Madame Butterfly Sylvia SIdney-Cary Grant Dec, 

Madame Racketeer Alison Skipworth-R. Bennett July 

Madison Sauare Garden Jaclc Oakie-Marian Nixon Oct. 

Make Me a Star Joan Blondell-Stuart Erwin July 

Million Dollar Legs Jack Oakie July 

Movie Crazy Harold Lloyd-C. Cummings Sent. 

Night After Night Geo. Raft-C. Cummings Oct. 

Night of June 13 Clive Brook-Frances Dee-Gene 

Raymond Sent. 

No Man of Her Own Clark Gable-Carole Lombard Dee. 

Phantom President, The Geo. M. Cohan-Claudete Col- 
bert-Jimmy Durante Oct. 

70.000 Witnesses .....Phil Holmes-Dorothy Jordan Sept. 

Sign of the Cross Fredrlo March-Ellssa Landl- 

■ Claudette Colbert 

Trouble In Paradise Miriam Hopkins-H. Marshall- 
Kay Francis Oct. 

Under Cover Man... Geo. Raft-Nancy Carroll Dec. 

Vanishing Frontier John Mack Brown- Evaiya 

Knapp-Zasu Pitts July 

Wild Horse Mesa .Randolph Scott-Sally Blane Nov. 

Coming Feature Attractions 

A Bedtime Story.... Maurice Chevalier-Carole Lom- 
bard 

Crime of the Century, The Stuart Erwin-Wynne Gibson Feb. 10, '33.. 

Curse of Sunken Gold 

Eagle and the Hawk, The Gary Cooper-Oakle-Raft 

From Hell to Heaven Carole Lombard- Richard Arlen 

Good Company Alison Sklpworth-Roland Young.. Feb. 24,'33. 

Hello, Everybody Kate Smith ^ 

King of the Jungle Frances Dee-ffuster Crabbe Jan 

Lives of a Bengal Lancer, The. Fredric March-Gary Cooper- 
Richard Arlen 

Luxury Liner George Brent-Sari Maritza-ZIta 

Johann-lrvlna PIchel Feb. 3,'33.. 

Murders in the Zoo Charlie Ruggles 

Mysterious Rider, The Kent Taylor-Lona Andr* Jan. 20,'33., 

Pick Up Sylvia Sidney-George Raft 

She Done Him Wrong Mae West-Owen Moore Jan. 27,'33.. 

Story of Temple Drake, The.. Miriam Hopkins-George Raft 

Strictly Personal Marjorie Rambeau- Eddie Quil- 

lan-D. Jordan 

Tonight Is Ours C. Colbert- Fredric March-Paul 

Cavanagh Jan. I3,'33.. 

Under the Tonto Rim.. Kent Taylor 

Woman Accused, The Gary Grant-Nancy Carroll-John 

Halllday-Rlchard Bennett ... Feb. I7,'33. 



Running Time 
Date Minutes Reviewed 
68.... July t 



..80. 
, .78.. 

.85.. 

.70.. 

.70.. 

.65.. 
..78.. 

.80., 



.Oct. • 

.Dec. 31 

.Sent. 10 

.Aug. 6 

.Dec. 10 

.Nov. 8 

.Dee. I* 

.July 36 



.59. 
.68. 
.73. 



..95. 

..70. 
..80. 
..59. 



.Aug. 8 
.Oct. 22 



.Nov. 12 



.Deo. 
.July 



10 
9 



.104. 
..86. 
..72. 
..74. 
..(8. 
..64. 
..96. 
..70., 

..72. 
..76. 

..78. 
..72. 

.123. 

..73. 
..74. 

..70. 



.Aug. 26 

.Dee. 31 

.July SO 

.Oet. 8 

.Juno M 

.July 2 

.Sept. 24 

.Oct. 8 

.Sent 17 

. Dec. 24 

.Sent 24 

.Aug. 20 

.Dee. 10 



.Oct. 
.Dee. 



29 
10 



.July 23 



POWERS PICTURES 



Features 



star 



Title 

Gables Mystery, The Lester Matthews-Anne Gray June 

Her Radio Romeo Gene Gerrard-Jessle Matthews.. .July 

Her Strange Desire Laurence Olivier July 

Limping Man, The Franklin Dyali Aug. 

Lucky Girl Gene Gerrard-Molly Lament Sept. 

Man Who Won, The Henry Kendall-Heather Angel — Sent. 

Skin Game Edmund Gwenn - Phyllis Kon- 

stam June 

Woman Decides, The Adrlanne Allen-Owen Nares Aug. 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 
15 71. ...May 7 



1... 


....60.. 


..Aug. 


13 


1... 


....55.. 


. .Aug. 


27 


1... 


....69.. 






15 


70.. 






• 70 











RKO RADIO PICTURES 



Features 



Title 
Age of Consent, 



Running Tin 
Rel. Date Minutes 



Star 

The Richard Cromwell- Eric Linden 

Arllne Judge Aug. 5 80. 

Animal Kingdom Leslie Howard-Ann Harding Dec. 23 78. 

BUI of Divorcement John Barrymore-Billle Burke. ...Sent. 30 76... 

Bird of Paradise D. Del Rio-Joel McCrea Aug. 12 80... 

Bring 'Em Back Allva Frank Buck's Adventure Aug. 19 70... 

Come on Danger Tom Keene Sent. 23 

Oonquerors, The Ann Hardlng-Rlehard Dlx Nov. 18 80... 

Half-Naked Truth, The Lee Tracy-Luna Velez Dee. 16 

Hell's Highway Richard Dlx Sept 23 80... 

Hold 'Em Jail Edna May Oliver - Wheeler - 

Woolsey-Roscoe Ates Sept. 2 74... 

Is My Face RedT Helen Twelvetrees- RIeardo Cor- 

tez-Robt. Armstrong June 17 66... 

Little Orphan Anala MItzl Green-Buster Phelps Nov. 4 70... 

Men Are Such Fools Lee Carrllio-V. Osbsraa Nev. 18 

Men of America Bill Boyd Doe. 9 75... 

Monkey's Paw. The Ivan SImpson-Laulsa Carter Jan. I3.'33 52... 

Most Dangerous Game, Tha....Leslle Banks-Joel McCrea Sent. 9 78... 

Penguin Pool Murdar Edna May Oliver „...Dec. 30 75... 

Phantom of Crestwead Rlcarde Cortez-Karen Morley Oct. 14 77... 

Renegades of the Wast ..Tom Keene Nov. 25 75... 

Roar of the Dragei Richard Dlx-Gwlll Andre July 8 76... 

Rockabye Constance Bennett-Joel McCrea.. .Nov. 25 75... 

Secrets of the French Police. . Gwlll Andre-Frank Margan Dee. 2 58... 

Snort Parade. The Joel McCrea-Marian Marsh Nov. II 65... 

Strange Justice Marian Marsh-R. Denny Oct. 7 74... 

Thirteen Women Irene Dunne-Gregory Ratoff Sept. 16 73... 



Reviewed 

.July 30 

.Daa. 10 

.Sept 10 

.June 2S 

.June 4 



.Nov. 19 



.Aug. 20 
.June 25 



.June II 
Oet 20 



Nov. 12 



Oct. 



I 



July 30 
Nov. 12 



Oct 
.Nov. 
July 



22 
26 
9 



Nov. 26 

, Dec. 17 

.Dee. 24 

Aug. 27 

Sent. 8 



Coming Feature Attractions 

Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Cheyenne Kid Tom Keene Jan. 20,'33 

Goldie Gets Along Lill Damita-Chas. Morton Jan. 27.'33 

Great Jasper, The Richard Dix-Julle Hayden Feb. 17,'33 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



61 



( THE RELEASE CHACT—CCNT'D ) 



Running Tin* 
R(l. Date Minutes Reviewed 



3.'33 60 Dec. 31 



TItl* Star 

Hall Bent tor Elaetlan Edna May Oliver 

KInQ Kang Fay Wray-Bruee Cabat 

LIttIa Wemen Anita Louise- Dorathy Wllaan 

Lucky Devils SMI Boyd-Bruce Cabot-Wllllam 

Gargan-D. Wilson-R. Hudssn..Feb. 

No Other Woman Irene Dunne-Chas. Bickford , 

9ur Betters Constance Bennett-Joel McCrea..Mar. 31, '33 

Pait af Mary Holmes, The... .Helen MacKellar-Erle Linden Jan. 20,'33 , 

Sallar Be Goad Jack Oakle-Vlvlenne Osberna 

Starlet River Tom Keene-D. Wilson Mar. I7,'33 

Sun Alio Rises. The • . ., 

Sweepings Lionel Barrymere Mar. 24,'33 _ 

Theft ef the Mana Lisa. Tha.. Willy Forst-Trude von Molo 92 Anr, 

(Reviewed — German version) 
Tonaze John Barrymore-Myrna Loy Mar. 3,'33 



IS.... 
t... 



.74... 

..78... 

..86.. 
..58... 
..80.. 
.100... 



.Nov. 
.Dae. 



5 
18 



.Oct. I 

.July 9 

.Oct. 29 

.June 18 



66.... Oct. 22 



STATE RIGHTS 

Features 

Running Time 

Title Star Dist'r Rei. Date Minutes Reviewed 

A Naus La LIberta Roila France Harold Auten 93 June 25 

8al. La Andre Lefaur Protex Trading 80 Oct. 8 

Barberina, Tha King's 

Dancer Lil Dagover Capital Oct 25 87 Nov. 12 

Beautiful Maneuver Time. Ida Wuest World's Trade 

Blame tha Woman Adolphe Menlou- 

Benlta Huiia ....Principal Oet. 

Comradeship Assoc. Cinemas Nov. 

Cruiser Emden World's Trade 

Exchange .... Sept 

Dangers af the Arctic Exd. Film Co 

David Oolder Harry Baur Protex Trading 

Diary af a Revolutionist. .G. V. Mouzaievsky. . Amkino June 

Face on the Barroom Floor, 

Tha B. Fletcher Invincible 

Fire In the Opera G. Froelich - J. 

Nowatna Capital July 12 92.. 

Flower Lady of LIndonau. Renate Mueller ....Protex Trad I m. . July 7 70.. 

Forbidden Company Sally Blana Chesterfield ....Juno 1 67.. 

GItta Discovers Her Heart. GItta Aipar Capital 91.. 

dloria Gustav Froehiich ...Tobis Ott. 27 (7.. 

Herzblut Renate Mueller . . . . Cines-Pittaluga.. SopL SO 77.. 

House of Death N. P. ChmeilofT Amkino Aug. 12 76.. 

I Kiss Your Hand, Madama.Mariene Dietrich ...Stanley Aug. 27 60.. 

Immortal Vagabond. The.. Gustav Froelich Ufa 88.. 

<n the Days of the Crusaders.Alberto Pasauall Menopole Oct, 1 75.. 

Isle ef Paradise Invincible 

Louise, Queen of Prussia... Henny Porten Assoc. Cinemas. . Oct. 4 92.. 

Love Is Love Kathe von Nagy Ufa 

Maedchen In Uniform Hertha Thieie John Krlmsky- 

Gifford Cochran 110.. 

Manhattan Tower Mary Brian-Irene 

Rich-James Hall. . Ramington Dae. 1 67.. 

Man Without a Namo, Tha. Werner Krauss Protex Trading. Nov. 5 90... 

Midnight Lady. The John Darrow Chesterfield 65.. 

1914 Capital «ept 3 73.. 

Out of Singapore Noah Beery Goldsmith Pies 61.. 

Party Does Not Answer, The.Dorothy Wieck Capital Nov. 29 76... 

Pride of the Legion Sally Blane-B. Kent. Mascot Oct. 10 70.. 

Red Haired Alibi Merna Kennedy Capital Oet. 21 75.. 

Schubert's Dream ef Sprlng.Alfred Laeutner Capital 75.. 

Silver Linins. The Maureen O'Sulllvan. . Patrician Pic- 
tures 58.. 

Slightly Married Evaiyn Knapp-Walter 

Byron Chesterfield ....Oct. 15 65 Dee. 3 

Sniper. The Amkino Aug. 25 68 Sept. 3 

Speed Madness Richard Talmadge- 

Nancy Drexel Mercury 62 

Thrill of Youth June Clyde Chesterfleld ....Aug. 15 63. 

Two Hearts That Beat 

as One Lilian Harvey Ufa-Protex Sept 8. 

Virgins of Ball Principal Dec. 8. 

With Williamson Beneath 

the Sea Principal Nov. 24. 

Woman In Chains Owen Nares invincible 

(Reviewed under title "The Impassive Footman" — Assoc. Radia British) 
Yorck Werner Krauss Protex Trading Nov. 2S 99 Doo. It 



.Aug. 6 

.Aug. 6 

.July 9 

..Oet. IS 

.Nov. 12 

.Oct 15 

.Aug. 27 

.Sent. 10 

.June 4 

.Oct. 15 

.July 16 

.Oct 15 

.Juno 11 

.Oct I 

.Nov. 19 

.Dee. 17 

.June II 

kSopt 24 

.Sent 24 
Dec. 31 

..Oct 29 

..Oct 29 

.July 2 

.June 4 



. ..80... 
. ..46.. 



.59. 
.69. 



.July 30 
.Sent. 10 



.Sept 24 
.Dec. 17 



.Dec. 
.Aug. 



3 
13 



TIFFANY 

Features 



Title 

last Mile. The 

Man Called Back. Tho 
Those We Love 



Running Time 

Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Preston Foster - Howard 

Phillips Aug. 21 84.... July 30 

Conrad Nagei-Doris Kenyon July 17 80.... July 23 

Liiyan Tashman- Kenneth 

MacKenna ..Sent II 77. ...Sept. 17 



UNITED ARTISTS 



Running Tl 

Star Rel. Date Minutes 
.Lilian Harvey 83.. 



Features 

TltU 

Congress Daneei _ 

Cynara Ronald Colman-Kay Francis Deo. 

Kid from Spain. Tha Eddie Canter Nov. 

Magic Night Jack Buchanan Nov. 

Mr. Robinson Crusoe Douglas Fairbanks _.Aug. 

Kain Joan Crawford Oct. 

yiMt* Zomblo Bela Lugosi Aug. 

Coming Feature Attractions 

Hallelujah. I'm ■ Bum Al Jolson 

I Cover tho Waterfront 

Jade (Made In Tibet and India) 

Joe Palooka Jimmy Durante 

Masauerader. The Ronald Coiman-Elissa Landi 

Perfect Understanding Gloria Swanson 

Secrets Mary PIckford-Leslie Howard , 



24.. 

17 

5 

19 

22 

4 



..80. 
..90.. 
..76.. 
..72.. 
..85. 
..70. 



me 

Reviewed 

..May 28 

:.Nav. 5 

. . Nov. 5 

..Nov. 12 

..Oct I 

..Sept 17 

..Aug. 6 



UNIVERSAL 

Features 



Title Star 
Afraid to Talk Erie Linden-Sidney Fox Nov. 

(Reviewed under title "Merry Go Round") 

Air Mall Pat O'Brien-Ralph Bellamy Nov. 

All Amerlcaa. The Richard Arlen-Gloria Sturt Oct 

Baek Straat Irene Dunne- John Boles Sept 

Doomed Battalion. Tha Tala BIreil-Vlctor VareonI June 

Fast ComMnlons Tom Brswn June 

naming 'Quns Tom Mix- Ruth Hall Dee. 

Fourth Horseman, The Tom Mix Sent 

Hidden Gold Tom Mix Nov. 

Igloo All Star July 

Mummy, Tho Boris Karloff-Zlta Johaan Dec. 

My Pal, Tho Klni Tom Mix Aug. 

Dkay America Lew Ayres-Maureen O'Sulll- 
van Sept. 



Running Tl 
Rel. Date Minutes 



17.... 

S.... 
IS.... 

I.... 
16.... 
23.... 

22. .. 
29.... 

3.... 
14.... 
22 

4.... 
8.... 



.78. 

. ..83.. 
...78.. 
. ..84.. 
. ..82 
...78 



me 

Reviewed 

..Sept 24 

..Oet 8 

..Sent 24 

.July 23 

..June 18 



..58. 
..78. 
..75. 



...July 16 
..Dec. 3 
...July 9 



Running Time 

Title star flol. Date MInutoa Rovlowo< 

Old Dark House, Tho Boris Karloff-L. Bond Oet 20 74 July 18 

Once In a Lifetime Jack Oakie-Sidney Fox Sent. 22 75. ...Aug. 17 

Texas Bad Man Tom Mix Juno 30 60 

They Just Had to Get Married.Summervillo-Pltta Jan. 5. '33 

Tom Brown of Culver Tom Brown July 21 70 July 16 



Coming Feature Attractions 



Big Cage. The Clyde Beatty 

Black Pearls Taia Bireii 

Counsellor-at-Law 

Destination Unknown Pat. O'Brien-Ralph Baliamy. . . .Jan. 26.'33. 

Laughing Boy Zita Johann 

Laughter In Hell Pat O'Brien-Gloria Stuart Jan. I2,'33.. 

Left Bank. Tho 

Nagana Taia Bireii-Meivyn Douglas Jan. t9.'33.. 

Prison Doctor, The 

Private Jones Lee Tracy-Gloria Stuart Feb. 9,'33. . 

Rebel, The Viima Banky-Luis Trenker 

Road Back. The 

Rome Express Esther Ralston-Conrad Veidt 

Rustler's Roundup Tom Mix-Diane Sinclair 

S. 0. S. Iceberg 

Salt Air Chas. Murray-Geo. Sidney 

Terror Trail. The Torn Mix Feb. 2,'33.. 



WARNER BROS. 

Features 



Title 



Star 



Bio City Bluet Joan Biondell Sopt 

Big Stampede. Tho John Wayne Oet. 

Blessed Event Lee Tracy-Mary Brian Sept 

Haunted Gold John Wayne Deo. 

I Am A Fugitive from a Chain 

Gang Paul Muni Nov. 

Jewel Robbery Wm. Powell-Kay Franolt Aug. 

Lawyer Man Wm. Powell-Joan Biondell Jan. 

One Way Passage Wm. Powell- Kay Franolt Oct. 

Ride Him Cowboy John Wayne-Ruth Hall Aug. 

Scarlet Dawn D. Fairbanks, Jr. - Naney 

Carroll Nov. 

Successful Calamity, A George Arliss Sept. 

Two Against the World Constance Bennett Sent. 

Winner Take All James Cagney July 



Running Tl 
Rel. Data Minutes 



18. 
8. 
10. 
17. 



...68. 



me 

Reviewed 
..Juno IS 



..84.... Sent !• 



11:::: 

7.'33. 
22.... 
27.... 



12... 
17... 
3... 
It... 



..•0.. 
..68.. 
..72.. 
..89.. 
..5t . 

..58.. 
..72.. 
..71 
..67. 



.Oct M 

.Juno II 

.Dec. 3 

.July SI 



...Nov. 12 

...Oet I 

...July 38 

...June 25 



Coming Feature Attractions 

Baby Face Barbara Stanwyck 

Blue Moon Murder Case, The.. Ben Lyon - Mary Brian - Peggy 

Shannon 

Forty-Second Street Warner Baxter-Bebo Daniels- 

Geo. Brent Feb. 25,'33 

Grand Slam Paul Lukas-Lorotta Young 

Hard to Handle James Cagney Jan. 28,'33 

Illegal Ivor Barnard 

Keyhole, The Kay Francis-George Brent 

Kino's Vacation, The George Arllts Feb. 25,'33 

Ladies They Talk About Barbara Stanwyck Feb. 4,'33 

Parachute Jumper Douglas Fairbanks, Jr Jan. 24.'33 

Picture Snatcher James Cagney Jan. 28, '33.. ..65 Dec. 31 

Somewhere in Sonera John Wayne 

Sucker D. Fairbanks, Jr.-Lorotta Young 

Telegraph Trail. The John Wayne 

Wax Museum Lionel Atwiil-Fay Wray Feb. i8,'33 



WORLD WIDE 



Features 

Running Time 

Title Star Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Bachelor's Folly Herbert Marshall-Edna Best June 12 69 July 2 

Between Fighting Men Ken Maynard Oct. 16 62 

Breach of Promise Chester Morris-Mae Clarke Oct 23 67 

Come On. Tarzan Ken Maynard Sept. II 61 

Crooked Circle, Tha Ben Lyon-lrene Purceli Sept. 25 70 

Death Kiss, The Adrienne Ames-David Manners- 
John Wray Jan. 

Dynamite Ranch Ken Maynard July 

False Faces Lowell Sherman- Llla Lee Oct. 

Fargo Express Ken Maynard Nov. 

Hypnotized Moran and Mack Dec. 

Man from Hell's Edges, Tho. .Bob Steele Juno 

Racetrack Leo Carrillo Juno 

Sign of Four, The Arthur Wontner Aug. 

Son of Oklahoma Bob Steele July 

Texas Buddies Bob Steele Aug. 28 

Tombstone Canyon Ken Maynard Dee. 25 



Trailing the Killer (Special) Deo 

Uptown New York Jack Oakla-Shlrloy Grey Doo, 

Coming Feature Attractions 

Auction in Souls Conrad Nagel-Leila Hyams 

Drum Tapt Ken Maynard Jan. 29,'33. 

Lone Avenger, The Ken Maynard Apr. 9,'33. 

Phantom Thunderbolt Ken Maynard Mar. 5,'33. 

Tarnished Youth Jetta Goudal-Glibert Roland 



8,'33 75 

31 .59 

i3:::::.v.83....Doo, 

20 82 

25 70. 

5 61. 

5 78 

14 74 

17 S5 

..59 
..62 



..Aug. 2C 
..Dec. 24 



.Dee. 24 
.Juno 4 



July 38 



4 68.... Oct 15 

4 80. ...Nov. It 



OTHER PRODUCT 



.78 Aug. 20 



Features 

Running Time 

Title Star DIsfr Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 
Baroud Rex Ingram Gaumont-Brltlsh 67 Oct. 15 

Diamond Cut Diamond Adolphe Menlou . . . M G M-Brltlsh 71 Sept. 10 

Faithful Heart, The Herbert Marshall- Gainsborough- 
Edna Best Gaumont May 28 

Fires of Fate Lester Matthews ...British Int'l 72 Oct 15 

Flag Lieutenant, The Henry Edwards-AnnaBritish and Do- 

Neagle mions 85. ...Dec. 

Flying Squad. The Harold Huth British Lion 79.... Aug. 

Green Soot Mystery. The.. Jack Lloyd Mutual, London 66 Sent 

Here's George George Clarke P.D.C.-Brltlth 64 Nov. 

Jack's the Boy Jack Hulbert Gaumont-Galns- 

borough Aug. IS. ...61 Sept. 24 

Josser on tho River Ernest Lotlnga British Int'n'l 71 Sept. 17 

Leap Year Tom Wails-Anno British and Do- 

Grey minions 89 Dec. 

Lodger, The Ivor Novell* Twickenham 84 Oct. 

Looking on the Bright Sid*. Grade Fields Assoc. Radio* 

British 82.... Oet 

Love Contract. The Owen Nares British and Do- 
minions 82 Aug 

Love on Wheels Jack Hulbert Gaumont-Galns- 

berough 87 Aug 

Mayor's Nest Sydney Howard British and Do- 

mlnloni 75 July It 

Night Like This. A Ralph Lynn British and Do- 
minions 73 May 21 

Nino Till Six Louise Hampton ...Asso. Radio- 
British 76.... May 21 

Sally BIshoft Harold Huth-Jean 

Barry British Lion 82 Dee. 10 

Thark Tom Walls- Ralph British and Do- 
Lynn minions 77 Aug. 27 

Weddino Rehearsal Roland Young ....London Film 

White Face John H. Roberts Gainsborough- 
British 71... June II 



31 
6 
3 
5 



17 
15 



13 



62 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



(THE RELEASE Cti ACT—CONT'D) 



SHCRT riLMS 

[All dates are 1932 unless otherwise 
stated] 



COLUMBIA 



Title 
CURIOSITIES 

C 234 May 

C 235 June 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



C 236 .....July 26. 

C 237 Sent. 



9 I reel 

7 i reel 



I reel 



1 10. 

KRAZY KAT KARTOONS 

Crystal Gazabo Nov. 7 

HIe-Cups. the Champ..... .May 28 7.. 

Lighthouse Keeping ....Aug. 15 

Minstrel Show. Tht Nov. 21.. 

Paperhanger June 21 

Prosperity Blues 

Ritzy Hotel ...May 9 

Seeing Stars Nov. 30 8.. 

Snow Man 

Wedding Bells 



.Sept. 24 



.Sept. 24 



.Dec. 17 



LAMBS GAMBOLS 

Ladies Not Allowed .......Sept. 8 

Shave It With Music Sept. 30 

Lambs All-star Gambol..... Dec. 20 

MEDBURY SERIES 
Laughing with Medbury 

In Wildwest Aug. II I reel 

Laughing with Medbury 

In Mandalay May 31...... I reel 

Laughing with Medbury 

In India I reel 

Laughing with Medbury 

In Philippines ..Nov. II I reel 

Laughing with Medbury 

Among the Wide Open 

Faces .Oct. II I reel 

Laughing with Medbury 

Among Dancing Nations 1 reel 

Laughing with Medbury 

In Wonders of the World I reel 

MICKEY MOUSE 

Mickey In Arabia July 20. 

Micltey's Revue May 27. 

Musical Farmer July II. 

SCRAPPY CARTOONS 

Bad Genius. The 

Battle of the Barn May 31. 

Camping Out Aug. 10. 

Fair Play July 2. 

False Alarm 

Famous B.ird Case, The 

Fencing Around 

Flop Heun ..Nov. 9. 

Stepping Stones May 17. 

Wolf at the Door, The Dec. 29. 



7 Dee. 10 



SILLY SYMPHONIES 
China Plate 7. 



. Dec. 



SUNRISE COMEDIES 

His Vacation Sept 

Mind Doesn't Matter 



EDUCATIONAL 



Title 

ANDY CLYDE COMEDIES 

A Fool About Women.. Nov. 

Boudoir Butler. The ..May 

Boy. Oh Boy! ....Dec. 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



27 22 



29. 

25. 



For the Love of Ludwlg.. .. .July 24... 



.22 
.21 



His Royal Shyness.. Aug. 

Sunkissed Sweeties Oct. 

The Genius 



28 21 

30 22 







. . Nov. 


12 




. June 


4 




..July 


23 



BABY BURLESKS 

Glad Rags to Riches II Dec. 31 

Kid' In' Hollywood 

Kid's Last Fight, The 9 Dec. 3 

Pie-Covered Wagon Oct. 30 10 Dec. 31 

War Babies Sept. 18 10 Aug. 6 

BATTLE FOR LIFE 

Battle of the Centuries Oct. 2 9 

Desert Demons Nov. 27 

Killers Oct. 30 10 



BRAY'S NATURGRAPHS 

An Oregon Camera Hunt Sent. 

Our Bird Citizens Oct. 

Our Noble Ancestors Dec. 

Stable Manners Nov. 

Wild Company Jan. 

BROADWAY GOSSIP 



II 

9 

4 

6 

I. '33.. 



9 ... 
8.... 



.Dec. 



No. I Sept. 25.. 

No. 2 Dee. II.. 



... 9 Dec. 



CAMERA ADVENTURES 

Taming the Wildcat Jan. 15.33. 

The Forgotten Island Sept 4 

The Icetess Arctic Nov. 6 



.10 
.11 

CANNiBALS OF THE DEEP 

Freaks of the Deep... May 29 7 

Sea Going Birds July 3 7 

DO YOU REMEMBER 

Gasllt Nineties. The Nov. 27 8 

Old New York Sent. II 10 

When Dad Was a Boy Jan. 22.'33... 8 

GLEASON'S SPORT 

FEATURETTES 

A Hockey Hick Dec. II 19. 

Always KIckIn' Oct. 9 20 

Off His Base Sept. 18 20 

GREAT HOKUM MYSTERY 

Burned at the Steak Oct. 16.... 

Evil Eye Congucrs, Th«.....Jan. 8,'33. 



.18 



Hypnotizing for Love.. Aug. 21 16 Sent 17 



Title 
HODGE-PODGE 
Across America in Ten 

Minutes Jan. 

Animal Fair, The Jan. 

Bubble Blowers Sept. 

Down on the Farm Dec. 

Fury of the Storm July 

Little Thrills Oct 

Prowlers, The May 

Traffic Nov. 

Women's Work Sept. 

Wonder City, The Nov. 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



15,33.. . 10 

I, '33 

II 10. 

18 10 

3 9. 

23 9. 

I 9. 

6 

25 9. 

20 9.. 



IDEAL COMEDIES 
(Brooks-Flynn) 
Hollywood Lights . 

MACK SENNETT 
COMEDIES 



.May 



.20 



MACK SENNETT 
FEATURETTES 

Hatta Marri 

Harry G ribbon 
Spot on the Rug. The.. 
Billy Bevan 



..July 10. 
..May IS. 



.20. 
. 18. 



MERMAID COMEDIES 
Big Flash. The Nov. 

Harry Langdon 
Hitch Hiker, The 

Harry Langdon 
Pest, The 

Harry Langdon 
Tired Feet Jan. 

Harry Langdon 
Vest with a Tale, The Dee, 

Tom Howard 

OPERALOGUES 

Brahmin's Daughter. A Jan. 

Idol of Seville Aug. 

Milady's Escapade May 

Walpurgis NIgbt Oct 

SPIRIT OF THE CAMPUS 

Cornell Dee. 

Michigan Deo. 

Yale Get 

TERRY-TOONS 

Burlesgue Sept. 

Bluebeard's Brother May 

Cocky Cock Roach July 

College Spirit Oct 

Farmer Al Falfa't Ape 

Gh*! Aug. 

Farmer Al Falfa's Bedtime 

Story June 

Farmer Al Falfa's Birthday 

Party Oct. 

Forty Thieves. The Nov. 

Hollywood Diet Dee. 

Hook and Ladder No. I Oct. 

Ireland or Bust Dee. 

Jealous Lover Jan. 

Mad King, The June 

Robin Hood Jan. 

Romance May 

Sherman Was Right Aug. 

Southern Rhythm Sept. 

Soring Is Here July 

Toyland Nov. 

Woodland May 

TOM HOWARD COMEDIES 

A Drug on the Market Jan. 

The Acid Test Nov. 

The Mouse Trapper Sent. 

TORCHY COMEDIES 
(Ray Cooke) 

Torchy's Busy Day Oct. 

Torchy's Kitty Coup Jan. 

Torchy Rolls His Own Nov. 

Torchy's Two Toots June 

VANITY COMEDIES 

Hollywood Run-Around Dec. 

Monty Collins 
Honeymoon Beach Oct. 

Billy Bevan-Glenn Tryon 
Keyhole Katie ..Jan. 

Gale Seabrook-John T. 
Murray 

Now's the Time , June 

Harry Barris 
Shin A-Hooey Aug. 

Glenn Tryon 



6 22.. 



I.'SS. 
4..,, 



S,'33. 
28.... 
15.... 
30.... 



.22. 



.22 
.21. 
.21. 
.20. 



18. 

4. 

9. 



, 9.. 

8.. 
. 10.. 



4.. 

29.. 
10.. 
16.. 



12 

2 

13..,, 
II.... 
30.... 
25.... 

8.'33. 
26.... 
22,'33. 
IS.... 
21.... 
18. .. 

24 

27 

I... 



22,'33. 
27.... 
II.... 



.11. 
.12. 



2.... 
22.'33. 
20.... 

5.... 



18.... 
.23... 
I5.'33. 

12.... 
7.... 



.20 
.20. 
.21. 
.20. 



.20. 



.21. 



.20. 
.22. 



FOX FILMS 



..July 30 



.May 



.Apr. 30 





July 


17 . 


..20... 






Andy Cidye 
















19... 


..19... 


..Aug. 


13 


Granger- Pangborn 
















22.. 




...May 


21 


Raymond Hatton 














24,,. 


..19... 






Arthur Stone- D. Granger 
















14 .. 








Stone-Granger 














Sent 


18... 


..19... 


. .Sept. 


10 


Harvey- Granger 













.July 2 
.May 21 



.Oct IS 



.July 30 
.Apr. 30 



.Dee. 17 



.July 9 
.July 16 



.June 18 
.Dec. 3 



. Nov. 5 



.July 23 
. May ■ 'm 



.Aug. 13 

.Dee. 17 



.May 14 



.June 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



Title 

MAGIC CARPET SERIES 

28 Big Game of the Sra....Aug. 28 8.... 

29 Manhattan Medley Sept 18 10 

30 By- Ways of France Sept. 11 9 

31 Zanzibar ..Oct. 9 9 

32 Incredible India ....Aug. 21 9 

33 The Tom-Tom Trail.. Sept. 4 9 

34 Over the Bounding Main 9 

35 Belles of Ball Oct 16 8.... 

36 Fisherman's Fortune ....Oct. 2 9 

37 RhlRoland Memories Sept. 25 8 

38 Pirate Isles Nov. 27 9.... 

39 Sampans and Shadows.. 9 

40 In the Clouds 9 



.Dee. 17 



Iq the Clutches of Death Nov. 13. 



.14 



41 Sailing a Souare-Rigger. .Oct. 23 10.. 

42 In the Gulanas Dec. 25 9.. 

43 Venetian Holiday ....Oct 30 10.. 

44 Havana Hoi Nov. 6 9.. 

45 Paths In Palestine Nov. 13 8.. 

46 The Lure of the Orient. . .Jan. 8,'33... 9.. 

47 Mediterranean Memories.. Jan. I, '33 

48 The Iceberg Patrol 

49 Silver Springs Dec. II 



..Dee. 10 
.".'not; ■ ■ 12 



. Nov. 19 



Running Time 

Title Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

50 Broadway by Day 

51 Here Comes the Circus. . .Jan. I5,'33 

52 Desert Trlooll ...Dec. 18 

53 Alpine Echoes Aug. 14 

54 Ricksha Rhythm Nov. 20 

55 From Kashmir to the 
Khyber Dec. 4 9. 

56 Sicilian Sunshine Jan. 22,'33 

57 Boardwalks of New York 

58 When in Rome Feb. 5,'33 

59 Gorges of the Giants Jan. 29,'33.,, 9 Dec, 31 

60 Rhapsody of the Rails 

61 Mississippi Showboats 

62 Berlin Medley 9 Nov. 2« 



METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 



Title 

BOY FRIENDS. THE 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



Too Many Women May 14 19. 

Wild Babies June 18 17. 



...20. 



CHARLEY CHASE 

Fallen Arches 

First In War May 28. 

Girl Grief Oct. 8. 

Mr. Bride Dec. 24 

Now We'll Tell One Nov. 19 19.. 

Tarzan in the Wrong 

Young Ironsides Sent. 3 



.Apr. 



...Oct 22 



FITZPATRICK 
TRAVELTALKS 

Barbados and Trinidad Sent 24 9 

Come Back to Erin 9 June 4 

Leningrad 9 

Over the Seas to Borneo 9 

Rio the Magnificent 9 

Romantic Argentina Aug. 27 9 

World Dances. The 9 

FLIP. THE FROG 

Bully June 18 7 

Circus Aug. 27 

Music Lesson. The 

Office Boy. The. July 16 

Room Runners Aug. 13 

School Days May 14 7 



LAUREL & HARDY 

Chimn. The May 21... 

County Hospital June 25... 

Scram Sept. 10... 

Their First Mistake 

Towed in a Hole 

Twice Two 



..25 Apr. • 

..20 Apr. 23 

..21 Oct IS 



ODDITIES 

Chili and Chills Sept 10 

Sea Spiders Aug. 13 9 Oct 29 

Toy Parade, The 7 Dee, 17 

OUR GANG 

A Lad An' A Lamp 

Birthday Blues Nov. 12 

Cheo Choo May 

Fish Hookey 

Forgotten Babies 

Free Wheeling Oct 

Hook and Ladder Aug. 

Pooch June 



20. 



.May 21 



1 

27 

4 21. 

PITTS-TODD 

Alum and Eve Sept. 24 18. 

Asleep In the Feet 

Old Bull June 4 20. 

Show Business Aug 20 

Sneak Easily 

Sellers, The Oct. 29 



May 28 



.Aug, IS 



.May 



SPORT CHAMPIONS 

Blocks and Tackles 

Chalk Up Dec. 10 10 

Desert Regatta Sent 17 ..10 

Duck Hunter's Paradise. .. .Dec. 31 10 

Football Footwork 

Old Spanish Custom Oct IS 10 

Pigskin 12 Dee. 10 

Snow Birds Aug. 20 10 

Swing High Nov. 12 10 Dee. 17 

Timber Toppers May 7 9 

TAXI BOYS 

Bring 'Em Back a Wife 

Hot Spot 18 Oet I 

Strange Innertube Sent. 22 

Taxi for Two 

Thundering Taxis Sept 17 

What Price Taxi Aug. 13 

Wreckety Wrecks ' ' 



PARAMOUNT PUBLIX 

Running Time 

Title Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 
HOLLYWOOD ON PARADE 
No. I Aug. 26 10 Aui. 13 

No. 2 Sent 23 1 reel 

No. 3 Oct 21 I reel 

No. 4 Nov. 18 I reel 

No. 5 Dec. 16 1 reel 

No. 6 Jan. 13,'33... 1 reel 

No. 7 Feb. 10.'33... I reel 

ONE REEL ACTS 

Be Like Me Feb. I8,'33... I reel 

Ethel Merman 

Breaking Even Sept. 30 

Tom Howard 

Bridge It Is May 13 

Tbi Musketeers 
Bun Voyage June 3 

Lester Allen 

Hawaiian Fantasy Jan. 20,'33 I reel 

Vincent Lopez 

Hollywood Beauty Hints July IS 

Irene July I 

Ethel Merman 

Meet the Winner May 6 

Tom Howard 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



63 



(THE RELEASE CHA.CT~C€NyD ) 



Running Time 

Title Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

Musical Doctor Oct. 28 10 Oct. I 

Rudy Vallee 

Patents Pending Auo. 5 

Burns and Allen . . 
Pro and Con • . .-iuly 8 

Tom Howard-Alan Brooks 
Rha«sody In Black & Blue... Scot. 2 

Louis Armstrong _ „, . ■ 
Rookie, The Dec. 23 I reel 

Tom Howard 

Seat on the Curb, A June 24 7 Aug. 13 

Hush Cameron 

Arthur Aylesworth . .„ .„ » 
Singapore Sue June 10 10 Aug. IS 

Anna Chang , , 
Ten Dollars or Ten Days ..July 22 

Eddie Younger and His 

Mountaineers 

Those Blues May 27 

Vincent Looez 

Your Hat Nov. 25 

Burns & Allen 

PARAMOUNT PICTORIAL- 
NEW SERIES 

No. I— Mists of the Morn- 
ing — Temple Bells of In- 
do-China — Famous Radio 
Personalities Aug. 

No. 2 — Just Mentioning the 
Unmentionable — New 
England Sunsets — Famous 
Radio Personalities Sept. 

No. 3 — Making Friends In 
the Desert— The Fall of 
the Year — Radio Star- 
Maker Oct. 

No. 4— Distinctive Hair for 
Distinctive Heads — The 
Blooming Desert — The 
Camels Are Coming Nov. 

No. S — John Mongol Comes 
to Town — Have a Little 
Ski — Meet Your Favorite 
Radio Personalities Dec. 

No. 6 — Land of Sun and 
Shine — La Rumba de 
Cuba— Big Shots of U. S. 
Navy pec. 

No. 7— Jan. 

No. 8— Feb. 



12 I reel 



9 I reel 



7 I reel 



4 I reel 



reel 



30 reel 

27, '33... I reel 
24,'33... 1 reel 



SCREEN SONGS 



Ain't She Sweet Feb. 3,'33 

Lillian Roth . „, , , 
Dinah Jan. I3,'33.. I reel 

Mills Bros. 
Down Among the Sugar 

Cane Aug. 26 

Lillian Roth 

I Ain't Got Nobody June 17 

Mills Bros. 

Just a Gigolo Soot 9 

Irene Bordoni ..... . ■ 

Let Me Call You Sweetheart .. May 20 I reel 

Ethel Merman _ . ..... , 

Reaching for the Moon Feb. 24,'33.. 1 reel 

Romantic Melodies Oct. 21 I reel 

The Street Singer 
Rudy Vallee Melodies Aug. 5 I reel 

Rudy Vallee 

Scheol Days Soot. 30 

Gus Edwards ... . . 
Shine On Harvest Moon May 6 1 reel 

Alice Joy 

Sing a Song Doe. 2 

James Melton 

Time On My Handi Dec. 23 

Ethel Merman 
When It's Sleepy Time 

Down South Nov. II I reel 

Boswell Sisters ... , 
You Try Somebody Else July 29 10 June 25 

Ethel Merman 



SCREEN SOUVENIRS 

No. II— Old Time Novelty. ..May 20. 
No. 12— Old Time Novelty. . .June 17. 



Running Time 

Title Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

TWO REEL COMEDIES 

Blue of the Night Sept. 10 

Bing Crosby 

Bridge it is May 13 

The Musketeers 
Bring 'Em Back Sober Nov. 18 2 reels 

Sennett Star 

Courting Trouble Oct. 28 19 Dec. 17 

Charles Murray 
Dentist. The Dec. 9 20 Dec. 3 

Sennett Star 

Door Knocker, The May 27 

Doubling in the Quickies Dec. 16 2 reels 

Sennett Star 

False impressions Nov. 4 2 reels 

Sennett Star 

Harem. Scarem Juno 10 2 reels 

Ai St. John 

Hawkins and Watkins, Inc.. July 8 22 Sept. 3 

His Perfect Day 

Sennett Star 

His Week End May 13 2 reels 

Johnny Burke 

Hollywood Double, A Nov. 25 2 reels 

Sennett Star 

Honeymoon Bridge 

Sennett Star 

Human Fish ..Dec. 30 2 reels 

Sennett Star 

Jimmy's New Yacht June 3 2 reels 

Light House Love May 6 2 reels 

Ma's Pride and Joy Oct. 14 18 Aug. 27 

Donald Novis 

Meet the Senator May 2ft 2 reels 

Prosperity Pays (Tent.) Nov. 4 

Tom Howard 

Singing Plumber Sept. 23 

Donald Novis 

Singing Boxer, The Jan. 27,'33 

Up Popped The Ghost July 22 

What Price Air June 24 20 June IB 

Tom Howard 

Wrestlers, The Jan. 20,'33 

Sennett Star 



POWERS PICTURES 



Title 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



Dream Flowers Sept. 15 9 

Dual Control Sent i 12 

(Capt. James A. Molll- 
son-Amy Johnson) 

It All Oeoonds on You Nov. 1 8 

Land of Mv Fathers 9 

Land of the Shamrocks 10 Apr. 2 

Light of Love Oct. IS 9 

Me and the Boy Friend Oct. 1 8 

Mystery of Marriage, The 18 Apr. 2 

Special Messengers 9 Mar. 26 



RKO-RADIO PICTURES 



Title 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



CHARLIE CHAPLIN SERIES (Re-Issues) 

The Cura Aug. 19. 

Easy Street Sept. 30. 

The Floorwalker Dec. 30.. 

The Rink Nov. II. 



.20 

.l9'/2....Dec. 
. .201/2 



reel 
reel 



CLARK AND McCULLOUGH SERIES 

Ice Man's Ball Aug. 12 20 Aug. 13 

Jitters, The Butler Dec. 30 20'/2 Aug. 20 

Millionaire Cat. Tha Oct. 21 21 

The Gay Nighties 18 Dec. 31 



HARRY SWEET COMEDIES 

FIrehouse Honeymoon Oct. 28 18 

Just a Pain in a Parlor.. ..Aug. 28 20 



STATE RIGHTS 



Title 

ATLANTIC FILM 

Playgrounds In the Sky 

Sportsmen's Paradlsa 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



.10 Nov. 5 

, 10 July 30 



CAESAR FILMS 
Veneziana i reel 



CAPITAL 

isle of Isolation 10 July 30 

CENTRAL FILM 

A Pilgrimage Through Palestine 10 Dee. 3 

in Old New Orleans May 28 

Syria May 21 

FEATURETTES, INC. 

A Night in the Jungle 10 Apr. 30 

Holy Men of India 10 May 7 

IDEAL 

Evolution 28 Sept. 3 

MARY WARNER 

Glimpses of Germany 8 

Playgrounds in the Sky i reel 

Sportman's Paradise, A 1 reel 

Springtime on the Rhine 7 

The Mosei 8 Oct. IS 

Trier, Oldest City in 
Germany 6 

Winter in the Bavarian Alps 1 reel 

Young Germany Goes Ski- 
ing I reel 

MASTER ART PRODUCTS 
Melody Makers Series 

No. I— Sammy Fain 10 Dec. 24 



PRINCIPAL 

Cock-Eyed Animal World 35 July 23 

Get That Lion 29 Aug. 27 

Isle of Desire 3 reels 

Isle of Peril 32 July 16 

Isles of Love I reel 

Killing the Killer II July 30 

Mexico 43 June II 

Primitive , I reel 

Tiger Hunt, The 20..^. .Dec. 31 

STANLEY 

An Old City Sneaks 15 

I Love a Parade 

Pep. Vim and Vigor 7 

Sponge Divers of Tarpon Nov. 2 II Dec. 31 



UFA 

Cod Liver Oil Preferred 
Last Pelicans in Europe. 
Steel 



22 June II 

10 May 7 

10 May 21 



UNITED ARTISTS 



Title 
MICKEY MOUSE 



Running Time 
Rel. Oato Minutes Reviewed 











2. 






26 


3. 




.Sept 


16. 


4. 






7 


5. 


The Wayward Canary. 


.Oct 


28 


6. 


The Klondike Kid.... 


Nov. 


18. 


7. 






9 



6'/2 

VU 



8. 



SILLY SYMPHONIES 

1. Bears and Bees July 15 6</2 

2. Just Dogs Aug. 12 7 

3. Flowers and Trees Sent 9 8 Oct IS 

4. Bug In Love Sept. 21 7 

5. King Neptune Oct 7 7 Oct 29 

6. Babes in the Wood Dec. 2 8 

7. Santa's Workshop Dec. 30 7 Dec. 24 



SCREEN SOUVENIRS — NEW SERIES 



No. I 



Aug. 




i reel 


Sept. 


2.... 


1 reel 


Sept 


30. ... 


10 


Oct. 


28. . . . 


i reel 


Nov. 




1 reel 


Doe. 


23, ... 


1 reel 




20.'33. 
I7.'33.. 


1 reel 


Feb. 


1 reel 



..Oct 15 



PARAMOUNT SOUND NEWS 
Two Editions Weekly 

SPORTS EYE VIEW 

Building Winners Aug. 19 i reel . 

Canine Thrills Feb. 3,'33.. I reel .... 

Catch 'Em Young Dec. 9 i reel 

Fighting Fins Oct. 14 10 Oct 

Over the Jumps .Jan. 6,'33... I reel .... 

Stuff on the Ball Nov. il I reel 

Water Jamboree Sept. 16 I reel 



15 



TALKARTOONS 

Admission Free June 10 

Betty Boon's Bamboo Isle.. Sept 23 

Betty Boop's BIzzy Bee Aug. 19 i reel 

Betty Beep's Crazy Inventions . .Jan. 27,'33..l reel 

Bet^ Boon tor President.... Nov. 4 7 Oct. I 

Betty Boon's Ker-Choo Jan. 6,'33... 7 Dec. 10 

Botty Boon Limited July I I reel 

Betty Boop, M.D Sept. 2 7 Dee. 10 

Betty Boop's Museum Dee. 16 1 reel 

Betty Boon's Ups & Downs.. Oct 14 I reel 

Chess Nuts May 13 

Hide and Seek May 27 7 Apr. 16 

is My Palm Read Feb. i7,'33. . 1 reel 

Kidnapping (Tent.) July I I reel 

Minding the Baby Sept. 26 I reel 

Stopping the Show Aug. 12 



HEADLINER SERIES 

Shampoo, the Magician Nov. 25. 

Roscoo Ates-Hugh Herbert 



MASaUERS COMEDIES 

Bride's Bereavement, The... Nov. 28 20 

Iron Minnie July 4 

Rule 'Em and Wee* May 2 19 May 21 

Through Thin and Ticket 

Two Lips and Juleps Soot, 9 20 



.7 UNIVERSAL 



MICKEY McGUIRE SERIES 

Mickey's Big Business May 21 

Mickey's Busy Day Sent 2 18 Aug. 6 

Mickey's Charity Dee. 2 18 

Mickey's Golden Rule June 4 19 



MR. AVERAGE MAN COMEDIES 

(EDGAR KENNEDY) 

Giggle Water June 28 20 May 21 

Golf Chump, The Aug, 5 .20 Aug. 13 

Parlor. Bedroom and Wrath.. Oct l4.....20'/> 



PATHE NEWS 

Released twice a week 
PATHE REVIEW 

Released once a month 



TOM AND JERRY SERIES " l ~ 

Barnyard Bunk Sept. 16 6 

Jolly Fish Aug. 19 6 

Pencil Mania Dec. 9 

Piano Tuners Nov. II 

Plane Dumb June 25 7 

Pets and Pans May 14 8 

Redskin Blues July 23 7 

Spanish Twist A Oct 14 6 

Tuba Teeter, The June 4 7 May 21 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



Title 

OSWALD CARTOONS 

Busy Barber Sept 12 I reel 

Carnival Capers Oct. 10 1 reel 

Catnipped May 23 7 June 2S 

Day Nurse Auo. I I reel 

Jungle Jumble, A July 4 I reel 

Oswald, the Plumber Jan. I6,'33... 7 

Teacher's Pest Dee. 19 

To The Rescue May 23 

Wet Knight. A June 20 I reel 

Wild and Wooly Nov. 21 I real 

Winged Horse May % I real 

POOCH CARTOONS 

Athlete, The Aug. 29 8 Sept 10 

Butcher Boy, The Sept. 26 7 Sent. 17 

Cat and Dogs Dee. 5 I reel 

Crowd Snores, The Oct 24 I reel 

Merry Dog, The Jan. 2,'33... I reel 

Terrible Troubador, The i reel 

Underdog, The.. Nov. 7 I reel 

RADIO REELS 







31... 




With Vincent Lopez 












14. . . 




Nick Kenny— No. 1 












28... 




With Brown and 








Henderson 

















Nick Kenny— No. 2 
Down Memory Lane Dec. 26 I reel 

Louis Sebol — No. I 

With Texas Guinan 
I Know Everybody and 

Evecvbody's Racket Jan. 23,'33 

Waiter Winchell— No. I 

With Paul Whiteman 



64 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



(THE RELEASE Cti ACT—CONT'D) 



Title 
SPORT REELS 
Ruaolng with Paddock Aor. II. 

Chas. Paddock 
Victory Plays May 2. 

Tilden Tennis Reel 

STRANGE AS IT SEEMS SERIES 
No. 19— Novelty 



Running Tine 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



.10. 
. 9. 



.Apr. 
.May 



23 



No. 22— Novelty 



May 


16 


1 reel 


July 




1 reel 


Aug. 




1 reel 


Soot 


19 


1 reel 


Oct 


17 


1 reel 


Nov. 




1 reel 


Dee. 


12 


1 reel 


Jan. 


9.'S3... 


1 reel 



UNIVERSAL BREVITIES 

Bool Dec. 26 I reel 

Dr. Jekyll's Hide Sent. 26 9 Oct. 

Good Old Days, The Nov. 21 I reel 

Greeks Had Ne Wordt for . , , 

Them. The Oct. 24...... 1 reel 

Lizzie Strata Jan. 23,'33. .. 1 reel 



UNIVERSAL COMEDIES 
(1931-32 SEASON) 

Around the Equator en 

Roller Skates July 

Around the World In 18 

Minutes June 

Dancing Daddlae 

E. Lambert 

Doctor's Orders June 

Hollywood Kids July 

Failed Again June 

Hollywood Handicap, A Aug. 

In the Baa Anr. 

Marriage Wow, The Aor. 

Bert Roach 
Meet the Princess May 

Slim Summerville 
(1932-33 SEASON) 
Boys Will Be Boys Nov. 

Frank Albertson 
Family Troubles Jan. 

Henry Armetta 
Finishing Touch Oct. 

Skeets Gallagher-June Clyde 
Hesitating Love Nov. 

L. Fazenda-M. Prevost 
Kid Glove Kisses Sent. 

Slim Summerville 
Lights Out Dec. 

James Gleason 
My Operatlea Dec. 

Vince Barnett-June Clyde 
Officer, Save My Child Nov. 

Slim Summerville 
Rockahye Cowboy Jan. 

James Gleason 
Union Wages Aug. 

Louise Fazenda 
Who. Me Sept. 

Frank Albertson 
Voo Hoo! Oct. 

James Gleason 



28 2 reels 

19. 



.18 
. 17. 



.May 21 



29 2 reels 

13 2 reels 

1 2 reels 

10 2 reels 

5 21 Mar. 26 

20 16 Mar. 26 



. 17. 



.Apr. 16 



30 2 reels 

1 1. '33... 2 reels 

19 2 reels 

16 2 reels 

21 2 reels 

14 2 reels 

28 2 reels 

2 2 reels 

25,'33. . . 2 reels 

31 20 Sept. 17 

7 2 reels 

5 21 Sept. 3 



VITAPHONE SHORTS 

Running Time 

Title Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

ADVENTURES IN AFRICA 2 reels 

BELIEVE IT OR NOT— I reel 

ROBERT L. RIPLEY 

BIG STAR COMEDIES 



2S 



No. 6— Shake a Leg 17 

Thelma White and Fanny 

Watson „ , 
No. 7— The Perfect Suitor 2 reels 

Benny Rubin ... 
No. 8— Maybe I'm Wrong 18 May 

RIchy Craig. Jr. 
No. 9— The Toreador 17 May 

Joe Penner „ 
No. 10— On Edge 19 May 

Wm. and Joe Mandel 
(Jo. II— Poor but Dishonest 2 reels 

Thelma White and Fanny 

Watson . , 

No. 12— In the Family 2 reels 

Thelma White and Fanny 
Watson 



BIQ V COMEDIES 

Ne. I — Sherlock's Heme .. . 

Jack Haley 
No. 2— Here. Prince 

Joe Penner 
No. 3— You Call It Madness . 

Rlchy Craig. Jr. 
Ne. 4 — Hey. Pop 

Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuekle 
No. 5 — Then Came the Yawn . 

Jack Haley 
N«. 6 — The Run Around... . 

William Demarest 
No. 7 — Trouble Indemnity. . 

Codee and Orth 
No. 8— The Bulld-Up 

Jack Haley 



BOOTH TARKINGTON SERIES 

No. 7— Hot Doa ! f"! 

Ne. 8— Penrod's Bull Pen I reel 

Billy Hayes- Dave Gercey 



BROADWAY BREVITIES 

No. 8— Absentmlnded Abner 2 reoU 

Jack Haley , , 

Ne. 8— A Regular Treuser 19 July 23 

Ruth Etting , . 

No. 10— A Mall Bride I« J""* * 

Ruth Etting 

Ne. II — Artistic Temper 

Ruth Etting , 
No. 12— What an Idea 18 June 25 

Harriet Hllllard 



Title 



BROADWAY BREVITIES 
(NEW SERIES) 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



No. I — Passing the Buck 2 reels 

No. 2 — Tip. Tap. Toe 

No. 3 — A Modern Cinderella 

No. A — The Red Shadow 

No. 5 — Sky Symphony 

No. 6— Poor Little Rich Bey 

No. 7 — Yours Sincerely 

No. 8 — That Goes Double 

No. 9— Win. Lose or Draw 



HOW TO PLAY GOLF- 
BOBBY JONES 



. 1 reel 
(each) 



LOONEY TUNES SERIES 

No. 8— Boske's Party 7 May 7 

Ne. 9— Bosko and Brime 7 Dee. 10 

No. 10— Bosko's Dog Race 8 July 8 

No. II— Bosko at the Beach 7 Nov. 5 

No. 12 — Bosko's Store 7 

No. 13 — Bosko the Lumber- 

Jack 

LOONEY TUNES 
(NEW SERIES) 

No. I— Ride Him. Bosko 

No. 2 — Bosko the Drawback 

No. 3 — Bosko's Dizzy Date 

No. 4 — Bosko's Woodland Dazo 

No. 5 — Bosko in Dutch 

No. 6 — Bosko in Person 

MELODY MASTERS 
(NEW SERIES) 

No. I — Music to My Ears 

Jack Denny and Band 

No. 2 — Municloal Band Wagon 

No. 3 — Smash Your Baggage 

Small's Paradise Band 
No. A — The Lease Breakers 9 Dee. 3 

Aunt Jemima 

No. 5— The Yacht Party 

Roger Wolfe Kahn's Band 
No. 6 — Hot Competition 

The Continentals-Barrls- 

Whiteman-Ted Huslng 

No. 7 — Abe Lyman and Band 

No. 8 — "How's Tricks?" 

Jean Sargent-George Owen and Gang 
No. 9— That's the Spirit 

Noble Sissle and Band 

MERRY MELODIES (New Series) 

No. 1— You're Too Careless with Your Kisses 8 Dec. 17 

No. 2—1 Wish I Had Wings 

No. 3— A Great Big Bunch of You 

No. 4 — Three's a Crowd 

No. 5 — Shanty Where Santa Claus Lives 



MERRY MELODIES 
SONG CARTOONS 

No. 9 — Goopy Gear 5 

No. 10— It's Got Me Again 6 

No. 1 1— Moonlight for Two 7 

No. 12 — The Queen Was In 

the Parlor 7 

No. 13 — I Love a Parade 7 



Apr. 30 

June II 

July 2 

July 23 



THE NAGGERS SERIES 

MR. AND MRS. JACK NORWORTH 

The Naggers' Anniversary I reel 

The Naggers at the Opera I reel 

The Naggers Go Ritzy 10...... June 4 

Movie Dumb ,1 i.-.iJ- ih 

Four Wheels— No Brakes 10 JuW 30 



NOVELTIES 

Bigger They are. The 2 reels 

Prime Camera , 
Gypsy Caravan ' reel . 

Martineill . 
Handy Guy. The 2 reels 

Earl Sando . , 

Rhythms of a Big City I reel . 

Season's Greetings. The » 

Christmas Special , , 

Trio to Tibet. A ' reel . 

Washington. The Man and 

the Capital '8 

Clarence Whitehlll 



ONE-REEL COMEDIES 

Baby Face 

Victor More 
Military Post. The 

Roberto Guzman 
No-Account. The .... 

Hardie-Hutchison 
No Questions Asked... 

Little Billy 
Strong Arm, The .... 

Harrington-O'Neill 



ORGAN SONG-NATAS 

For You I reel 

Organ -Vocal , , 

Say a Little Prayer for Me I reel 

Organ -Vocal 

When Your Lever Has Gene I reel 

Organ-Vocal 



Title 
PEPPER POT 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 



JOE PENNER COMEDIES 

Moving In 2 reels 

Rough Sailing IB...... 

Stutterless Romance. A I reel . 

Where Men Are Men 2 reels 



PEPPER POT SERIES 
No. 1 1— Napoleon's Bust 



.10. 



Dan Coleman-Ted Huslng 

No. 12 — Featurette Movie Album 

No. 13— Movie Album Thrills 10. 



(NEW SERIES) 

No. 1 — Rambling Round Radio Row No. i 

No. 2— Nickelette 

Ne. 3 — Contact 

Ne. 4— If I'm Elected 

No. S — King Salmon 

Ne. 6 — Rambling Round Radio Row No. 2 

No. 7 — Babe 0' Mine 

Ne. 8 — Dangerous Occupations 

No. 9— Out of the Past 

No. 10 — Love Thy Neighbor 

No. 11 — Rambling Round Radio Row No. 3 

Ne. 12— A Whale of ■ Ywn 

No. 13— Africa Sneaks— English 

No. 14 — Rambling Round Radio Row No. 4 

Ne. 15— Inklings 

Ne. 16 — Parade* *f Yesterday 

No. 17— MIssltslDil Suite 

N*. 18— Little White Lies 

Ne. 10 — Rambling Round Radio Row Ne. 5 

No. 20— You're Klllino Me 

No. 21— Old Time News Reel 

No. 22 — Rambling Round Radio Row Ne. 6 

Ne. 23— Around the World In 8 Minutes.... 8 Aug. 20 



SPORT THRILLS SERIES 
TED HUSING 

No. I 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 4— Old Time Sport Thrills. 

No. 5— 



S. S. VAN DINE MYSTERY SERIES 

(Donald Meek-John Hamilton) 

No. 2— The Wall Street Mystery 

No. 3— The Week- End Mystery 

No. A — Symphony Murder Mystery 

No. 5 — Studio Murder Mystery 

No. 6 — Skull Murder Mystery, The 2 reels 

No. 7 — The Cole Case 26 Apr. 23 

No. 8 — Murder In the Pullman 28 June 4 

Ne. 9— The Side Show Mystery 20. June II 

No. 10 — Campus Mystery, The 

No. II — Crane Poison Case, The 

Ne. 12— Transatlantic Mystery, The 22 Sept. It 



TECHNICOLOR MUSICAL REVUES 

No. 1 — Cost Paree 

No. 2— Tee for Two 16 Nov. 12 

No. 3— Heyl Heyl Westerner IS Oet 15 

No. 4 — Northern Exposure 

No. 5— Pickin' a Winner 16 Sept. 17 

No. 6 — Pleasure Island 



TWO-REEL COMEDIES 

Dandy and the Belle, The.. 
Frank McGlynn. Jr.-Mary 
Murray 

Freshman Love 

Ruth Etting 
Old Lace 

Ruth Etting 



WORLD TRAVEL TALKS— 
E. M. NEWMAN 

No. 1 — Little Journeys to 

Great Masters I reel 

No. 2 — Southern India 9 

No. 3 — Road to Mandalay 1 reel 

No. 4 — Mediterranean By- 
ways 9 

No. 5— Javanese Journeys 9 

No. 6 — Northern India 1 reel 

No. 7 — Oberammergau 1 reel 

No. 8 — South American 

Journeys 9 June 2B 

No. 9 — Soviet Russia I reel 

No. 10— Paris Glimpses 9 July SO 

No. II — Dear Old London I reel 

No. 12 — When In Rome 9 Juno IS 

No. 13— Berlin Today 9 Oct. 29 



WORLD ADVENTURES 

E. M. NEWMAN (New Series) 



1 — Dancing Around the World I reel 

2 — Transportations of the World I reel 

3— An Oriental Cocktail IS 

No. A — Curious Customs of the World I reel 

No. 5 — From Bethlehem to Jerusalem 1 reel 

6— High Soots of the Far East 10 

7 — Main Streets 1 reel 



No. 
No 
No 



No 

No, 





Oet. 


S 


Sent.' 





No. 8 — Beauty Spots of the World I reel 



SERIALS 

UNIVERSAL 

(EACH SERIAL 12 EPISODES OF TWO REELS) 



Running Time 
Rel. Date Minutes Reviewed 

.!• Apr. It 

(each) 



28.. 



.Juno 25 



.July 23 



TiUe 

Air Mall Mystery Mar. 

Jas. Flavln-Lucllla Brovme 
Clancy of the Mounted Feb. 27.'33. 

Tom Tyler-Jactueline Wells 
Detective Lloyd Jan. 4..., 

Jack Lloyd 

Horses of the West June 20 18 June It 

Noah Berry, Jr. (each) 

Lost Special Dec. 5 

Frank Albertson 

Jungle Mystery Sept. 12 20 ... 

Tom Tyler (each) 



.20 Jan. 16 

(each) 



January 7,1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



65 



NEWS PICTURES 



FOX MOVIETONE NEWS— No. 29— Grain plants 
crash in $1,000,000 fire on Chicago River — Dempsey 
in debut as promoter — Gigli sings in Berlin — Musso- 
'lini's sons run newspaper — Snow plows uncover 
villages in Snoqualmie Pass, Wash. — 'Walrus per- 
forms for Berlin people — John D. Rockefeller plays 
golf at Ormond Beach, Fla. 

FOX MOVIETONE NEWS— No. 30— Pictures of last 
New Year's celebration in New York — Winter rac- 
ing on in Mexico — -World opinion of 1932 — Buffalo 
herd round up for winter shelter at Yellowstone 
Park. 

HEARST METROTONE NEWS— No. 228— Sport 
season opens at Agua Caliente, Mexico — Young 
Protestants birthday celebrated in Germany — 
Cameraman flies winter Alps — Round up bufifalo 
at Yellowstone Park — Fog blankets New York 
harbor, delaying ocean liners — Sport thrills of 1932. 

HEARST METROTONE NEWS— No.. 229-Phila- 
delphia welcomes New Year — China trains army for 
bandit war — New Year hints for bowlers — United 
States nabs foreign stowaway — Mushers race in 
Yosemite Valley, Cal. — Lehman inaugurated at Al- 
bany, N. Y. — Happy days arrive for fishermen — 
Auto daredevil performs at Coral Gables, Fla. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS— No. 43— Racing season opens 
at Agua Caliente, Mexico — Los Angeles pardons dry 
law prisoners — Mine cave -in kills 39 at Moweaqua, 
111. ; Grain elevator blaze kills two in Chicago — 

PARAMpUNT NEWS— No. 44— England claims 
world's' fastest train — Freighter Pershing launched 
at Oregon— Babe Didrikson turns professional — 
Pictures of New York's first 1933 baby crop — Navy 
eagles test latest equipment at 'Toulon, France — 
Diver perfortns at Bart, Texas — Fourteen die in 
Tokyo fire — Pictures of Burns and Allen, radio en- 
tertainers. 

PATHE NEWS— No. 44— Highlights of 1932-Lind- 
bergh baby kidnapping— America's triumph in 
Olympics — Presidential campaign — Solar eclipse and 
world turmoil — Building Rockefeller Center— Build- 
ing Hoover Dam — Amelia Earhart flies Atlantic — 
Indianapolis Speedway classic — Pictures of Sam 
InsuU, Al Capone and Jimmy Walker. 

PATHE NEWS-^No. 45 — Race season opens at Agua 
Caliente, Mexico — American people reveal their 
hopes for 1933 — Hair show held in New York— Walls 
crash in grain fire at Chicago — Huskies train in 
snow for derby _ at W'onalancet, N. H. — Miners 
trapped in explosion at Moweaqua, 111. — Amy John- 
son arrives in London — News flashes. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSPAPER NEWSREEL— No. 106— 
Amy Johnson hailed in _ England — Hurricane hits 
England, Arlo. — Nation joins in celeibration for 
orphans at Havana, Cuba — Sea police battle waves 
on Little Diamond Island, Me. — Boston, Mass., 
scientists gain in war against paralysis — Convict 
grid squads play scoreless tie at Joliet, 111.— Cattle 
perish in snowdrifts at Pitchfork, Wyo. — Racing 
season opens at Agua Caliente, Mexico. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSPAPER NEWSREEI^No. 107 
— Pictures of train wreck at Cheektowaga, N. Y. — 
Paris holds cross-country race — Cooperative town 
formed by jobless at Oakland, Cal. — Swim records 
fall at Miami, Fla. — Girl's eye contest held at 
Chicago— New stream-lined train tested at Ham- 
burg, Germany — Huskies set record at Yosemite 
Valley, Cal.— Big cities welcome 1933. 



Educational Gets Volcano Subject 

Educational has acquired a two-reel pic- 
ture showing the undersea volcano, Kraka- 
tau, in action, and will release it as a 
two-reel short subject under the title, 
"Krakatau." The volcano is located between 
the islands of Java and Sumatra. J. H. 
Bekker and other scientists filmed the sub- 
ject. 



Dent Takes 10 Short Subjects 

Captain Harold Auten, representing Bev- 
erly Hills Exchanges, of which Stanley 
Hatch is New York representative, has sold 
the company's 10 three-reel novelty subjects 
to Arthur Dent of British International 
Pictures and Wardour Films, London. 
Four of the subjects have already been com- 
pleted. 



Do New Musical Short Series 

Master Art Products, Inc., of which E. 
Schwartz is president, is producing a series 
of musical shorts, the first of which last 
week was run at the Rivoli in New York. 
Titled "Melody Makers," the subjects show 
famed popular composers playing their own 
compositions. 



UP AND DCWN 
THE ALLCy 



Floyd Wright, former solo organist at the 
California and United Artists theatres of 
Berkeley, California, recently wed Miss 
Rosina Anderson of Oakland, and they are 
now making their home in San Francisco, 
where Floyd is featured organist with 
Horace Heidt's orchestra at the Golden 
Gate. ... 

V V V 

Little Katharine Kaderly of the Denver 
theatre at Denver, Col., received reams of 
write-ups for her clever 1932-33 celebration 
organ solo. . . . Miss Kaderly is popular 
in Denver, having christened the twin con- 
soles at the Paramount with Eloise (Jean) 
Rowan, who is now in Minneapolis. . . . 

V V V 

Charlie Paul, maestro of the fine orchestra 
at Loew's Valencia theatre, Jamaica, Long 
Island, is the possessor of one of the finest 
natural voices yours truly has ever heard 
in a picture theatre. . . . Recently Charlie, 
who is the fair-haired boy of this part of 
New York, surprised the audiences by sing- 
ing during the overture and drew such a big 
hand at the finish that he rated an encore, 
but didn't take it. . . . 

V V V 

Don Carew, who found and exploited the 
popular Tommy McLaughlin, the new Col- 
umbia Broadcasting star, has turned over 
the business affairs of the warbler to his 
friend, Jimmy Doane, manager of Morton 
Downey. . . . Incidentally, Tommy is 
Downey's prodigy. . . . Carew is retaining 
the personal managership of Tommy even 
though he is busy as a bee working out the 
destiny of his new firm, which will represent 
artists and orchestras. . . . First of these 
are Frank Silver, of "Bananas" fame, and 
Ray Stillwell and his orchestra. ... It is 
also understood that Don anticipates man- 
aging a number of film stars, with whom he 
is now dickering. . . . 

V V V 

Con Maffie, whose likeness you see below, 
has played in nearly every city in the United 
States. . . . He started out in Chicago 
about seven years ago and went from there 
to the West Coast for Publix. . . . thence 
to a dozen other spots for the same com- 
pany. . . . Three years ago he was brought 
east by Warner Bros., to play the Earle, 
Philadelphia, going from there to the Para- 
dise, N. Y. C, for Loew's, where he has 
been featured since that time. . . . 

ED. DAWSON 



CON MArric 




LOEW'S PARADISE 
NEW YORK CITY 



ON BROADWAY 



Week of December 31 
CAPITOL 

Free Wheeling MGM 

HOLLYWOOD 

From Bethlehem to Jerusa- 
lem . . Vltaphone 

Shanty Where Santa Claus 

Lives Vitaphone 

Sport Thrills — No. 3 Vitaphone 

The Red Shadow Vitaphone 

MAYFAIR 

The Cure RKO Radio 

Auld Lang Syne RKO Radio 

The Minstrel Show Columbia 

PARAMOUNT 

Lion in the House Paramount 

Stuff on the Ball Paramount 

RIVOLI 

Hawaiian Fantasy Paramount 

Mickey's Good Deed United Artists 

Rio the Magnificent MGM 

ROXY 

Boulder Dam Principal 

Chalk Up MGM 

Jungle Babies Ideal 

The Music Lesson MGM 

STRAND 

From Bethlehem to Jerusa- 
lem Vitaphone 

Shanty Where Santa Claus 

Lives Vitaphone 

WARNER 

Passing the Buck Vitaphone 

Ride Him, Bosko Vitaphone 

Then Came the Yawn Vitaphone 

WINTER GARDEN 

Bosko's Dizzy Date Vitaphone 

Stuck, Stuck, Stucco Vitaphone 

The Street Singer Universal 



Stanley Plans Two-Reelers 

Ira H. Simmons, president of Stanley 
Distributing Corporation, has signed Nils 
T. Granlund, known as N. T. G., for a 
series of two-reel films, the first to be 
"Night Life of Broadway." With a cast of 
more than 100, the first film will include 
numerous stage and radio names. 



Cinevox To Produce Shorts 

Cinevox Productions Company has an- 
nounced that it will make 24 comedy shorts 
at the rate of two a month. The first, "Cane 
Trouble," will be ready in ten days. Offices 
of the company are at 151 West 46th street, 
New York. 



Gliclcman Succeeds Saland 

Harry Glickman has replaced Nat Sa- 
land, resigned, as president of Craft Film 
Laboratories. Mr. Glickman had been vice- 
president in charge of the laboratory. Mr. 
Saland is expected to announce his new 
plans shortly. 



Atlas Studios Cuts Prices 

The Atlas Soundfilm Studios, New York, 
has put into effect a downward revision of 
its price schedule. According to Ben Berk, 
vice-president, the revision is in line with 
current economic trends. 



66 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 7, 1933 



CLASSiriED 
ADVECTISlNe 



OP 



the great 
national medium 
for showmen 



Ten cents per word, nnoney-order or check with copy. Count initials, box number and address. Minimunn insertion, 
$1. Four insertions for the price of three. Contract rates on application. No borders or cuts. Forms close 
Mondays at 5 P.M. Publisher reserves right to reject any copy. Address correspondence, copy and checks to 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD, Classified Dept., 1790 Broadway, New York City. 



I^EPAII^ SEI^VICE 



WE CAN RECOMMEND YOU TO RELLABLE 
concerns who repair all sorts of theatre equipment. 
Let us know your needs. BOX 117A, MOTION 
PICTURE HERALD. 



USED ECUIPMENT 



DISTRESS SALE - COMPLETE EQUIPMENT 
including lease— Simplexes, Peerless, Rectifiers, Acces- 
sories, Screens, Drapes, Carpets, Box Office, Ticket 
Register, Upholstered Chairs etc. BOX 255, MOTION 
PICTURE HERALD. 



MARKETS FLOODEI>-EVERY DAY BRINGS NEW 
Opportunities— Consult S.O.S. Before Buying:— Bar- 
gains Weber Syncrofilm, LeRoy, Mellaphone, RCA, 
Universal, Toneograph, Pacent Soundheads, $35.00 up; 
Radiart, Operadio, Samson, Webster Amplifiers, 
$17.50 up; Jensen, DeCoster, RCA, Racon, Macy, 
Speakers, $12.95 up. Cash paid for used equipment. 
S.O.S. CORP., 1600 Broadway, New York. 



BARGAINS FOR THE NEW YEAR: SIMPLEX 
mechanism rebuilt, $135.00, complete, $175.«); Peerless 
low intensity, $110.00: Powers mechanism rebuilt, 
$40.00; complete 6-B, $85.00; 15 ampere rectifiers, with 
rectifier bulbs, $35.00. Bargains in sanitary supplies; 
machine parts, all theatre accessories always on hand. 
Get our prices. Tell us your troubles. CROWN 
MOTION PICTURE SUPPLIES, 311 W. 44th St., 
New York City. 



UNUSUAL BARGAINS IN USED OPERA 
Chairs, Sound Equipment, Moving Picture Machines, 
Screens, Spotlights, Stereopticons, etc. Projection 
Machines Repaired. Send for catalogue H. MOVIE 
SUPPLY COMPANY, 844 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



TWO REBUILT SIMPLEX MACHINES COM- 
plete; look and will work like new. for $400.00. BOX 
334, MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 



FOR SALE: DICTAPHONE COMPLETE WITH 
dictating and transcribing machines. Also shaving 
machine. Price $350. Perfect working condition. 
Write BOX 138, MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
1790 Broadway, New York City. 



PI^INTINe SERVICE 



THEATRICAL PRINTING A SPECIALTY. STA- 
tionery and advertising circulars. Fine work at low 
cost. BOX nOA, MOTION PICTURE HERALD, 
1790 Broadway, New York City. 



TI^AILEI^S 



SOUND TRAILERS— YOUR COPY, 8c FT. NO 
charge for cards. Advance strips, 65c. MISSOURI 
FILM LABORATORIES, 1704 Baltimore, Kansas City, 
Mo. 



GENEI^AL ECUIPMENT 



TRUST BUSTING PRICES ON QUALITY SOUND 
Equipment— S.O.S. Brings 'Em Down— $179.70 Does 
It — Bausch Lomb Cinephor Optical Systems; RCA 
type Sprockets; W. E. type Soundgates; G. E. Exciter 
Lamps; Genuine RCA Photocells. U. S. Government 
Specifications. Install and service yourself. Dealers 
Protected. S.O.S. CORP., 1600 Broadway. Cable: 
"Sosound," New York. 



HERE'S TO YOU: A VERY BRIGHT AND 
Happy New Year: 'B' battery eliminator guaranteed 
noiseless, $15.50; Western Electric speaker unit, $25.00; 
Photo cells Western Electric, $7.50, RCA $5.00; 
complete equipments at very cheap prices. CROWN 
MOTION PICTURE SUPPLIES, 311 West 44th St., 
New York City. 



HIGH GRADE LENSES AT A REAL BARGAIN. 
BOX 245, MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 



NEW ECUIPMENT 



NEW YEAR BRINGS NEW DEAI^REAL QUAL- 
ity Prices Never Lower— S.O.S. Leads— 15" Film Cabi- 
nets, $1.95 section; Simplex Magazines, $15.95; Simplex 
Lenses, $6.75; Folding Microscopes, 89c; Simplex 
Eyeshields, $2.62; Microphones, $1.18 up; Steel Curtain 
Track, $1.69 ft.; Synchronous Motors, $12.95; Acous- 
tical Felt, 22^c sq. yd.; RCA Professional Projectors, 
$395.00; Portable Soundfilm Projectors complete, $2.95; 
Beaded Soundscreens, 29c ft. ; Catalog mailed. Dealers 
protected. S.O.S. CORP., 1600 Broadway, New York. 



TI^AINING SCIiCCLS 



LEARN MODERN THEATRE MANAGEMENT. 
Approved home-study training in Theatre Manage- 
ment, Advertising and Technics. Send for catalog. 
THEATRE MANAGERS INSTITUTE, 315 Washing- 
ton St.. Elmira. New York. 



BUSINESS 
$TIMIILAT€R$ 



SEND ONE DOLLAR FOR BRAND NEW 
business getter. Original tried and proven in my own 
theatre. No contest, prizes or catch. FRED H. 
STROM, Lyra Theatre, Minneapolis, Minn. 



KEEP YOUR THEATRE OPEN. WRITE FOR 
information. PRINCESS THEATRE, Guttenberg, 
Iowa. 



EILMS 



SILENT PICTURES, WESTERNS, MELODRA- 
mas, Comedies, Serials — Prints in good condition — 
reasonable rentals— INDEPENDENT FILM CO., Film 
Bldg., Omaha, Nebr. 



E)€$ITICNS WANTEO 



EXPERIENCED MANAGER, PUBLICITY AND 
exploitation. Handle any work connected with thea- 
tre. References. Salary or percentage. BOX 256, 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 



TWO PROJECTIONISTS EXPERIENCED ON 
Western Electric and other sound equipments. Ref- 
erences. BOX 257, MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 



THEATRES WANTED 



TO RENT OR BUY, "THEATRE IN CITY OF 
10,000 or over. Must be doing nice business and bear 
closest investigation. Prefer North or South Carolina 
or South. BOX 249, MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 



TO RENT OR LEASE FOR SUMMER STOCK. 
Small theatre now closed in town with no competition. 
Must be close to New York City. Small auditorium 
preferred. State all in first letter. BOX 113A, 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 1790 Broadway. New 
York City. 



TECHNICAL BCCrS 



BY POPULAR REQUEST— S'HLL MORE AVAIL- 
able — Prices Cut. "Sound Projection," "Servicing 
Projection Equipment," "Simplified Servicing of Sound 
Equipment"; last two just off press. All three, $15.00 
value, $3.95. Individually, $1.50. S.O.S CORP, 1600 
Broadway, New York. 



"RICHARDSON'S HAND BOOKS OF PROJEC- 
tion" in three volumes. Universally accredited as the 
best and most practical. Aaron Nadell's "Projection 
Sound Pictures." Complete information on sound 
equipment. Both text books complete for $12.80. 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD BOOKSHOP. 1790 
Broadway, New York City. 



WANTED TC DDT 



CASH FOR SIMPLEX MACHINES, STRONG. 
Peerless or any make low intensity lamps. BOX 333. 
MOTION PICTURE HERALD. 



THREE HUNDRED SECOND-HAND THEATRE 
chairs wanted. Must be in good condition and 
comfortable style. Price must be very low. Will 
pay cash if suitable. BOX 119A, MOTION PICTURE 
HERALD. 



SIMPLEX PICTURE MACHINE WANTED. AD- 
dress LLOYD BRIDGHAM, Dover, N. H. 



o CAN GAUGE 

ITS TOTAL VALUE? 

EASTMAN Super-sensitive Panchromatic 
Negative has helped the motion picture in- 
dustry to attain improved working condi- 
tions ... lov^er Hghting costs... finer photog- 
raphy . . . better prints . . . higher screen quaUty. 

Who can gauge the total value of this 
film's contribution? Without the qualities 
which it offered, the industry would have 
missed some of the most important stimuli 
it has ever received. 

Further improved since its introduc- 
tion, Eastman Super-sensitive is rendering 
its greatest service in the gray-backed form 
in which it is now available. Eastman Kodak 
Company (J. E. Brulatour, Inc., Distributors, 
New York, Chicago, Hollywood). 

EASTMAN SUPER-SENSITIVE 

PANCHROMATIC NEGATIVE (gray-backed) 




normal wcr 



FflREWEl 
TO ARMS 

(By ERNEST HEMINGWAY 

. JELEN HAYES 

GARY COOPER 
ADOLPHE MENJOU 

DIRECTED BY FRANK BORZAGE 

(2 paramount Qicture 



. . . : . TRiPLINGi 
NORMAL GROSSEil 
AT ALL POlMTf! 



GO 



J>ird weei ea„; 





CAPITOL - WILKES BARRE 

receipts for £our days $1200 
over average week's business. 



« week's I. • J^ENTUCKY 

— ?:!f^Ll^"»e*« in £o„r days. 



CO 



PARAMOUNT - OMAHA 

i^^est business of the year 





i HOLDOVER BUflNE 
ANDABJOLUTi 
aPAOTY EYERYWHER 



Mi 

il 



MOTION PICTURE 





A CONSOLIDATION OF EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD AND MOTION PICTLIRE NEWS 




STATIC in 
RADIO CITY 




PLANNED 

PROCEDURE 
for INDUSTRY 



jin Two Sections — Section One 



Vol 110 T\Ir» Q Entered as second-class matter, January 12, 1931. at the Post Office, at New York, N. Y,, under the act of March 3, 1879. P«b- T.iniio».» 1 1 (i 
,|» wi. J.XU, i-^u. O lished Weekly by Quigley Publishing Co., Inc., at 1790 Broadway, New York. Subscription, $3.00 a year. Single copies, 25 cents. January 14. I 



TONIGHT, AND ANY NIGHT, IS YOURS FOR 
PROFIT WITH "TONIGHT IS OURS''. . . 





KING OF ACTORS! 
QUEEN OF CHARM! 






CLaudette 

COLBERT 

(Fredrlc 

MAR.CH 

in NOEL COWARD'S 

TONIGHT 
IS OU RS 

^ti^AlHOH 5KIPW0RTH 

ARTHUR. BYRON 

(2 Qaramount picture 



A 



GREAT NEWS 

for the entire motion 
picture industry! 





starting 1933 
with a great 
big smile! 




AVAILABLE NOW FROM WARNER BROi 




THE INTIMATE DIARY OF THE ''MAYO 

VITAGRAPH, INC.. DISTRIBUTORS 




lamou* I"" * _ 



..NOW WE RE TELLING YOU! 

nothing but the cold, scientific box-office facts about "20,000- Years in Sing 
Sing." We don't have to rave when black-and-white figures shout! We knew 
we'd have to prove that this is an even greater audience picture than "Fugitive" 
or "Silver Dollar". . . Now here's laboratory evidence that "20,000 Years" has 
everything it takes to take top money out of your town! 



CONGRATULATIONS, 

WARDEN LAWES! 

You've started another 

HONOR SYSTEM all 
America will endorse: 

HONORS FOR YOUR STORY- 

"Great! Enthralling entertainment. A 
splendid writing job."— iV. Y. Mirror 

HONORS ''OR THE FILM- 

"Fast . . . amusing. If you like excite- 
ment and thrills you'll like this film." 
—N. Y. Telegraph 

HONORS FOR THE CAST- 

"Superb characterization by Spencer 
Tracy. As compelling and dynamic a 
performance as the screen has seen." 
—N. Y. American 

HONORS FOR CURTIZ- 

"Thoroughly punch-packed. Direc- 
ted with forcefulness, thrill, and 
understanding by Michael Curtiz." — 
N. Y. News 



OR SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS ONi-Y 





)F HELL^'-by WARDEN LEWIS E. LAWES 




JAN 14 1933 < 




MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



Vol. 110, No. 3 



OP 



January 14, 1933 



A HOLLYWOOD CONQUEST 

THE casting of "Cavalcade," reviewed elsewhere in this 
issue, by reason of several aspects of its excellence is a 
proper subject for special and separate consideration. 
The principles applied so effectively, in the light of much 
current Hollywood practise, seem somewhat akin to revolution. 

Outstandingly evident is the successful determination of 
Mr. Winfield Sheehan, who can at times be most determined, 
to make "Cavalcade," and nothing else. No player, and the 
piece has a very large cast of exceptionally able persons, was 
permitted in the least instance to dominate his part. For 
once in the history of the screen, actors have been strictly 
required to be actors, to play their parts as individuals in 
the story created by the author. "Cavalcade" was written by 
Mr. Noel Coward for the purpose of the limning of a certain 
set of facts and state of civilization in various hysterical 
processes of reaction and change. It was not written to wrap 
around the toothsome anatomy of any screen beauty, nor 
for the exploitation and aggrandizement of any name of stage 
or screen. It was written to tell a story and. In spite of all 
the personality traditions of the great personality chessboard 
and market of Hollywood, no one has been permitted to in- 
vade the narrative design. 

The astonishingly effective restraints of "Cavalcade" against 
the many, many ways in which great material so often "goes 
movie" are many, but the greatest of them all Is subordina- 
tion of the players to their roles. No exception Is fairly to 
be taken to any player's work In the piece, but since we are 
talking of roles, the performance of Una O'Connor, who 
played her part of "Ellen Bridges," the maid, In the stage 
company In London, is worthy of a special note. And Diana 
Wynyard, who plays "Jane Marryot," would be the star of 
the show If It could be a starring play. Miss Wynyard came 
over from London last year In the stage play "Lean Harvest" 
and acquired a picture engagement with MSM, but the only 
previous screen glimpse we have had of her was In the role 
of the "Princess Natasha" in "Rasputin." Now she is likely 
to be seen and heard more and oftener. 

AAA 
"WINDOW OF THE WORLD" 

THERE have been considerable gusts of publicity of late, 
for what purpose does not appear. In behalf of the fame 
of General John Vicente Gomez, president of Venezuela, 
the genial and courtly dictator of that sector of sunshine for 
the last quarter of a century. And now, so we are gravely 
told, he sees an American film drama every night at one of 
his two palaces, for the purpose of keeping advised of the 
trend of affairs In this northern world. If he gets confused 
he can be forgiven. 



THE CREAM OF THE SHOW 



B 

oTth 



ROADWAY being also quite considerably the street of 
the car salesrooms, and this being also the week of the 
Automobile Show, we find justification in the citation 
of the enthusiasm of the current motor selling season as both 
a demonstration of and a challenge to showmanship. If the 
oceans of advertising and rivers of publicity are credible, 
the new motor merchandise is made almost entirely of sell- 
ing points, which means showmanship expressed In terms of 
gadgets. Motors are used to ride in but they are being built 
to do tricks while you look at them. That's an idea for the 
motion picture, which is used for nothing but to be looked at. 

As might have been expected after his recent splash on 
the printed pages and across the radio map, Mr. Walter P. 
Chrysler seems to be the prima donna of the auto show. 
Some conniving publicity person pertaining to his organiza- 
tion conceived the idea of an exhibit of cars all done in 
chromium plate and cream enamels, with a cream colored 
carpet and salesmen to talk and demonstrate In cream colored 
suits and ravishing girl models to pose in the cars all be- 
gowned In cream. The color scheme proved charming, almost 
modest, but when the newspaper advertisements erupted 
crediting Mr. Chrysler with "the cream of the show," noth- 
ing could be done about it under the "fair practices" clau-se 
of the code. He has the cream to prove It. 

AAA 

WHAT with the international debt situation, the 
Radio City Music Hall and apathy In Wall Street, 
the New Year started off not too well. But now 
the first of the seed catalogues have arrived and the green 
tip of one daring hyacinth has appeared on the sunny side 
of our Connecticut rockery. Life resumes meaning, and pres- 
ently it will be spring again. ■ 

AAA 

CIGARETTE CAMPAIGN 

A DRIVE Is on, and the tobacco trade press is all 
a-twitter, because of the decision of the management 
at the Radio City Music Hall and the RKO Roxy the- 
atre to permit smoking in the mezzanines — which in this case 
means balconies about two whoops and a holler from the 
stage and screen. The United States Tobacco Journal sug- 
gests that certain trade leaders "act jointly in forcing upon 
the operators of competitive New York houses recognition 
of Roxy's aggressive policy. Then let trade leaders take sim- 
ilar action In every other community throughout the country." 
It might be just as well for the tobacco interests to let the 
motion picture exhibitor run his own policy. No general prin- 
ciple is Involved. Broadway Is not Main Street. 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD MARTIN QUIGLEY. Edi+or-in-Chief and Publisher 

Incorporating Exhibitor's Herald, founded 1915; Motion Picture News, founded 1913; Moving Picture World, founded 1907; Motography, founded 1909; The Filnn 
Index, founded 1906. Published _ every Thursday by Quigley Publishing Company, 1790 Broadway, New York City. Telephone Circle 7-3100. Martin Quigley, Editor-in-Chief 
and Publisher; Colvin Brown, Vice-President and General Manager; Terry Rannsaye, Editor; Ernest A. Rovelstad, Managing Editor; Chicago office, 407 South Dearborn 
street, Edwin S. Clifford, manager, Hollywood office, Pacific States Life Building, Leo Meehan, manager; London office, 41 Redhill Drive, Edgware, London, England, 
W. H. Mooring, representative; Berlin office, Katharinstrasse 3, Berlin-Halinsee, Germany, Hans Tintner, representative; Paris office, 19, Rue de la Cour-des-Noues, Paris 20e, 
France, Pierre Autre, representative; Sydney _ office, 102 Sussex street, Sydney, Australia, Cliff Holt, representative; Mexico City office, James Lockhart, Apartado 269, Mexico 
City, Mexico. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations.^ All contents copyright 1933 by Quigley Publishing Company. All correspondence should be addressed to the New 
York Office. Better Theatres, devoted to the construction, equipment and operation of theatres, is published every fourth week as section 2 of Motion Picture Herald. Other 
Quigley Publications: Motion Picture Daily, The Hollywood Herald, The Motion Picture Almanac, published annually, and the Chicagoan. 



PLANNED PROCEDURE 
FOR INDUSTRY 

_____ ^ py^QpQ^^l fQ organize business 

to escape past errors and 
to realize future possibilities 



^ HE motion picture industry while 
partaking of the effects of the world de- 
pression finds, in addition, upon its own 
doorstep at the opening of the New Year 
a variety of problems which cry insistently 
for attention. 

It is of course true that a considerable 
number of the adverse conditions which 
now affect the industry are directly trace- 
able to the disruption of the normal proc- 
esses in commerce and industry. Various 
of the causes of the curtailment which has 
taken place in theatre attendance have 
been and are beyond the control of the 
industry. The shrinking of the public's purse, 
due to unemployment, has reduced both 
the actual number of theatre patrons and 
also the potential number of patrons to 
whom the motion picture might appeal. A 
vast number of people have simply been 
without the means for regular theatre at- 
tendance, irrespective of how great may 
have been the attraction. 

BUT IT IS equally true that the Industry 
itself and singly is accountable for several 
of the adverse conditions which now ob- 
tain. It is to these that the business of 
motion pictures might well address serious 
thought at the opening of this New Year. 

It was perhaps Inevitable that the In- 
dustry in its principal departments should 
have partaken in some degree of the ex- 
cesses which characterized the inflationary 
period In American business which drew 
to an end in the Autumn of 1929. The 
spirit of unbridled expansion of those days 
led to developments in the theatre field 
which cannot now escape such revision as 
may be necessary to adapt them to the 
conditions which we now face and to those 
conditions discernible for the near future 
which do not appear to make practicable 
the original concept of various of these 
developments. An early application of ap- 
propriate remedies In this connection will 
be both wise and salutary. 

It Is not yet apparent that the produc- 
tion branch of the Industry has succeeded 
In gearing itself to the new requirements 
of the day nor has it yet been made plain 
that production has commenced to apply 
In the expected degree the lessons which 
are to be gained out of its considerable 
store of accumulated experience. Holly- 



by MARTIN QUIGLEY 

wood has not been adequately responsive 
to the developments that have been tak- 
ing place generally in the fields of finance, 
commerce and industry. Seemingly it has 
held itself to be in a measure Insulated 
against the repercussions of the new order 
which -of course is only a fancied position 
unrelated to and unsupported by reality. 
In those respects in which Hollywood has 
persisted in a reactionary attitude it must 
presently yield for its own good and for 
the good of the whole Industry. 

The dominant satisfaction which the in- 
dustry may properly entertain as it enters 
upon the New Year is the fact that there 
is no evidence whatsoever to support any 
suspicion which may anywhere exist that 
motion picture entertainment does not con- 
tinue to hold preeminent position in the 
affections of the public. It has no rival 
as the people's principal form of public 
amusement. Its prestige and appeal re- 
main unchallenged.' Now as the most 
graphic of the arts, equipped to tell its 
stories both in image and In sound, it is 
destined to soar to heights which in face 
of the present moments of uncertainty 
may appear almost fantastic. 

But if the challenge of present condi- 
tions, as well as those of the immediate 
future, is to be met successfully the indus- 
try stands in pressing need of a program 
of planned operations — a scheme not es- 
sentially unlike that,;which for productive 
industry generally has' received high spon- 
sorship. 

INDUSTRY, broadly speaking, now faces 
the prospect of a narrowed margin of 
profit on its operations, and this only in 
the more favored individual instances for 
the present at least. To insure even this 
narrowed margin, united action on the 
part of all principal interests Is necessary. 
There Is need for much reordering and re- 
arranging. Those conditions which once 
allowed an Income sufficient to absorb the 
cost of inefficiency, waste and vanity com- 
petition are not likely to return soon if 
ever. Solving the problems of the day 
and preparing to meet those of tomorrow 
should not be left to haphazard procedure. 
There should be Introduced carefully 
planned and carefully ordered arrange- 
ments conceived out of the accumulated 



knowledge and experience and executed 
with determination and dispatch. 

The motion picture industry provides a 
fruitful field for the introduction of a pro- 
gram of planned operations. A consider- 
able list of things that obviously and un- 
questionably should be done might easily 
be compiled. All that is necessary is a 
plan energized with a wholesome spirit of 
industry cooperation, together with the de- 
termination that the industry shall speedily 
put its house In order to the end of realiz- 
ing those vast potentialities of profit for 
the business, and service to the public, 
which are inherent in the talking motion 
picture. 

THE MOTION PICTURE business is unique 
in many respects. It is engaged in the 
extraordinary trade of merchandising to 
the public a product intended to convey 
emotional stimuli. In the fulfillment of this 
mission it stands in a position of grave re- 
sponsibility to the public welfare. There 
necessarily must be an intimate relation- 
ship between the prosperity of the industry 
and the degree In which it discharges this 
responsibility. The principal business of 
the industry is to cater to the public taste. 
In all of Its expressions in which it seeks to 
cultivate the public taste, rather than cater 
to established tastes, it must for Its own 
and the public's welfare look upwards and 
not downwards. In order that this may 
more uniformly and more definitely be.ac- 
compllshed there should be formulated j&n 
appropriate policy and when the policyjjis 
arrived at, through planned procedure, it 
should be maintained. 

There are also other corrective measures 
which should be introduced, as both an 
armor of defense and a sword of progress. 
Many of these have as their needed ob- 
jective that attribute of character which is 
essential to the successful conduct of im- 
portant-business the world over. 

The motion picture and the industry be- 
hind it stand in the white glare of pitiless 
publicity. It has sought and obtained this 
position and it Is proper and necessary 
that It should be there. But the position 
entails responsibilities that cannot be evad- 
ed. The business of motion pictures is one 
that stands eminently in need of great 

(Continued on page 12) 



[8] 



January 14, 19 3 3 MOTION PICTURE HERALD 9 



HERTZ RESIGNS; SCHAEFER, DEMBOW 
AND COKELL ON PARAMOUNT BOARD 



Zukor Denounces "Malicious 
Rumor" That Emanuel Cohen 
Is Leaving Paramount; Lauds 
Company's Current Product 

Resignation of John Hertz last Friday as 
chairman of the finance committee of Para- 
mount Publix Corporation and his with- 
drawal from the company, after, as he an- 
nounced, a difference with President Adolph 
Zukor as to his authority, was followed this 
week by election to the board of directors 
of George J. Schaefer, Sam Dembow, Jr., 
and Walter B. Cokell, all of whom have 
been with the organization at least ten 
years. All three were appointed to the ex- 
ecutive committee and Mr. Cokell also was 
appointed an assistant treasurer. 

At the same time came announcement 
from Mr. Zukor that "there is absolutely 
no truth in the malicious rumor that Eman- 
uel Cohen, vice-president in charge of pro- 
duction, is leaving Paramount." Mr. Cohen 
was suddenly summoned to New York last 
week. Mr. Zukor added: "He is returning 
in a few days to the Coast to continue the 
fine job he has been doing in organizing 
and running our studio, which is now mak- 
ing what I think are the best pictures this 
company has ever had. He has the full 
confidence and support of all the executives 
and the board of directors of the company." 

Following the resignation of Mr. Hertz, 
it was said at Paramount that no call had 
been announced as yet for a meeting of 
the finance committee to name his successor. 

Joined in November, 1931 

News of the withdrawal of the finance 
chairman came with this announcement 
from Mr. Hertz: 

"In November, 1931, at the suggestion of 
Kuhn, Loeb & Co., and at the request of the 
president and board of directors of Paramount, 
I became a member of the board of directors 
of the company, and chairman of the finance 
committee. Since that time I have been active 
in the management of the affairs of the corpo- 
ration, devoting my entire time thereto. 

"Whatever I have been able to accomplish 
in the company's affairs has been accomplished 
because I had the cooperation of all the offi- 
cers and the organization, without any question 
as to the technical limitations upon the author- 
ity of various officers. Within the last week 
a question has been raised by the president 
as to the authority of the chairman of the 
finance committee to continue to function as 
he had up to that time. I felt that I could not 
accomplish the purposes for which I came 
to the company unless I was permitted to 
so function, and therefore there was no alterna- 
tive for me but to tender my resignation, which 
I have done. 

"In severing my connection with Paramount, 
I want to express my deep appreciation for the 
splendid cooperation and support I have re- 
ceived from the company's bank creditors, Kuhn, 
Loeb & Co., as well as the officers, directors, 
and employees of the organization." 

The following statement was issued by 
Paramount : 

"During his fourteen months as chairman of 
the finance committee of Paramount Publix 
Corporation Mr. Hertz has accomplished much 
in the handling of the corporation's financial 



problem. The president and all the directors 
greatly regret that he now finds himself unable 
to continue to serve the corporation in that 
capacity." 

From Sir William Wiseman, vice-chair- 
man of the finance committee and member 
of Kuhn, Loeb & Co., bankers, came this 
announcement : 

"In November, 1931, we suggested to the 
president of the Paramount Publix Corpora- 
tion that John Hertz should be invited to be- 
come a director and the chairman of the finance 
committee. The president of the corporation, 
Adolph Zukor, and the board of directors, unan- 
imously invited Mr. Hertz to fill these posi- 
tions, and he has since devoted his time and 
energy exclusively to the affairs of the corpo- 
ration, and, in spite of diiiRcult times, has been 
able to establish important economies and ad- 
ministrative reforms. 

"We greatly regret that, Mr. Hertz now finds 
himself unable to continue to serve the corpora- 
tion. His wide experience and grasp of finan- 
cial and administrative problems have been of 
the greatest value to the corporation." 

The past year has seen readjustments in 
Paramount's economic structure which have 
resulted in savings totaling millions. Future 
commitments, which include serial payments 
on investments, purchase-money notes, real 
estate mortgages and bond maturities, will 
this year be 50 per cent less than in 1932, 
while in 1934 they will be reduced another 
30 per cent, or to 20 per cent of the total 
1932 commitments. 

Throughout the year cash income was 



^ ^ ^ 

This IVeek 



Page 8 
Page 1 I 

Page 9 



Planned Procedure for Industry — by Mar- 
tin Quigley 
Static in Radio City — by Terry Ramsaye 
Hertz resigns; Schaefer, Dembow and 
Cokell on Paramount board 

Revised amortization vital in gauging 

actual current income Page 10 

"Cavalcade" — as seen by Terry Ramsaye Page 16 
Music Hall starts combination policy as 

RKO Roxy continues operation Page 25 

FEATURES 

Editorial Page 7 

The Camera Reports Page 13 

Asides and Interludes Page 27 

J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum Page 40 

DEPARTMENTS 

Box Office Receipts Page 34 

Showmen's Reviews ,■ Page 30 

Managers Round Table Page 49 

Short Features Page 48 

Technological Page 67 

Chicago Page 48 

The Release Chart ■ Page 61 

What the Picture Did for M'e Page 42 

Classified Advertising Page 68 



Withdrawal of Finance Chair- 
man from Company After 14 
Months Follows Difference 
With Zukor Over Authority 

slightly greater than operating disburse- 
ments. Negative costs were reduced on an 
average of 31 per cent a picture. General 
cash disbursements were $39,685,000 lower 
in the first 48 weeks of 1932 than in the 
corresponding period in 1931. Rental re- 
ductions effected by a revaluation of the- 
atre leases totaled $3,600,000 and adjusted 
foreign leases saved another $243,000. As 
a result, real estate taxes were reduced 
$173,196 and insurance charges $270,000, 
with $325,000 in insurance charges estimated 
for the full year. Payroll reductions in the 
last 16 months now represent weekly sav- 
ings of $186,000, equal to $6,000,000 for 
1932 and an estimated $10,000,000 for 1933. 
Realty savings in the year totaled $7,000,- 
000. Additional details of these economies 
appeared in the Herald issue of Decem- 
ber 24. 

Came In With Lasker, Wrigley 

When Mr. Hertz entered Pararporint 14 
months ago, he, was accompanied, by Albert 
D. Lasker and the late Williarh Wrigley, 
Jr., both of whom also became members 
of the board of directors. 

Mr. Hertz was founder and chairman of 
Yellow. Cab Company of Chicago and of 
Yellow Truck and Coach Corporation and 
head of the Fifth Avenue Coach Company 
in New York, as well as a director of the 
First National Bank of Chicago. He is the 
dominant factor in the Thompson restaurant 
chain of Chicago. 

The executive committee of the Para- 
mount board of directors now consists of 
Mr. Zukor, Ralph A. Kohn, Emanuel 
Cohen, Messrs. Schaefer, Dembow and Co- 
kell, with Austin C. Keough and EmiJ 
Shauer as alternates. 

Mr. Schaefer, vice-president of Para- 
mount Pictures Distributing Corporation, 
has been with the company since 1920. Mr. 
Dembow, executive vice-president of Publix 
Theatres Corporation, in charge of all the- 
atres, joined the organization in 1923, and 
Mr. Cokell in May, 1920, in charge of the 
budget and statistical departments. A year 
ago_ Mr. Cokell became assistant to the 
chairman of the finance committee. 

The past year has seen a rapid succession 
of changes in executive personnel in Para- 
mount, climaxed October 29 by the resig-' 
nation of Sam Katz, who opposed the decen- 
tralization policy then under way. It was 
in January, 1932, that Sidney R. Kent left 
the company. Then in April Jesse L. Lasky,. 
vice-president in charge of production, was 
requested to take a three months' leave, and 
later he was succeeded by Emanuel Cohen. 
Resignations in the following months in- 
cluded those of B. P. Schulberg, managing 
director of production ; Herman Wobber, 
John D. Clark, Charles E. McCarthy, Harry 
Ballance and a number of others in lesser 
capacities. 



10 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14, 1933 



REVISED AMORTIZATION VITAL IN 
GAUGING ACTUAL CURRENT INCOME 



Wall Street Journal Says Many 
Problems Rennain To Be 
Solved; Declares Improved 
Picture Quality Should Help 

The important strides which motion pic- 
ture companies have made in recent months 
in "putting their houses in order," and in 
reconditioning their economic structures on 
a sounder basis, are recognized by Wall 
Street's conservative Wall Street Journal, 
of Dow, Jones. It was pointed out, how- 
ever, that "many problems remain to be 
solved, with public spending still subnormal 
and a trend toward lower admission prices 
in evidence. One of the most important 
achievements of the year has been establish- 
ment of new and more drastic scales of film 
amortization, in line with current condi- 
tions in the industry." 

An optimistic note was sounded regard- 
ing the improvement in picture quality in 
recent months. This improvement should 
react favorably on income, it was said. 
"The moving picture industry, having 
passed through the most difficult year in 
its history, is looking forward to another 
year of readjustment and retrenchment in 
which the results of the work already ac- 
complished should begin to take effect. 
However, the problem of budgeting expenses 
to meet a continued decline in income is 
still present." 

Evidently, Wall Street has taken full 
cognizance of the fact that the industry 
made quite some progress in the past twelve- 
month in adjusting operating conditions by 
reducing office overhead and executive ex- 
pense ; lowering negative costs due to studio 
economies and to a better scheduling of pic- 
tures "which saves waste of time by high- 
priced actors." Theatre decentralization, 
which reduced home office expense, and the 
setting up of new and more drastic policies 
of film amortization in line with the new 
scale of income were said to have helped 
the general situation. 

The revised amortization program, while 
obviously neither an economy nor a cause 
of lower earnings, was said to be of pri- 
mary importance in showing film companies 
and their stockholders what their actual 
profits are under current income. Previ- 
ously, the rate of charging ofif films was of 
necessity based on tables of experience, and 
obviously a marked decline in the available 
income of the industry made it necessary 
to change the rate at which amortization of- 
film costs is written off. In this connec- 
tion, the Wall Street Journal said: 

"Silent films had a certain well established 
average life on which tables of amortization 
were based. Sound films, which cost more on 
the average, and at first earned much more 
than silent films, later turned out to have a 
shorter life — that is, a greater part of their 
total rentals were received in the first few 
months of release. This obviously meant that 
a larger portion of the cost had to be charged 
off in the early weeks of release. In the last 
year the sharp decline in box office attendance 
and available income required another and 
more drastic revision in amortization rates. 
The erection of de luxe houses all over the 
country in the last few years, the more rapid 
release of films in territories outside the big 



cities and the general trend toward a more rapid 
turnover of films are additional factors in the 
changing conditions. 

"Paramount-Publix Corp. has set up a new 
scale of film amortization which at present is 
the most drastic followed by any company in 
the industry, since it charges oif 50 per cent 
of the cost of films in the first six weeks of 
release and 95.9 per cent of cost in the first 26 
weeks. This scale is applied to the 90 per cent 
of negative and positive film costs allocated 
to domestic business, the remaining 10 per cent 
being allocated to foreign business and amor- 
tized under a separate scale. 

"The following table of Paramount's present 
amortization shows cumulative portion of do- 
mestic cost written off : 

1 week 10% 9 weeks 68% 

2 weeks 19% 12 weeks 80% 

3 weeks 27% 16 weeks 89% 

4 weeks 35% 20 weeks 92.7% 

5 weeks 43% 26 weeks 95.9% 

6 weeks 50% 52 weeks 100% 

"Obviously a film is practically all written off 
within six months after release. 
"Under the old scale Paramount allocated 



RKO Honored 




The M.P.F.D.A gives an award 
each year to that motion picture 
exchange in the United States which 
has the best fire prevention record. 
At the headquarters of the M.P.P.D.A. 
on Tuesday, this trophy was presented 
by Will H. Hays to RKO for 1932, 
and received by Ned Depinet, vice- 
president in charge of distribution for 
RKO, who accepted it on behalf of 
Jack Osserman, the RKO Chicago 
branch manager, and the entire per- 
sonnel of his office. The Chicago fire 
warden and the Fire Prevention Com- 
mittee, who made the inspection, 
rated this exchange 100 per cent plus 
for the entire year. 



Contrasts New and Old Scales 
of Leading Companies; Cites 
Operating Adjustments and 
Lower Costs for Negatives 

85 per cent of film costs to the United States 
and 15 per cent to foreign business. Of the 
85 per cent, 70 per cent to 75 per cent was 
written off in the first three months (12 weeks) 
and the remainder within a year. Foreign films 
allocation was written off in^ two years. 

"The following table shows the new amorti- 
zation scale of Warner Bros, on negative costs 
compared with the old rate: 

New rate Old rate 



13 weeks 511^% 42^^% 

26 weeks 73 6554 

39 weeks 8454 79J4 

52 weeks 93% t&A 

65 weeks 100 93 

88 weeks 100 



"Positive cost which is only about 10 per cent 
of negative cost is written off at a slightly 
more rapid rate, 64^ per cent in 13 weeks, 90 
per cent in 26 weeks, and 100 per cent in a 
year. 

"Radio Keith Orpheum Corp.'s new scale 
and old scale of amortization compare as fol- 
lows : 

New rate Old rate 



4 weeks 17% 14% 

13 weeks 55i/2 

24 weeks 73% 10H 

26 weeks 75}4 

36 weeks 865^ 87^^ 

52 weeks 95 95% 

78 weeks 100 



"Positives are written off on about the same 
scale as Warner Bros. 

"Fox Film Corp., in amortizing its features 
negative costs, formerly charged off 50 per 
cent of gross domestic rentals on each picture 
weekly for 52 weeks with tKe deficit if any 
charged off in the 52d week. This has subse- 
quently been increased to 70 per cent of rentals. 
For internal accounting purposes 1-45 of nega- 
tive cost is charged off each week for 45 weeks. 
Half of gross domestic rentals is applied to the 
67 per cent of the cost of feature pictures allo- 
cated to domestic business. The remaining 33 
per cent of cost is allocated to foreign business 
and amortized beginning with the time of for- 
eign release, under a similar scale. 

"Loew's, Inc., has recently adopted a new 
and more drastic scale of film amortization as 
stated in its annual report recently published, 
but a detailed schedule is not at present avail- 
able." 



Shubert Receivership Terminates 

Sale of Shubert Theatre Corporation 
properties will terminate the receivership, 
it was decided this week by Federal Judge 
Francis G. Caffey. Lee Shubert has been 
allowed to resign as one of the receivers 
so that he could bid on the properties. Sev- 
eral Shubert theatres in key cities through- 
out the country have been used variously for 
roadshowing of films. 



Vortlcamp Named Branch Head 

C. J. Vortkamp has been named branch 
manager at Cincinnati for Henry F. Vort- 
kamp & Co. theatrical supplies house. Vort- 
kamp's territory will include southern Ohio 
and northern Kentucky. Howard Hutchison 
will take charge of the Detroit office, cov- 
ering entire state of Michigan. 



January 14, 1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



STATIC in RADIO CITY 

Iby TERRY RAMSAYE 



F the seating capacity of the Radio City 
Music Hall is precisely 6,200, then just 
exactly 6,199 persons must have been 
aware at the initial performance that they 
were eye witnesses to something tremen- 
dously more astonishing than the opening 
of the world's biggest theatre. It was the 
unveiling of the world's best "bust." 

Carefully utilizing every imposing mod- 
ern resource from money to metallurgy, 
with the single exception of plain common 
sense, RKO and its executive control have 
attained a negative triumph beyond com- 
pare in the history of the amusement in- 
dustry. 

And such a pity that it must go into the 
pages of amusement history. What has 
occurred and is occurring at the Radio 
City Music Hall and its lesser neighbor, 
the RKO Roxy motion picture theatre, in- 
evitably will be accredited to the motion 
picture industry, with which it is, in an 
accurate sense, scarcely related. 

Before this the motion picture industry 
had full and plenty of the problems com- 
mon to American industry, plus some in- 
ternal problems of its own. The RKO mis- 
adventure at Radio City is likely to leave 
its unhappy impress on screen destiny for 
decades, and yet it is in truth an external 
matter, the magnificently spectacular cul- 
mination of an ill-conducted invasion. 

THE RADIO CITY THEATRE SITUATION 
with all of its implications and involve- 
ments is merely the currently conspicuous 
and overwhelming component of a some- 
what larger picture in which are innumer- 
able detailed bits quite as choice if not 
so large. The Radio Corporation of Amer- 
ica came into this industry seeking to real- 
ize upon the possession of a new kit of 
tools, the sound element of the talking pic- 
ture, somewhat as a sequel to the rise of 
radio and the National Broadcasting Com- 
pany, which was built on kindred tools, 
vacuum tubes and microphones. The Na- 
tional Broadcasting Company grew up 
without a background of precedent in the 
new art and little that resembled effective 
competition. The motion picture industry, 
however, had been evolving and building 
importantly since the nickelodeon dawn of 
1905. It had achieved no ultimate perfec- 
tion but it had some aspects of attainment 
and stability. 

One of the first gestures of the RCA 
institution was an occasion, which achieved 
no public exposition, when the declaration 
was made that the corporation would en- 
gage in the large scale production and 
merchandising of home-sound-movies re- 
gardless of what might happen to the ex- 
isting theatre-marketed industry. Peace 
was made and the project for home-sound- 



movies took care of itself. Executive con- 
trol of RKO was installed in a personage 
who stood as alone as Napoleon at Elba 
in his Broadway office, but otherwise went 
rather Hollywood. Further avowal of what 
might loosely be called policy came with 
sympathy, support and a transient partner- 
ship with a project which envisioned super- 
imposition upon an already amply seated 
theatre machine of a nationwide, mayhap 
world wide, chain of chromium plated, 
coin-in-the-slot, grandiose store shows. A 
little more than a year ago the mighty of 
RCA foresaw Trans-Lux transforming the 
motion picture map and sweeping before 
it the whole existing theatre plant. That 
seems to have taken care of itself, quite. 

But back then while the Trans-Lux turn- 
stiles were just beginning to click in a 
promised crescendo of national triumph for 
the reinstated store-show, the little theatre, 
the engineers were making the drawings 
for the biggest theatres, while steam shov- 
els ripped into the heart of Manhattan to 
make way for them. Both ends were being 
played against the middle, against the 
normal evolutions of a quarter of a century 
of screen theatres. Now that has taken 
care of itself, too — but at what cost. 

TO THOSE WHOSE REFLECTIONS AT 
this point turn toward Mr. Samuel L. Roth- 
afel, the picture showman whose name and 
impulses, not to say inspirations, are so in- 
volved in the project, it may be observed 
that his very fame itself might well have 
been expected to protect him from the 
opportunity to dream in brick and stone 
and steel so expansively. It may be re- 
marked in analogy that in the motor car 
world there are great names on the track 
and road like Dario Resta, Ralph DePalma 
and "Cannon Ball" Baker, but Kettering, 
Ford and Chrysler are not known at any 
time to have considered turning the motor 
car industry over to any of them. 

There is enough of the RKO-Radio City 
situation so that any number of executives 
might have a share of the abundant 
wreaths of wild raspberry, and they are 
well won, but it would seem that Mr. Mer- 
lin H. Aylesworth is to be found occupy- 
ing the best seat in the front row. 

Something like a year ago Mr. Ayles- 
worth became the executive chief of the 
RKO project. It was a move of consider- 
able presumption, by all who ordained it, 
this bicycling of a president between Na- 
tional Broadcasting Company and RKO 
with its very considerable job of heading 
the array of production, distribution and 
exhibition activities. Mr. Aylesworth's part 
time job already had been proved some- 
thing more than a full time job for his 
predecessor. Mr. Aylesworth's most signal 



expression as president of RKO was a 
speech made at a Motion Picture Academy 
gathering in Hollywood forecasting a state 
of bankruptcy for the industry. 

One of the few conspicuously observ- 
able and indicative decisions of his ad- 
ministration has been the recent negotia- 
tion for the continuance of a production 
administration regime which gave him "the 
bird," meaning in this instance "The Bird 
of Paradise," and "Rock-a-Bye" which was 
made twice with two costs and which 
would have to be made over again with 
a third if it were to be a motion picture 
acceptable at any box office. Incidentally 
the debacle of "Rock-a-Bye" is a consid- 
erable further invasion of the stellar status 
of Miss Constance Bennett, who very 
presently will be found depreciated as 
completely as Miss Ann Harding has been, 
by the same process. 

Miss Harding and Miss Bennett were 
two of the more important assets acquired 
by RKO from Pathe and inherited by the 
present administration of the concern. 
They were important box office personali- 
ties with large promise for development, 
considerably more important to the com- 
pany, to the exhibitor and the public, 
than the sort of stone-and-steel in which 
Mr. Aylesworth and his colleagues appear 
to have so unhappily reposed their faith. 

None of this Hollywood procedure ap- 
pears to pave the way for a brighter 
prospect for product, or for a production 
administration calculated to adjust itself 
adequately to the obvious and inevitable 
requirements of today and tomorrow. The 
intangibles of production seem ruled by 
the same strange order of fourth dimen- 
sional reasoning that has given us the 
great open places of the Radio City 
theatres. 

IT IS TRUE THAT MR. AYLESWORTH 
was invited to his seat in RKO sometime 
after the sequence of events leading up 
to where X marks the spot in Sixth avenue 
had been started. It is also true, however, 
that a year is a respectable interval of 
time in this industry, and no executive of 
RKO could have been unaware that along 
about the last week in 1932 something im- 
portant would have to occur on the two 
giant stages of the Radio City theatres. 

It has been somewhat more privately 
than publicly said that Mr. Aylesworth had 
little option about assuming the RKO pres- 
idency if he were to continue in his hap- 
pier job as president of the National 
Broadcasting Company. But, anyway, he 
did take the additional responsibility, and 
what he has done about it, and had caused 
to be done about it, is about as apparent 
as the Grand Canyon — with about the 
same cubic content of nothing. 



12 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14, 193 3: 



PROTECTION DEMANDS 
UNFAIR, SAYS HORWITZ 



Lowering Admissions Has 
Changed Situation, Declares 
Cleveland Exhibitor; Asks 
Producer Fight Twin Bill 

Reductions of admission prices have so 
changed the exhibition scene that first-run 
theatres have no justification for demanding 
the same amount of protection as heretofore 
received, says M. B. Horwitz of Cleveland, 
operating the Washington Theatre Circuit. 
The same development makes the exclusive 
run unfair and also makes unjust an insis- 
tence upon the same level of rentals from 
the indenpedent exhibitor as he paid last 
year, Mr. Horwitz declared in a letter to the 
Herald, pointing out that all these phases 
of exhibition and distribution policy are 
linked by the one fact of lowered admissions. 

Furthermore, the writer holds, the distrib- 
utor should refuse to permit the showing 
of his product on a double feature pro- 
gram, nor on any two-for-one coupon pol- 
icy, and he should insist that certain pic- 
tures in the group sold cannot be exhibited 
at an admission price of, say, less than 25 
cents in the neighborhood theatres. 
Declares Situation Changed 

Mr. Horwitz, it will be recalled, was a 
representative of the Cleveland exhibitors in 
their suit against producers and the Mo- 
tion Picture Producers and Distributors of 
America, in which the subject of zoning and 
protection played a star role. The pro- 
tracted discussions finally came to an end 
with a settlement that included a realign- 
ment of the protection program in the Cleve- 
land territory. 

"When the discussion of protection came 
up in those sessions," said Mr. Horwitz, 
"the claim was made that because the first- 
run theatres charged so much more than 
the neighborhood theatres they were en- 
titled to the protection they were asking. 
Granting that these first-run theatres were 
entitled to this protection because of the 
difference in admission prices, they charging 
from 20 cents to 45 cents more than the 
neighborhood theatres, now with the price- 
slashing by these same first-run theatres 
which, in many instances, has lessened the 
gap in admission prices down to as little 
as 5 cents, and, in the most extreme cases, 
referring to the 10 cent houses, a difference 
of 25 cents, can you for any reason see 
why the first-runs should now receive as 
much protection as they received hereto- 
fore?" 

Prices — and Receipts 

Mr. Horwitz cites the prices now obtain- 
ing in Cleveland theatres, and then ques- 
tions the justification of an exclusive run 
policy. "I particularly refer," he writes, 
"to the house playing exclusive pictures and 
doing so at prices of 25 cents matinee and 
35 cents evenings, and I know of theatres 
that are charging 25 and 30 cents evening 
prices. Can the producers now claim that 
the reason they do not want to sell these 25 
and 30 cent houses is because their admis- 
sion price is so much lower than their first- 
runs ?" 

"It is a known and conceded fact," the 



theatre owner writes, "that the producers 
are receiving far less revenue from the first- 
run theatres than they received the season 
before; first, because of the average drop 
in business in all theatres, and, second, be- 
cause of the big drop in admission prices, 
which eventually lessens the gross receipts. 
But on the other hand I know of several 
producers right here in Cleveland who have 
insisted on the same prices from the inde- 
pendent exhibitor that was paid the previous 
season. Is the independent exhibitor a 
miracle man that he can pay the same 
prices as last year? His attendance has 
dropped in comparison as much as the first- 
runs, and his admission prices have dropped 
but not in as great a proportion as the first- 
run theatres have." 

In suggesting producer effort to eliminate 
the double feature and the two-for-one, as 
well as to limit exhibition of certain prod- 
uct according to admission scale, Mr. Hor- 
witz warns that the exhibitor alone cannot 
solve these problems. "It is the tendency of 
all exhibitors to want to play the best prod- 
uct made," he said, "and if such a plan could 
be worked out, I believe you would find a 
great majority of the better neighborhood 
theatres would immediately raise their ad- 
mission prices." 



Paramount IVins 
Southern V ?rdict 

A statement from Paramount's home of- 
fice, released Wednesday, said: 

"Before Federal Court Judge Glenn, at 
Florence, S. C, a jury awarded to Paramount 
Publix a verdict in their favor ammounting to 
approximately $2,500, against J. M. O'Dowd, 
operating the O'Dowd theatre in Florence. The 
decision is considered by the motion picture 
distributing industry to be one of the most 
important ever given on film contracts in the 
southeast, mostly because of the nature of the 
suit, and also beca,use it involved the import- 
ant question of whether an exhibitor had the 
right to break a contract and stop playing pic- 
tures because of his personal opinion as to the 
quality." 



Goldsnnith Begins Consulting 
Practice in Sound Field 

Dr. A. N. Goldsmith, whose resignation 
as vice-president and general engineer of 
RCA became efifective January 1, begins 
this month a general consulting practice in 
the broadcasting and sound picture field. 
He will also be consulting engineer for 
RCA. 

Dr. Goldsmith will retain all of his execu- 
tive organization posts, including that of 
president of the SMPE. His offices are at 
570 Lexington avenue. New York. 



Thalberg III; Mayer in Place 

Louis B. Mayer has taken over active 
operation of MGM production at the studio 
during the absence of Irving Thalberg, re- 
ported suffering a nervous breakdown. He 
is expected to return to the studio next 
month. 



PLANNED 
PROCEDURE 

(Continued from page 8) 

good-will on the part of the public and its- 
leaders in all branches of human activity. 
Such good-will, while an essential need of 
the industry, may also be one of its great- 
est assets. Every effort, however great, to- 
obtain and maintain such good-will is well 
worth the while. 

It Is therefore suggested that the busi- 
ness of motion pictures give thought to a 
comprehensive program of planned pro- 
cedure in order that it shall be adequately 
equipped and prepared to avoid repetition 
of past mistakes and to realize proportion- 
ately the vast promise of the future. 



Report du Fonts 
Seeking Eastman 

Impending acquisition of Eastman Kodak 
Company by the du Ponts of Delaware was 
reported Wednesday by the New York 
American in a signed article by Julius G. 
Berens, financial editor, which said: 

"Operating with secrecy the du Pont inter- 
ests have been negotiating for control of East- 
man or of sufficient stock interest to represent 
working control. Highest ranking executives 
of du Pont refused either to 'confirm or deny' 
that they seek control of Eastman. It was con- 
ceded, however, that the information 'might be 
premature.' 

"By acquisition of Eastman the du Ponts 
would secure the greatest part of the business 
of supplying the motion picture industry with 
film, cameras, projecting machines and similar 
paraphernalia. Du Pont now manufactures film 
but Kodak has been the largest factor in the 
field." 

After contacting the home office at Wil- 
mington, Newton I. Steers, president of du 
Pont Film Manufacturing Corporation in 
New York, said : "There have been many 
unfounded rumors. This is one of them." 
Eastman officially answered the report 
through its president, William G. Stuber, 
who said: "If the du Pont company is ab- 
sorbing Eastman Kodak I know nothing 
about it. We hear reports like that off and 
on. If anyone would know about such a 
thing I think I would." 



Wurtzel Fox Unit Producer; 
Gain Will Be Studio Manager 

J. J. Gain, former general manager of the 
Paramount New York studio, and recently 
named casting head at the Fox Coast studio, 
will replace Sol Wurtzel as executive man- 
ager of the studio, it was announced by 
Sidney R. Kent, president, on his arrival 
on the Coast this week. Mr. Wurtzel will 
become a unit producer. 

Mr. Wurtzel will be the second unit 
producer on the Fox lot, as Jesse L. Lasky 
is producing eight for the company under 
a recent contract. With Mr. Wurtzel pro- 
ducing probably six to eight pictures a 
year, pressure of work will be taken from 
Winfield Sheehan, in charge of production. 



January 14, 1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



13 



iiiiiii 



THE CAMERA CEP€CT$ 






FROM GERMANY. Anofher importation of foreign thesplan 
talent — Wera Engels, who has been brought over by RKO Radio. 
Her first appearance in an American picture will be in Richard 
Dix's new Radio picture, "The Great Jasper." 



A VACATION REST? Claudette Colbert hastens to the Big 
Town to catch up on her shopping, take In a few shows and, 
perhaps, to rest before rushing Coastward to play the feminine 
lead In "I Cover the Waterfront" for United Artists. 



^^^^^^^^^^^ 







WHICH IS JIMMY? A trio of Cagneys, one of whom (It's none HAPPY THOUGH MARRIED. Not really married, but that's the 

too easy to guess- which), Is the celebrated James's brother Bill. way it is In the story. Warren William, Warner Brothers' star, 

The Warner Brothers' star Is shown arriving In Hollywood from is show^jwlth his new leading woman, Constance Cummlngs, who 

New York. Also greeting him Is Mrs. Cagney. appears^ opposite him in First National's "Mind Reader." 



14 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14. 1933 




HAUTEUR. (Below) Whether intentional 
or not, it's there in this new portrait of 
Joan Crawford, MGM star. Miss Craw- 
ford's co-starring with Gary Cooper in 
a new MGM production, as yet 
titled. 



un- 




CAMERAMAN. One of the impressionistic 
studies used by Paramount News in introducing 
its year-end review. This picture shows Urban 
Santone of the Paramount News staff, with his 

artillery. 



SIGNED FOR ROLE. (Left) Claire 
Windsor, who has been placed under 
contract by World Wide for an im- 
portant role in "Auction in Souls," 
which is being prepared for production 
under the direction of Victor Schert- 
zinger. 



A NEW JUNGLE MAN. (Bblow) Here, 
in a thoroughly fetching camera study, 
is another world's champion swimmer to 
take to the films in the manner of his 
and our) alleged ancestors. He is 
Buster Crabbe, who'll star In Para- 
mount's "King of the Jungle." 




GOING PLACES. As the still photographer 
caught Clark Gable, MGM star, in a stroll 
around the lot. Gable's latest role will be a 
co-starring part with Helen Hayes in "The 
White Sister," under Victor Fleming's direction. 



January 14, 1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



15 



HAM AND EGGS FROM THE STUDIOS 

Kate Smith's Picture Is Real , 



With no desire to make puns, we wish 
to report that the big event of the week on 
the preview front was Kate Smith. Para- 
mount previewed her first starring picture, 
aptly titled by her familiar ether call, "Hello 
Everybody." 

We were edified by Mr. Terry Ramsaye's 
recent request for more ham and eggs, less 
caviar, on the screen — with which we are 
in accord 105 per cent. "Hello Everybody" 
is ham and eggs. And, recognizing the tre- 
mendous radio popularity of its portly 
star, it looks as if it should be interesting 
to cinema shoppers. If they go inside, un- 
less they have the caviar taste, they are 
likely to find themselves getting their 
money's worth. 

The plot is as venerable as "Shore Acres," 
the power company trying to steal the an- 
cestral farm. Kate fights them, lands a 
broadcasting contract which enables her to 
carry on the legal battle, catapults to na- 
tional fame over the radio, and there you 
are. Which means that in the last half of 
the picture, mostly you see as well as hear 
Kate Smith. She has a lovely personality. 
During the filming she captivated everyone 
with her simple wholesomeness. She has a 
grand smile, and when she sings and smiles, 
and smiles and sings, it is very pleasant to 
take. 

Charley Grapewin, Frank Darien and a 
comparative newcomer named Fern Emmett 
handle the rural comedy, the David Harum 
type, most entertainingly. Randolph Scott 
and Sally Blane carry along the romance 
pleasantly. Bill Seiter had the good sense 
to let Kate just be herself, and Arthur 
Johnston and Sam Coslow have provided 
half a dozen sweet ballads for her to sing. 

A Bridge Comedy 

In line with their established policy of 
turning out topical stories, Warners pre- 
viewed "Grand Slam," devoted to the most 
popular of indoor sports, bridge. Unlike 
the bridge players, it does not take the sub- 
ject seriously. It is treated for laugh pur- 
poses, and quite successfully, judging from 
the preview audience reaction. An unusual 
phase is the appearance of Paul Lukas in a 
comedy role, which he does to the queen's 
taste. There is a lot of fun in "Grand 
Slam" and it should have a wide appeal. 

Warners announced this week, by the 
way, that they would start off the year 
with a big spurt. In addition to six pictures 
now in production, thirteen more were said 
to be ready for shooting, scripts completed 
and final casting under way. 

Not much else to report in the way of 
new pictures. Sort of a lull over the holi- 
days, though there are a number in the final 
editing which will pop out very shortly. 
De^^mber never is very much of a produc- 
tion month, especially the latter half. 

The big Fox leader, "Cavalcade," was to 
burst upon Hollywood Thursday at the 
Chinese theatre, with a Sid Grauman pro- 



Food, Says Meehan; So Too of 
Warner Comedy of Bridge Table 

by LEO MEEHAN 

Hollywood Staff Correspondent 

logue, with Prexy Sidney Kent in town 
for it, and the cinemalites all out for the 
event. Winfield Sheehan is receiving plenty 
of congratulations on all sides for what 
admittedly was a tricky job to do. 

The biggest Los Angeles disturbance of 
the week was over advertising copy on 
Ruth Chatterton's "Frisco Jenny," in which 
Jenny tells what she did with the ten com- 
mandments, what she will do with any new 
ones, and so on. A terrific local yowl went 
up; newspaper editors were stormed by 
irate readers. The Hays office was raked 
over the coals, too. Serious threats were 
made of censorship as a measure of reprisal 
if it happened again, and the threats came 
from powerful sources. The Los Angeles 
Times advised the theatre exploiters their 
copy must be in 24 hours in advance for 
okay if they wanted to be certam of its 
acceptance. 

Hollywood Folic Jittery 

Paramount's production organization is 
all of a dither once more, following the 
sudden summoning of Emanuel Cohen to 
New York and the resignation of John 
Hertz. [Adolph Zukor, president of Para- 
mount, stated later in New York that "there 
is absolutely no truth in the malicious 
rumor that Emanuel Cohen, vice president 
in charge of production, is leaving Para- 
mount." — Ed.] Despite the generally satis- 
factory product the studio has been turning 
out the past few months, changes in execu- 
tive setups there have kept artists and writ- 
ers on pins and needles. Just about the 
time the ink has been dry on some boss's 
statement that everything was under con- 
trol, a change would be announced. Like 
almost everyone else in America, Holly- 
wood folk are pretty jittery these days. 

Then there was the sudden week-end 
flareup with Fraulein von Dietrich. Para- 
mount sued her in the federal courts for 
alleged failure to prepare herself to go into 
"Song of Songs." Within 48 hours the suit 
was withdrawn and Dietrich announced 
through her attorney that she would make 
the picture, but that she still did not con- 
sider the role suitable. Local sympathy is 
with Rouben Mamoulian, who has to direct 
her while in this mood. The temporary 
truce did not include any promise that the 
fair Marlene would stop appearing publicly 
in men's pants. 

The genial Mr. Pat Casey, who suavely 
smooths out the wrinkles in cinematic labor 
disputes, is back in town after his hectic 
days with the projectionists in Manhattan. 
After surveying the "local situation," he 
blandly announced there was nothing 
wrong out here. In contrast, of course, 
there isn't. A few minor disputes have 
arisen through general cuts in wages, but 
nothing which cannot be readily adjusted. 
Pat could handle those to the satisfaction 
of all concerned with one hand tied behind 
him. 



Ben Schulberg started plenty of discus- 
sion around the Writers club by announcing 
that in his opinion "no author should be 
under contract and assured of a weekly 
salary regardless of the type of work he 
turns out." 

The writers, of course, have varied opin- 
ions. Undoubtedly the trend is in favor of 
short term writer contracts except in the 
cases of a few aces who practically can 
write their own tickets. It is now more 
the fashion to engage a writer to do one 
script at a time at an established figure. 
The figure usually is split up something 
like this : A payment is made when the first 
treatment is submitted. If it is satisfactory 
the writer is told to go ahead with a de- 
tailed treatment. If not, the deal ends right 
there. If he goes ahead, another payment 
is made when the detailed treatment is ac- 
cepted. Final payment is made when the 
shooting script, with dialogue inserted, is 
accepted. 

Muller Awarded 
Monopoly V ^rdict 

.A federal jury in the United States dis- 
trict court for the southern district of In- 
diana, at Indianapolis, this week returned 
a verdict of $40,189.50 in favor of Harry 
Muller, Anderson, Ind., exhibitor, in his suit 
charging conspiracy in restraint of trade and 
violation of the Clayton anti-trust act against 
Fox, Universal, United Artists, Pathe, RKO 
and Tiffany. 

The verdict is seen as establishing an im- 
portant precedent in trade practice under 
similar circumstances. Prior to the taking 
of the case by the jury. Electrical Research 
Products, Inc., also a defendant, had been 
eliminated when Federal Judge Balzell had 
ordered the jury to return a verdict in its 
favor. The action led to the belief that the 
plaintiff would lose his case. 

The suit, originally brought in October, 
1930, involved $600,000 damages. The jury's 
verdict will automatically be tripled under 
the provisions of the Clayton act and the 
defense will also be required to pay attor- 
neys' fees, estimated at approximately $20,- 
000. The suit revolved about Mr. Muller's 
alleged inability to procure film after he 
had failed to pay a $300 arbitration award 
to Fox. Defense attorneys have refused 
to discuss the possibilities of an appeal be- 
ing taken from the verdict. 



"U" Deal for England 

Universal has completed a deal with Eff- 
tee Film of Australia for distribution of 
six features and several shorts in England. 



16 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14, 1933 



CAVALCADE 

as seen at the Gaiety Theatre, 
New York 

by TERRY RAMSAYE 

And behold a pale horse, and he that sat upon him, his name 
was Death, and hell followed him. And power was given to him 
over the four parts of the earth, to kill with sword, with famine, 
and with death, and with the beasts of the earth. 

Apocalypse 6:8 



Now "Cavalcade" has come to the screen 
to warn us again that the four horsemen 
of the Apocalypse still ride us down to 
doom. It is the mea culpa of Civilization 
recited in a sweep of spectacle, pageantry 
and drama for which the motion picture is 
the only capable medium. 

It is to be taken as a gesture of magnifi- 
cent daring, in keeping quite with screen 
tradition, that the Fox Film Corporation 
and its production chief, Mr. Winfield Shee- 
han, should fling this challenging picture 
into the world of today. With its vast cost 
it is extraordinary speculation; with its con- 
tent of emotion and thought it is tremen- 
dous adventure in showmanship. 

"Cavalcade" will be found impressive, ab- 
sorbing, alike to those who also think as 
well as to those who can, and do, but feel. It 
is, by force of the motion picture, a more 
fluent restatement of the observations of 
Mr. Noel Coward, the author, pertaining 
to the bitter comedy of the civilized por- 
tions of the human race, seen for the most 
part through the eyes of a wife and mother 
in the span of a generation. 

Major Expression 

This "Cavalcade," apart from our more 
immediate concern with it as remarkable 
screen merchandise of today, is impressive 
for the place which it occupies, or is likely 
to be found to occupy presently, in the flow 
of major motion picture expression. In the 
amazingly superior technique of the mod- 
ern camera it says again, more emphatically, 
what the late Mr. Thomas H. Ince set down 
in "Civilization," what Mr. David Wark 
Griffith essayed to say in the splendid inco- 
herence of "Intolerance," what Vicente 
Blasco Ibanez was thinking about when he 
wrote his "Four Horsemen of the Apoca- 
lypse," which found its way to the screen 
as somewhat more of a drama of amour than 
fate. Coincidentally it is to be set down 
here that the same Mr. Richard Rowland, 
who so affected the course of commercial 
screen history by his impulsively intuitive 
election to make the Ibanez story in the 
silent years ago, is again an instrument of 
destiny in bringing "Cavalcade" into the 
realm of motion picture attention. 

Pictorially the piece marks a definite as- 
similation of the best in modern camera 
technique. The photography is accredited 
to Mr. Ernest Palmer. It utilizes most of 
the more recently acquired capacities of the 
camera with a most complete acceptance 
and none of the touches of self-conscious- 
ness of "angles, trolleys and zooms" which 
have so often come between the spectator 
and the story in the last few years of Holly- 



wood. Partly, perhaps, this has been 
achieved in the eye-education of the spec- 
tator, but certainly in "Cavalcade" the 
camera is never permitted to get too smart 
at the expense of the story. 

And while it is warranted more as a gen- 
eralization concerning current production 
than as an observation concerning "Caval- 
cade," one vvonders why, when hundreds 
upon hundreds of thousands of dollars are 
spent on the pictorial and- verbal content of 
screen production, with the world combed 
for talent, at least a sixpence of thought 
might not be given now and then toward 
the simple matter of achieving for main 
and credit titles typography that would at 
least not be invasive of the impression of 
quality in the material that follows. The 
screen has little indeed to do with the 
printed word, but the little that it has is, in 
the main, far from magnificent. There is 
an art of typography and it has its compe- 
tent authorities. Typography on the screen 
27 feet high by 36 feet wide tends to be 
conspicuous. 

It is but incidental that the story, made 
entirely in the Fox West Coast studios, is 
British, that its cast and locales are British. 
This mayhap will help the picture a bit in 
the rest of the English-speaking world, but 
it is not at the expense of an intelligent 
American interest. 

Narrative Technique Competent 

The story opens with the impact of the 
high crisis of the Boer-British war, during 
the siege of Mafeking, on the upper-class 
London household of Robert and Jane Mar- 
ryot. The story includes drawing room and 
servants' hall, picking up the all too hu- 
man strands of the lives of the Bridges, 
butler and maid, and weaving them through, 
with the rise of the second generation, in a 
narrative technique which competently runs 
from the minutiae of the cook, crying into 
the pastry batter to the moving of troop 
ships, and takes in its stride everything 
from the cooing of young love to London 
raided by Zeppelins and the hell of Flanders 
fields. Queen Victoria dies, the Titanic 
sinks, the world goes warring and society 
cockeyed, jazz is born. Through it all in a 
glamored dignity, Jane Marryot, and Rob- 
ert, becoming the while Lady Jane and Sir 
Robert, keep the faith of the values of the 
old order, maintaining against all that 
breaks about them a citadel from which they 
see with tolerant, questioning eyes, but do 
not accept. It would appear that in this 
fashion Mr. Coward is seeking to say to us 
that, despite the change, change, change, the 
hectic rout of the race and its jumbling of 



codes and fashions, the hope for To- 
morrow lies yet in the fundamentals of prin- 
ciple, honor and virtue, unchanged eternals. 

That the film "Cavalcade" should do this 
so competently, so lucidly and with none of 
those banalities and proclamations of the 
obvious which have so often made the screen 
a hissing among the intelligent, is a tri- 
umph. A hundred times or more in the 
two hours of film speeding at 90 feet a 
minute the direction has opportunity to slip 
down into pathos and blah and does not. 
It is directed by Frank Lloyd. As a stage 
production it ran in London for some 400 
and odd performances in 11 months and it 
has been one of the most vigorously dis- 
cussed, assayed, evaluated and debated pieces 
of material between London and Broadway 
these several years. 

Won Critics' Approval 

The picture opened at the Gaiety in 
Broadway on Thursday night and won gen- 
eral approval of the critics of the public 
press. The house, with some 800 seats, has 
been sold out since and considerably in ad- 
vance. The selling program for the pic- 
ture in detail has not been announced. It 
is assumed that at least for certain key cities 
it will be presented as a roadshow. Inci- 
dental to the Gaiety showing, it is preceded 
by a Magic Carpet of Movietone devoted 
to the beauties of Capri containing photog- 
raphy of a rare quality, fit in tempo and 
quality to be a prelude to "Cavalcade." It is 
there just to let the house get seated, but 
it is good enough to justify being on time. 

Produced and distributed by Fox. Directed by 
Frank Lloyd. From the play by Noel Coward. Screen 
play by Regrinald Berkeley. Continuity by Sonya 
Levien. Assistant director, William Tummel. Di- . 
rector of dialogue, Goerge Hadden. War scenes by 
William Cameron Menzies. Art director, William 
Darling. Film editor, Margaret Clancy. Plioto- 
graphed by Ernest Palmer. Sound recorder, J. E. 
Aiken. Ladies' costumes by Earl Luick. Release 
date undetermined. Running time, 110 minutes. 
CAST 

Jane Marryot Diana Wynyard 

Robert Marryot Clive Brook 

Fanny Bridges Ursula Jeans 

Alfred Bridges Herbert Mundm 

Ellen Bridges Una O'Connor 

Annie ■ Merle Tottenham 

Margaret Harris Irene Browne 

Cook Beryl Mercer 

Joe Marryot Frank Lawton 

Edward Marryot ..John Warburton 

Edith Harris Magaret Lindsay 

Mrs. Snapper Temple Piggott 

George Granger Billy Bevan 

Ronnie Tames Desmond Roberts 

Uncle Dick Frank Atkinson 

Mirabelle Ann Shaw 

Ada Adele Crane 

Tommy Jolly Will Stanton 

Lieutenant Edgar Stuart Hall 

Duchess of Churt Mary Forbes 

Major Domo Montague Shaw 

Uncle George Lionel Belmore 

Edward (age 12) Dick Henderson. Jr. 

Joey (age Douglas Scott 

Edith (age lO') Sheila MacGill 

Fanny (age 7-12) Bonita Granville 



January 14, 1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 1 7 



2,000-FOOT REEL ADOPTION SEEN 
AS CERTAINTY BY LESTER COWAN 



Academy Executive Secretary 
Leaves for Coast Following 
Favorable Reception to Plan 
for Revising Ten Practices 

Favorable reception has met all of the 
ten projects embodied in the program for 
correcting certain technical practices, which 
was proposed by the Research Council of 
the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and 
Sciences. The adoption of a standard 2,000- 
foot reel length is a certainty, according 
to Lester Cowan, executive secretary of the 
Council, on the eve of his departure for the 
west coast this week. 

"The industry will definitely adopt the 
2,000-foot reel," said Mr. Cowan. "The re- 
ception of all the other projects has been 
so favorable that there is little doubt but 
they also will be accepted by the producing 
companies, distributors, circuits and equip- 
ment manufacturers." Mr. Cowan has been 
in New York conferring with home office 
executives of distributors, theatres and ex- 
changes, and leading equipment manufac- 
turers. 

Four of the Academy's ten recommendations 
for improving certain trade practices were dis- 
cussed in Motion Picture Herald last week. 
These embraced uniform use of a 2,000-foot 
reel to hold 1,700 feet of film ; revised higher 
quality for release prints ; standardization of 
format of scripts and an investigation of film 
preservatives. Reports by the Research Coun- 
cil on the remaining six recommendations 
follow : 

V V V 

STUDY OF CORRECTION OF 
DISTORTION IN PROJECTION 

Committee 

John Livadary, Chairman ; Dr. Burton F. 
Miller. 

Digest of Preliminary Report 

As the result of studies to date the commit- 
tee reported that it has been found impractical 
to seek a method for the correction of either 
the keystone effect or the non-uniformity of 
focus without considering both simultaneously, 
as any method attempting to correct the latter 
will affect the former. 

Action of Council 

The procedure of the committee to date was 
approved and the Council authorized the Acad- 
emy Executive Secretary to communicate with 
the Bausch and Lomb Optical Company, the 
optical division of the Bell and Howell Com- 
pany and other manufacturers regarding the 
desired cooperation. 

V V V 

STUDY OF ECONOMIES 
IN RECORDING 

Committee 

E. H. Hansen, Chairman; C. Roy Hunter, 
Nathan Levinson, Wesley C. Miller. 
Objectives 

To further the development of the new tech- 
niques. To gather all available information 
on present studio practices of split film record- 
ing, correlate this data and re-distribute it to 
the companies concerned in order to reduce du- 
plication of effort and expense of individual ac- 
tion by each studio. 

Digest of Preliminary Report 

A symposium survey of the various develop- 



ments in sound recording technique has been 
conducted by the committee. A report has been 
prepared for distribution to the various studio 
technical department executives. On the basis 
of studies to date, the committee stated that 
additional economies may be effected by modi- 
fication in the technique of recording and film 
handling. The committee recommended that 
a further study be made, especially of the single 
system of recording and editing with a view to 
possible adaptation of all or portions of this 
system to the various studio organizations. 

Action of Council 

The procedure of the committee to date was 
approved ; the distribution of the symposium re- 
port of the committee to the sound and labo- 
ratory executives of the various studios was 
approved and the committee was authorized to 
conduct the recommended further investiga- 
tion. 

V V V 

STUDY OF MORE EFFICIENT 
USE OF THE 3 5MM. 
FILM AREA 

Problem 

The addition of the sound track and the 
changes in image frame brought about by the 
requirements of sound pictures have resulted 
in considerable areas of the standard 35 mm. 
film not being used. The width of tVi° sound 
track is now matted off in the camera from 
the negative. On both the negative and posi- 
tive approximately 14 per cent of the length 
of the film is now taken up by frame lines. 

Committee 

Douglas Shearer, Chairman ; John Cass, Carl 
Dreher, Bert Glennan, K. F. Morgan, J. M. 
Nickolaus. 

Digest of Preliminary Report 

The committee has been investigating the va- 
rious possibilities for economies outlined at the 
last meeting of the Council and has been mak- 
ing recording and photography tests to deter- 
mine the practicality of the ideas advanced. As 
the many complications inherent in develop- 
ments along this line necessitate a careful con- 
sideration of all points before a decision is an- 
nounced, the committee requested the authoriza- 
tion of the Council to proceed with the investi- 
gation now in process. 

Action of Council 

The procedure of the committee to date was 
approved and the committee authorized to con- 
tinue its investigations. 

V V V 

ELIMINATION OF BLIMPS 
THROUGH DEVELOPMENT 
OF A SILENT CAMERA 

Problem 

Four years after the introduction of sound, 
the studios are still using heavy, clumsy, ex- 
pensive blimps to shield camera noise from the 
microphone. Manufacturers have promised a 
silent camera, but no satisfactory camera suffi- 
ciently silent to be worked in closeups without 
the aid of any external silencing device has 
been put on the market. While the compara- 
tive tests conducted by the Academy last year 
stimulate the improvement of blimps, the defi- 
nite and urgent demand of the production 
studios for a camera sufficiently quiet not to 
require external silencing devices has not been 
met. 

Committee 

Virgil Miller, Chairman; John Arnold, John 
Boyle, John Cass, William Eglinton, Bert 
Glennon, Lorin D. Grignon, Kenneth Lambert. 



Proposals of Research Council 
for Technical Readjustment 
Expected by Cowan to Meet 
with Approval of Companies 

Grover Laube, K. F. Morgan, William F. Ru- 
dolph, John Seitz, Theodore Soderberg, Al 
Trandeau, A. G. Wise. 

Digest of Preliminary Report 

At almost weekly meetings since its forma- 
tion, the committee has gathered and classified 
data useful for the development of a silent 
camera and has drawn up tentative specifications 
for the acceptability of such a camera. Noise 
spectrum and intensity tests are being arranged 
for to determine the exact properties of present 
extraneous noises. 

Action of Council 

The procedure to date was approved and 
the committee authorized to proceed with the 
program outlined. 

V V V 
STANDARDIZATION OF 
SCREEN ILLUMINATION 
FOR STUDIO REVIEW ROOMS 

Committee 

Nathan Levinson, chairman. 

The question of standardizing the illumina- 
tion of screens in studio previewing rooms, in- 
cluding the correlated phase of candlepower of 
illumination, is the most recent to be taken 
under advisement by the Research Council. 

V V V 
STANDARDIZATION ON 
NON-HALATION TINT 

Committee 

Carl Dreher, Chairman ; Emery Huse, Max 
Parker, Victor Milnor. 
Objectives 

To conduct such surveys and tests as nec- 
essary to establish the relative merits of using 
whites and tints. To demonstrate, if possible 
that the new film stocks permit satisfactory 
use of the actual whites for photography as the 
simplest and cheapest solution. To correlate 
the information from tests already made, and 
secure any further data needed. 

Final Report of Committee 

After considering the history and technical 
factors involved, the committee recommended 
that the use of all anti-halation chromatic fin- 
ishes used as substitutes for white be discon- 
tinued. It further recommended that when a 
non-halating substitute for white is desired, in- 
stead of the variety of tints now used, all stu- 
dios standardize upon the shade known as Pick- 
ford, or pearl gray. 

Action of Council 

The recommendations of the committee were 
approved and adopted for circulation among 
the studios and the membership of the Actors' 
Branch. 

Loew's Ohio Protective 
Committee Asks for Stock 

A recently formed protective committee 
of stockholders of Loew's Ohio Theatres, 
Inc., Cleveland, is calling upon sharehold- 
ers to deposit their stock with the com- 
mittee. The action follows submission of a 
reorganization plan by a committee repre- 
senting bondholders of Loew's Ohio and 
two subsidiaries, which were about to de- 
fault payment of interest on securities. 



18 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14, 1933 



WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT? 



NEWS ITEM : — "Preparations are being made 
Radio City Music Hall." 



for change of entertuinment policy a- 



, QUACK-/ GDcAc/r ' 




tM TOP (?F StADtUM CAN OIST)/06U|£^ '6m | On 




BACAAjcf^iS ACTS', 



(%A.0lO C,«TV 
HUS'C • NA-tL 



MAH-P IT (NTo a RAOfO 

r'<s,TA'"^iCf^ ^N'O PROM IDE T'-'J- 




-'.'^ The "\)oTe pRfLUD sc:a(.0a 





from the New York World-Telegram of January 9 



Warner Zone Executives 
Confer on Theatre Problems 

Warner theatre zone managers were 
called to New York last week to confer 
with executives on policies and problems 
confronting individual zones. The meetings 
were presided over by Joseph Bernhard, in 
charge of Warner theatres. 

Among those attending were Dave 
Weshner, I. J. Hoffman, Moe Silver, Clay- 
ton Bond, Ted Schlanger, Mort Blumen- 
stock, Willard Paterson, Herman Maier, 
Joe Hornstein, Frank Cahill, James Coston, 
Nat Wolf, B. E. Hoffman, Don Jacocks, 
Lou Lazar, George Henger, William Gold- 
man, Harry Kalmine, J. J. Payette, Lee 
Goldberg and Sol Honkin. 



38 Fox Northwest Houses 
Operated in Receivership 

The 38 theatres in Washington, Oregon 
and Montana owned by Pacific Northwest 
Theatres, Inc., a subsidiary of Fox West 
Coast Theatres, Inc., are being operated 
by Frank L. Newman, Sr., and Donald 
Graham, Fox West Coast attorney, as re- 
ceivers under the jurisdiction of the federal 
court at Seattle. New financial arrange- 
ments have been made for all houses in- 
volved and the name "Fox" or "Fox West 
Coast" has been dropped from advertising. 



Georgia Sues Warners 

Asserting that chain gang life is rosier 
than depicted in Warner Bros, production, 
"I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang," 
Vivian L. Stanley, secretary of the Georgia 
Prison Commission, has filed two suits 
against Warners charging libel and seeking 
$1,000,000 in each suit. 



Playwright Dead 

Barry Connors, playwright, died last 
week in Hollywood. He was asphyxiated 
when fire swept through the building in 
which he lived. Connors, who was 49, 
wrote "The Patsy" and "So This Is Poli- 
tics." 



Paramount Directors* Offices 

Construction on five new oflSces for direc- 
tors was started last week at Paramount's 
Hollywood studios. 



ff^ m. Fox Is Sued 
By Receiver For 
General Theatres 

United States Senator Daniel O. Hast- 
ings of Wilmington, Del., receiver of Gen- 
eral Theatres Equipment, Inc., has filed suit 
in chancery court at Wilmington, against 
William Fox and All Continent Corpora- 
tion for the cancellation of $2,300,000 of 
notes of General Theatres Equipment held 
by All Continent Corporation. All Conti- 
nent is alleged personal holding company 
for William Fox. 

The bill of complaint was filed on behtlf 
of the receiver by G. L. Ward, Jr., of the 
firm of Marvel, Morford, Ward and Logan 
of Wilmington. It sets forth that on April 5, 
1930, when General Theatres acquired from 
William Fox control of Fox Film and Fox 
Theatres, a part of the agreement between 
Mr. Fox and General Theatres was a pro- 
vision that Mr. Fox was to have a 10 per 
cent interest in any underwriting by Gen- 
eral Theatres of stock of Fox Film Cor- 
poration. General Theatres also agreed to 
use of its best efforts, according to the com- 
plaint, to increase this 10 per cent. 

Shortly after this agreement had been 
reached, the complaint sets forth. General 
Theatres acquired 1,600,000 shares of Fox 
Class A common, for which it paid $48,- 
000,000. Fox, it is alleged, demanded 20 
per cent participation in the 1,600,000 
shares, but General Theatres denied he was 
entitled to more than 160,000. 

A controversy ensued between General 
Theatres and Mr. Fox, and on June 1, 1930, 
Albert M. Greenfield, of Philadelphia, is 
said to have gone to Harley L. Clarke, 
president of General Theatres, and offered 
to intercede to effect a settlement with Fox. 
Greenfield was employed for this purpose, 
and General Theatres agreed to pay him 
$250,000 if the matter was settled. 

Eventually the dispute between Fox and 
General Theatres was settled through 
Greenfield, Fox receiving $2,800,000 in 
notes of General Theatres. One of these 
notes was for $300,000, and petition alleges 
it was received by Greenfield from All- 
Continent, representing his 10 per cent. 

General Theatres paid Mr. Greenfield his 
$250,000 commission, complaint states. 

The complainant seeks to recover from 
Fox and All-Continental a voting certifi- 
cate representing 108,000 shares of Fox 
Film Class A stock and 50,000 shares of 
stock of Grandeur, Inc., which were orig- 
inally held by All-Continent as collateral to 
the General Theatres notes and were sold 
by it at auction, but bought in by All-Con- 
tinent and are now held by it. It also 
seeks recovery of $200,000 paid by Gjeneral 
Theatres in reduction of the notes, $163,- 
699.99 paid as interest on the notes and 
$50,000 paid by General Theatres to the 
attorneys for All-Continent for services in 
connection with a renewal of the notes. 

After the complaint was filed a restrain- 
ing order was issued by Chancellor Wolcott 
restraining All-Continent from disposing of 
the notes of General Theatres held by it, and 
also from attempting to enforce the notes. 
An application has been made on behalf of 
the receiver for a temporary injunction, and 
the chancellor ordered that this application 
be heard on February 31. 




ERE IS THE GREATEST 



Greatest reviews 
since "Birth of a 
Nation." Every 
critic of every 
paper joined in 
the full-throated 
storm of acclaim. 



of 



made 



Richard Watts, Jr. 
N. Y. HERALD TRIBUNE 



A 



BEAUTIFUL, stirring, dig- 
nified, memorable film ha^ 
been made by Fox Films from 

Noel Coward's tremendous, pa- 
triotic spectacle, "Cavalcade/' 



William Boehnel 
N. Y. WORLD TELEGRAM 



>te4 



lot 



tVve 



Ad 



/renf Thirer 
N. Y. DAILY NEWS 



It is unfurled with such marked 
good taste and restraint that many 
an eye will be misty after witness- 
ing this, production. 



Mordaunt Hall 
N. Y. TIMES 



1 



TRIUMPH IN SHOW HISTOR 



of the^20 5 'centurv w '" "^^^'^^'^ 
cally from all ^ departs radi- 



Bland Johaneson 
N. Y. DAILY MIRROR 



"Cavalcade" is superbly acted by 
a large cast. It is beautifully pro- 
duced, well nigh perfect. The film 
is moving, inspiring. In short, no 
fault can be found with "Caval- 
cade" here. It seems an auspicious 
beginning for 1933 in the motion 



nltlcmW the pBW" 



picture world. ^^.^.^^^^ 
preaches greatness in the cinema. 
It mus t be seen! 



Malcolm Johnson 
N. Y. SUN 



r 



I— — — ■ -perspective^' 

is an amazing screen nas pr" ^ 

and showmansVnpthe^^^^^ 



Thornton Delehanty '/: 
N. Y. EVENING POST 



"Cavalcade,*' the Noel Coward play that enthralled Lon 

don theatregoers for months, has been brought to the screen by 

the Fox Film Company. And Fox has made of it a magnificent 

picture. A picture that is emotionally exciting, 
impressively dramatic 



ent I 







N. Y. EVENING JOURNAL 






A FOX A<hie«em 



SOLID SE 

from the instant the 

Impatient lines force management to open 
box-office an hour earlier. Capacity every 
show. Public reserving seats 6 to 8 weeks 
in advance. Reservations pouring in from 
Canada ... and as far west as St. Louis. 
Great news travels fast! 



Genius at ^hite- 
heat forged this 
superlative FOX 
master-picture ...a 
symbol of the great- 
er product coming 
from FOXthisyear! 




''■'Am 



i 





XHIEVEMi 



January 14, 1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



25 



MUSIC HALL STARTS COMBINATION 
POLICY AS RKO ROXY CONTINUES 



Policy Decision on the Roxy 
Uncertain; Cabinet of Seven 
RKO Executives Takes Over 
Operation of Both Theatres 

The lavish variety show which opened 
Radio City Music Hall two weeks ago was 
abandoned this week for a policy of continu- 
ous stage and screen shows at popular 
prices. The RKO Roxy, reported last week 
to be closing its doors, will continue with 
"The Animal Kingdom," for an indefinite 
period. 

Beginning Wednesday, the Music Hall 
will open at 11 a. m. and until 1 p. m. the 
price will be 35 cents for all seats. On 
weekdays a 75-cent top will prevail, and on 
Saturdays, Sundays and holidays there will 
be a 99-cent top. Smoking is permitted on 
all three mezzanines. The film inaugurating 
the change of policy is Columbia's "The Bit- 
ter Tea of General Yen." 

During the week, three members of the 
Radio City executive staff resigned. Rob- 
ert Edmond Jones, art director, resigned 
on the ground that the change of policy 
changed entirely the conditions prevailing 
when he took the position. Originally it 
was planned that there would be one new 
stage show each month. Under present 
policy there will be one each week. Mr. 
Jones was succeeded by Clark Robinson. 
J. H. Turner, general business administra- 
tor of Radio City, also resigned, as did S. 
Jay Kaufman, assistant to Roxy. 

Executive operation of the Music Hall 
and Radio City was turned over late last 
week to an RKO theatre cabinet headed by 
Harold B. Franklin, president of the RKO 
theatre circuit. Originally RKO was not 
supposed to have any operating or manage- 
ment authority over Roxy's two Radio City 
theatres. However, Mr. Franklin this week 
explained that the illness of Roxy is re- 
sponsible for the change in the situation. 

"During the illness of Roxy," said Mr. 
Franklin, "certain matters in connection 
with the theatres had to be adjusted and 
other immediate business carried on. A 
certain course of action being decided upon 
by M. H. Aylesworth, RKO head, the RKO 
theatre organization is cooperating with the 
Roxy organization, as it is our desire to be 
of all possible assistance at this time." 

Roxy was understood to be ready to leave 
the Post Graduate Hospital in New York 
this week, returning to his home to recuper- 
ate from a recent operation. He is sched- 
uled to resume his Radio City duties Janu- 
ary 23. 

The seven members of Mr. Franklin's 
cabinet include M. H. Aylesworth, president 
of RKO ; Martin Beck, in charge of vaude- 
ville activities; Herschel Stuart, general 
manager of the circuit; Phil Reisman, in 
charge of film buying, and Robert F. Sisk, 
director of advertising and publicity. Roxy, 
it was said, will serve on this committee 
when he returns to his duties. 

The recurrent rumor that Roxy had been 
relieved of his authority and would resign, 
and that the decision to make the changes 
in the Music Hall's policy had come after 



HAYS PAYS TRIBUTE 
TO COOLIDGE MEMORY 

Will H. Hays, president of the 
Motion Picture Producers and Dis- 
tributors of America, and long a 
close friend and associate of the late 
Calvin Coolidge, issued the following 
statement following the death of 
Mr. Coolidge: 

The passing of Calvin Coolidge 
removes a towering human landmark 
from the nation he served so well. 
He was a great, unique figure in our 
public life. To those who have served 
with him in the crises of his national 
career he will always remain a symbol 
of Americanism that inherited the 
purest strain of our forefathers. He 
was wise in his leadership and granite 
in his decisions. He saw far and 
looked deep. His was the wisdom of 
one who knew the vast strength of 
our national moorings, whose soul 
tvas filled with indomitable faith in 
his country, and who had inexhaust- 
ible confidence in the fundamental 
integrity and sense of the common 
man. His memory will remain a 
beacon to the generations that will 
follow. 

Mr. Hays wired the sympathy 
of himself and Mrs. Hays to Mrs. 
Coolidge when news of the former 
President's death reached him in 
New York. 



differences between Roxy and RKO officials 
was denied this week by Martin Beck as 
being "simply ridiculous." 

With the opening of Rockefeller Center's 
two de luxe theatres, the Rockefeller family 
finds itself with an important stake in the 
amusement industry. In commenting on this 
situation, the Wall Street Journal said: 
"John D. Rockefeller, Jr., is reputed to be 
one of the largest stockholders in the Chase 
National Bank, which is the banking spon- 
sor for Fox Film Corporation, General The- 
atre Equipment, which owns 1,300,000 
shares of Fox, and for Film Securities 
which holds the 660,900 shares controlling 
interest in Loew's, Inc." 

RKO, which has leased the two Radio 
City theatres, lacks an adequate supply of 
films for both houses, says the Journal, and 
Fox now lacks a Broadway show window, 
so that benefits might result from a combi- 
nation of these companies. 



RKO Offices Ready Jan. 21 

Half of RKO's office space in Radio City 
will be ready January 14, and four other 
floors, completed for the picture and the- 
atre companies, will be completed January 
21. All departments will move on that date. 



Replies to Suit 
On JVorld Wide 

Norman C. Nicholson, counsel for Educa- 
tional-World Wide, issued the following 
statement Tuesday: 

"The stockholder's action which has been 
brought against World Wide Pictures, Inc., a 
.Delaware corporation, by Alexander Aronson, 
a stockholder owning less than 2 per cent of 
the outstanding shares of stock, is not regarded 
seriously by the individual and corporate de- 
fendants. World Wide Pictures, Inc., of Dela- 
ware, is a wholly inactive company, not having 
carried on any business for a period of several 
years, and is not to be confused with World 
Wide Pictures, Inc., a New York corporation, 
the active feature distributor affiliated with 
the Educational organization, which is not a 
defendant in the action." 

Mr. Aronson participated in the forma- 
tion of the old World Wide concern and filed 
action last Saturday through Linet and Sut- 
ton, New York attorneys. "The action will 
be most vigorously defended," said Saul 
Rogers, also of defense counsel. Executives 
and directors of the companies are named 
as co-defendants. The suit seeks an 
accounting from operations and charges 
mismanagement of World Wide afifairs. 
Aronson asks that certain agreements be- 
tween Educational and World Wide be set 
aside. 



^ Grand Hotel ' Tops 
Film Daily 10 Best 

Film Daily's list of 10 best pictures of 
1932, as selected by film critics, was headed 
by MGM's "Grand Hotel" and included 
"The Champ," MGM; "Arrowsmith," 
United Artists; "The Guardsman" and 
"Smilin' Through," MGM ; "Dr. Jekyll and 
Mr. Hyde," Paramount; "Emma," MGM; 
"Bill of Divorcement," RKO Radio; "Back 
Street," Universal; and "Scarface," United 
Artists. 

"Grand Hotel" received 296 votes out 
of a possible 368. 



LeHay Suit Reverts to 
Arbitration in Pathe Case 

Extended litigation between LeHay, Inc., 
operators of the Buffalo Lafayette theatre, 
against Pathe Exchange, Inc., will be set- 
tled by arbitration, according to Pathe ex- 
ecutives. Arbitrators will fix the amount 
to be paid the exhibitor due to alleged 
failure of Pathe to deliver pictures con- 
tracted for before RKO Radio took over 
Pathe and discontinued production under 
the sign of the rooster. 

An appeal has been filed by Pathe against 
the Spitzer west coast interests' suit, but 
as yet the appeal has not been heard. 



26 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14, 1933 



ill ' "' 



M E C T I N e $ 



A calendar of events and meeting dates of exhibitor and production 
associations and other non-commercial organizations in the industry. 



EAST 



JANUARY 

12 — Associated Motion Picfure Advertisers of 
New York: Weekly luncheon and forum, 
at Sardi's, West 44th Street, New York. 
President, Hal Home; Secretary, A! 
Sherman. 

MPTO of Eastern Pa.. So. N. J. and Del.: 

Weekly meeting, at Philadelphia. 
16mm. Motion Picfure Board of Trade: Regu- 
lar luncheon and meeting, at Hotel Victoria, 
51st Street and 7th Avenue, New York. 
President, G. P. Foute; Secretary, A. D. V. 
Storey. 

1 6— ^A$$ociaf ed Assistant Directors of New York: 

Regular meeting and executive committee 
meeting, at Room 506, 251 West 42nd 
Street, New York. President, Joseph Nadel; 
Secretary, Walter Sheridan. 

Allied Theatre Owners of New Jersey: Spe- 
cial meeting for south New Jersey, at 
Hotel Hildebrecht, Trenton. President: 
Sidney E. Samuelson. Headquarters, 303 
West 42nd Street, New York. 

17 — New York Motion Picture Club: Weekly forum 

and luncheon, at 1560 Broadway, New 
York. President, Lee A. Ochs; Secretary, 
Paul Gulick; Manager, George Morris. 

Allied Theatres of Michigan: Directors' meet- 
ing, at 607 Fox Building, Detroit. Presi- 
dent, Glenn A. Cross; Secretary, John E. 
Niebes. 

18 — Allied Theatres of Illinois: Directors' meeting, 

at Room 411, 910 South Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago. President, Aaron Saperstein; 
Secretary, Harry Lasker. 

New York Theatre Owners Chamber of Com- 
merce: Quarterly meeting at Astor Hotel. 
New York. President, Charles L. O'Reilly. 

19 — Associated Motion Picture Advertisers of New 

York: Weekly luncheon and forum, at 
Sardi's, West 44th Street, New York. Presi- 
dent, Hal Horne; Secretary, Al Sherman. 

MPTO of Eastern Pa., So. N. J. and Del.: 

Weekly meeting, at Philadelphia. 

The Lambs Club: Monthly meeting of the 
Council, at 130 West 44th Street, New 
York. 

22 — Film Forum: First meeting, at New School 
for Social Research, New York. 

24 — New York Motion Picture Club: Weekly forum 

and luncheon, at 1560 Broadway, New York. 
President, Lee A. Ochs; Secretary, Paul 
Gulick; Manager, George Morris. 

Allied Theatre Owners of New Jersey: Regu- 
lar meeting, at Hotel Lincoln, New York, 
hteadquarters, 303 West 42nd Street, New 
York. President, Sidney Samuelson. 

25 — ^Allied Theatres of Illinois: Directors' meeting, 

at Room 411, 910 South Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago. President, Aaron Saperstein; 
Secretary, Harry Lasker. 

26 — Associated Motion Picture Advertisers of New 

York: Weekly luncheon and forum, at 
Sardi's, West 44th Street, New York. Presi- 
dent, Hal Home; Secretary, Al Sherman. 

16mm Board of Trade: Regular luncheon and 
meeting, at Hotel Victoria, New York. 
President, G. P. Foute; Secretary, A. D. V. 
Storey. 



MPTO of Eastern Pa., So. N. J. and Del.: 

Weekly meeting, at Philadelphia. 

28 — Warner Club: Ball and Dinner, at Hotel Com- 
modore, Pershing Square, New York. 

31 — New York Motion Picture Club: Weekly forum 
and luncheon, at 1560 Broadway, New York. 
President, Lee A. Ochs; Secretary, Paul 
Gulick; Manager, George Morris. 

FEBRUARY 

I — MPTO of Wisconsin and Upper Michigan: 

Directors' meeting, at 536 West Wisconsin 
Avenue, Milwaukee. President, Fred S. 
Meyer; Secretary, W. L. Ainsworth. 

19 — Film Forum: Regular meeting, at New School 
for Social Research, 66 West 12th St., New 
York. Association's headquarters, 125 West 
45th St. President, Sidney Howard; Secre- 
tary, Margaret Larkin. 

21 — New York Motion Picture Club: Annual Ball 
and Dinner, at Waldorf Astoria Hotel, Park 
Avenue, New York. President, Lee A. Ochs; 
Secretary, Paul Gulick; Ball Chairman, 
William Brandt; Treasurer, Louis F. Blumen- 
thal. 

WEST 

JANUARY 

13 — International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees, Coast Branch: Directors' semi- 
monthly meeting, at 6472 Santa Monica 
Boulevard, Hollywood. Business Represen- 
tative, Lew C. G. Bllx. 

15 — ^Troupers, Inc.: Semi-monthly meeting, at 1642 

El Centro Avenue, Hollywood. President, 
Joseph DeGrasse; Secretary, Adabelle 
Driver. 

16 — Motion Picture Make-Up Artists Association: 

Weekly meeting, at 1666 North Highland 
Avenue, Hollywood. President, Perc West- 
more; Secretary, Jack Lloyd. 

Assistant Directors Association: Semi-monthly 
meeting, at 1605 Cahuenga Boulevard, 
. Hollywood. Executive in charge, Richard 
L'Estrange. 

Theatre Owners' Protective Association: 

Annual convention, at Dallas. President, 
Roy L. Walker; Secretary, I. S. Melcher. 

17 — Federated Motion Picture Studio Crafts: 

Weekly meeting, at 2560 North Beachwood 
Drive, Hollywood. President, Harry W. 
Scott; Secretary, Richard L'Estrange. 

Assistance League: Board of directors' weekly 
meeting, at 5604 DeLongpre Avenue, Holly- 
wood. Managing Director, Mrs. Lee Wray 
Turner. 

International Brothershood of Electrical 
Workers, Studio Branch: Weekly meeting, 
at 5402 Hollywood Boulevard. President, 
H. D. Martin; Secretary, A. P. Speede. 

Hollywood Association of Foreign Corre- 
spondents: Semi-monthly meeting, at Hotel 
Christie, 6724 Hollywood Boulevard. Presi- 
dent, Joseph B. Polonsky. 

18 — 233 Club: Semi-monthly meeting, at 6735 

Yucca Street, Hollywood.. President, John 
LeRoy Johnston; Secretary, Abraham S. 
Goldman. 

Brotherhood of Studio Carpenters, Local 946: 

Weekly meeting, at 6474 Santa Monica 
Boulevard, Hollywood. 



The Wampas: Weekly meeting, at 6700 Sunset 
Boulevard, Hollywood. President, Frank 
Whitbeck; Secretary, Carlisle Jones. 

The Breakfast Club: Weekly meeting, at 3213 
Riverside Drive, Los Angeles. President, 
Carl Laemmle; Manager, Harold B. Link. 

19 — United Scenic Artists: Monthly meeting, at 
2560 North Beachwood Drive, Hollywood. 
Executive in charge, William B. Cullen. 

23 — Motion Picture Make-Up Artists Association: 

Weekly meeting, at 1666 North Highland 
Avenue, Hollywood. President, Perc West- 
more; Secretary, Jack Lloyd. 

24 — Federated Motion Picture Studio Crafts: 

Weekly meeting, at 2560 North Beachwood 
Drive, Hollywood. President, Harry W. 
Scott; Secretary, Richard L'Estrange. 

Assistance League: Board of directors' weekly 
meeting, at 5604 DeLongpre Avenue, Holly- 
wood. Managing Director, Mrs. Lee Wray 
Turner. 

International Brotherhood of. Electrical 
Workers, Studio Branch: Weekly meeting, 
at 5402 Hollywood Boulevard. President, 
H. D. Martin; Secretary, A. P. Speede. 

25 — ^The Wampas: Weekly meeting, at 6700 Sunset 

Boulevard, Hollywood. President, Frank 
Whitbeck; Secretary, Carlisle Jones. 

The Breakfast Club: Weekly meeting, at 3213 
Riverside drive, Los Angeles. President, 
Carl Laemmle; Manager, Harold B. Link. 

Brotherhood of Studio Carpenters, Local 946: 

Weekly meeting, at 6474 Santa Monica 
Boulevard, Hollywood. Business Represen- 
tative, J. F. Kearns; Secretary, W. E. Sparks. 

27 — International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees, Coast Branch: Directors' semi- 
monthly meeting, at 6472 Santa Monica 
Boulevard, Hollywood. Business Represen- 
tative, Lew C. G. Blix. 

30 — Motion Picture Make-Up Artists Association: 

Weekly meeting, at 1666 North Highland 
Avenue, Hollywood. President, Perc West- 
more; Secretary, Jack Lloyd. 

31 — Federated Motion Picture Studio Crafts: 

Weekly meeting, at 2560 North Beachwood 
Drive, Hollywood. President, Harry W. 
Scott; Secretary, Richard L'Estrange. 

Assistance League: Weekly meeting, at 5604 
DeLongpre Avenue, Hollywood. Managing 
Director, Mrs. Lee Wray Turner. 

International Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers, Studio Branch: Weekly meeting, at 
5402 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood. 
President, H. D. Martin; Secretary, A. P. 
Speede. 

Hollywood Association of Foreign Corre- 
spondents: Semi-monthly meeting, at Hotel 
Christie, 6724 Hollywood Boulevard. Presi- 
dent, Joseph B. Polonsky. 



Film Forum Special Showings 
To Commence on January 22 

Starting January 22, the recently organ- 
ized Film Forum will exhibit special pictures 
for its members in the auditorium of the 
New School for Social Research in New 
York. Six appropriate pictures have been 
obtained thus far and the program commit- 
tee is negotiating for others. 



January 14, 1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



27 



' 'i 



ASIDES & INTERLUDES 

By JAMES CUNNINGHAM 



l!IIIPI>l||>l^l'li|;!|l: 



AT Le Mars, Iowa, lawyer Herbert S. 
Martin, about to foreclose a mortgage 
against Farmer Johnson, last week, was 
dragged down the court house steps by other 
farmers. He was bidding in the farm for less 
than the mortgage, leaving Johnson still m 
debt. To save his neck, Maxtin had to wire 
the New York Life Insurance Company for 
permission to raise the bid. A lawyer's life 
in the mortgaged farm belt is not gay. 

All of which reminded Mr. Hearst's favorite 
editorial writer, Arthur Brisbane, about the 
time when Merlin Hall Aylesworth was a 
young lawyer, working for nothing. One day 
Mr. Aylesworth was protecting a Western 
farmer with two mortgages on his farm and 
one on his sheep. When the bankers told the 
farmer he must get out, he burst mto tears. 
One kind-hearted banker patted him on the 
shoulder: "Don't cry, everything will come out 
all right." The farmer said: "I am not crying 
for myself, I am crying when I think of you 
bankers in the farming business." 

V 

Good-natured Kate Smith's robustness is, 
evidently, one of her chief resources. The 
other night, during her farewell-to-HoUy- 
wood broadcast, she started to liquidate 
when she broke down and cried at the 
microphone just as she was about to send 
that moon over the mountain. Several 
prominent film folk stopped in at the studio 
out there to wish Kate bon voyage back 
East. It was all very touching. Kate came 
back lighter but richer. 

V 

There's a sweet little thing working in one 
of the home offices who re-wrote the title of 
Jay Gorney's popular song, to read like this: 
"Brother, Can You Spare a Diamond'/" 
V 

The cough-drop "orchestra," of the four 
Mills Brothers — John, Herbert, Harry and 
Don — has earned $200,000 from vaudeville, 
recording and motion picture work in the 15 
months since the boys made their air debut. 

Groucho and Chico Marx kindly agreed to 
appear once weekly on a nationwide broad- 
cast — for $5,000, for 15 minutes. The four 
young chaps who write the dialogue for this 
brief program receive $2,000 each week for 
their efforts. Depression? 

V 

One of the "head men" dashed into a 
studio conference in Hollywood the other 
morn an hour late. "Where do you think 
I was last night?" he demanded of the im- 
patient gathering as he breezed through the 
door. "I know," chirped one of the wise 
boys, "night school!" 

V 

William Gargan has a very exact definition 
for a yes mam: an individual who has the 
courage of other people's convictions. 

y 

Radio programs are just a great big head- 
ache to Eddie Buzell. Nor are they a bromo 
to exhibitors who find many patrons staying at 
home for entertainment. Between gags and 
grapefruit juice at Sardi's, Eddie let it be 
known the other post-meridian, that he is 
worried about the future of comedy in pictures. 
"This promiscuous broadcasting of the Cantors 
and Pearls, to say nothing of how often they 
hit the Marxes, can't go on if we comedians 
want to continue meeting our picture-custom- 
ers on a cash-an-tarry basis," he said. "Pretty 
soon the radio-ragged audiences will be walk- 
ing out on us. We'll be left holding the gags — 
just the old jokes at home. They'd leave, too, 
if they weren't too d - - old to walk. No kid- 
ding," kidded Eddie, "a gag today is a hag 
tomorrow . . . and that means the next ten 
minutes on a coast-to-coast gasworks. Keep 
that up for another year or two and take the 
consequences. Producers will be crying, 'My 
filmdom for a gag'." f--,: ^ 



MR. ROCKEFELLER AND 
HIS RKO INVESTMENT 

One bright morning last week, the 
learned editor of Dow, Jones' Wall 
Street Journal received from a 
subscriber the folloiving inquiry: "I 
understand the Rockefellers have a 
good interest in Radio - Keith - Or- 
pheum. If it is good enmtgh for them, 
I should think it is good enough for a 
small investor. What do you think?" 

The qtiestion was published, and so 
was the answer, which said, in part: 
"Rockefeller interest in Radio-Keith- 
Orpheum springs from the 100,000- 
share holding taken in connection 
with modification of RKO leases in 
Rockefeller Center. This was hardly 
a matter of voluntary investment." 

The opening of Radio City's motion 
picture theatre received almost as 
much newspaper space as Music Hall, 
due to the untiring efforts of expert 
publicists. 



ONE hundred enterprising merchants of 
Greater New York have already adopted 
the name, "Roxy" for their business. While 
the receiver for the old Roxy theatre on 
Seventh Avenue was vigorously fighting RKO 
in court for right to use the name, scores of 
up-and-comin' businessmen of the Metropolis 
were rapidly tearing down old name signs and 
erecting new ones. 

The name "Roxy" now adorns barber shops 
and suspender factories ; button hole plants, 
delicatessens, garages, kosher dairies, plumbing 
shops, pool rooms and beauty salons ; doughnut 
shoppes, vegetable stands, shoe repairers and 
dollar cleaners. There's a Roxy Finance Com- 
pany, in the Bronx, and a Roxy "Grille," on 
West 46th Street. The telephone directory lists 
all of them. 
Such is fame. 

V 

Lowell Sherman, Paramount director, 
hired a "pickpocket" as a practical joke, to 
pilfer articles from the pockets of players 
working in Paramount's "She Done Him 
Wrong." Disguised as an extra, he success- 
fully created a small panic. Sherman had 
his little laugh, the valuables were returned 
and he paid o£f his conspirator. An hour 
later he discovered his own watch was gone. 
V _ 

Hollywood has only just heard the yarn 
about the motion picture actor who is SO 
popular that at least three companies are after 
him — gas, electric and telephone. 

V 

When the Radio City Music Hall opening 
approached there was a rush for seats and 
frantic pressure, among other places, on the 
offices of a New York official of RKO. And 
seats were rare indeed. None were free, each 
subsidiary or vested corporation and depart- 
ment being solemnly required to purchase them 
by requisition. 

The executive was not to be caught short 
twice. He placed a very hirge order indeed, 
for the RKO Roxy picture house opening, in 
behalf of his department. But, lo, there was 
no demand. Caught long, he called in em- 
ployees, one by one, and in the strictest confi- 
dence "fixed 'em up" for the big show. 

But the seats were enbloc — So there was a 
home office section at the big show. The con- 
fidences were seated sidQ^'by side all in a row. 



WHEN the annual winter meeting on the 
border track of Agua Caliente opened the 
other week, again sponsored by interests headed 
by Joseph M. Schenck, a new betting scheme 
was launched to lure Holly woodites and others 
down to the Mexican oval. It is called "Seven 
Straight," and was supposed to have been ex- 
plained by Mr. Schenck to Eddie Cochrane, 
sports writer, who describes it thusly: 

The player will endeavor to pick seven 
straight winners in a single afternoon. The 
Agua Caliente Jockey Club will pay $5,000 in 
cash to each successful picker. The player 
makes out a special ticket which he buys at the 
cost of an ordinary mutuel ticket. If no one 
sweeps the card on any one day the $5,000 
is added to the prize on the following day. 
Thus, in a few days, the pool may total 
$20,000 or $30,000, or more, continually mount- 
ing until someone picks seven straight. 

If, one week before the meeting closes, on 
March 19, a large pool remains, the money 
will be awarded in the following manner: If 
the pool totals, for instance, $210,000, it will 
be split seven ways, $30,000 for each race. 
Then, each $30,000 will be subdivided three 
ways— straight, place and show. 

V ^ 
Associated Theatre Owners of Indiana says 
that some of the distributors are giving dis- 
counts where payments for films are made 30 
to 60 days in advance. 

V 

Glass used in studio and theatre lamps is 
supposed to be uniformly free from dis- 
figurations. To obtain such g:lass, sand 
which is 99.7% pure must be utilized. Even 
sand which is good enough for high-grade 
plate glass is not good enough for these 
lamps. In the place where sandstone of the 
proper purity can be obtained, the rock is 
quarried and crushed, eliminating at the 
source the incidental impurities always 
present in native loose sand. This sand is 
shipped to the glass works of the manu- 
facturer in specially constructed white- 
painted tank cars, as carefully guarded 
against dust and other contamination as a 
shipment of milk. 

V 

We learned the other day where Martin Beck 
got his idea for turning unprofitable theatres 
into 3.2 per cent beer gardens. It seems that 
many years ago, Mr. Beck, an RKO circuit 
executive, met up with the owner of a saloon 
on North Clark Street, Chicago. After having 
been an actor on the German stage in the 
Deutsch neighborhoods of New York, ^ St. 
Louis, Chicago, Milwaukee and San Francisco, 
Mr. Beck conceived the idea of mixing beer 
and beauty. And so he built a platform in his 
friend's saloon on which he presented come- 
dians and soubrettes. With the aid of William 
Passpart, now European representative for 
RKO, Beck engaged artists, and, aided by the 
sale of beer and other drinks, made a lot of 
money. Evidently Mr. Beck remembers the 
good old days. 

V 

Gary Cooper probably doesn't know it, 
but he is Hortense Schoor's most constant 
observer. His pictured self looks down at 
her from 12 different angles on the wall be- 
side her desk in the Columbia home office. 
Gary is a Paramount star; Hortense is Col- 
umbia's press agent. Is this treason, or 
what is t'reason? 

V 

When Jimmy Durante heard that his direc- 
tor, Norman Taurog, had been assigned by 
Paramount to the next Maurice Chevalier pic- 
ture he wrote Norman as follows: "Sorry to 
hear that you are going to direct Chavalier. 
It's an awful come-down from Durante to 
Chevalier." ■ 




TnHGDOM" 




A. ^ * * 





to*®* 




o ^ 




FROM THE PLAY 
BY 

PHILIP BARRY 





THE WHOlI^UTH ..dbout 



"Half-Naked Truth a riot of Mirth . . . 
you will howl over the mad exploits 
. . . sparkling, merry and mad . . • fun 
from start to finish" 

— N. y. Hah Mirror 

• 

"Swift and hilarious, fast-moving, ex- 
pertly acted ... the entire cast Is a 
credit to the amusing lines and 
ingenious situations .... yesterday's 
audiences expressed their approval 
of it very definitely" 

— N. Y. World-Telegram 
• 

". . the press agent's stunts had the 
Mayfair audience roaring. The one 
that got me rocking in my seat was 
Bates' exploitation of his group of 
nudities . . .The Half-Naked Truth turns 
out to be a whole-hearted laugh" 

— N. Y. Daily News 

• 

"Mr. Lee Tracy rises to new, magnifi- 
cent heights . . . one of the most up- 
roarious motion pictures that ever • 
visited Broadway ... not a quiet minute 
in the whole show, not a minute of 
dullness. ... It is a fine movie. It com- 
pares favorably with The Front Page' 
— very favorably. It should 
be seen" — N. Y. Sun 



"Lee Tracy . . . sparkles, scin- 
tillates, rampages, rants, 
raves and wisecracks across the screen 
in a stampede of laughter . . . impos- 
sible to describe the gags, so fast and 
hilarious they are — but the show is 
great and Lee Tracy is the last word 

in superlatives" 

— N. Y. Evening Journal 

m 

"Salvos of good fun furnished by The 
Half-Naked Truth" — N. Y. Times 





LUPE VELEZ 
LEE TRACY 

EUGENE PALLETTE 
FRANK MORGAN 

DIRECTION AND DIALOGUE BY 

GREGORY LA CAVA 



Executive Producer 



ANOTHER MONEY PICTURE FROM RKO-RADIO 



30 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14, 1933 



SHOWMEN*^ REVIEWS 



,rl,''"F',l 
lllllllll, 



This department deals with new product 

from the point of view of the exhibitor lilll'llllli' 
who is to purvey it to his own public 



iiiiiiiihIIIIiii 



Grand Slam 

(Warner Bros.) 
Comedy 

A satirical burlesque on the greatest of in- 
door sports — Bridge, and all its trappings. And 
like another recent Warner Brothers' picture, 
"Hard to Handle," it spontaneously suggests its 
own inherent showmanship. Comedy is there 
from the time the show really gets under way; 
apparently no laugh provoking possibility has 
been overlooked. Even the usually staid Paul 
Lukas has been transformed into a comedian. 

The start, which is a little slow and foreign 
to the basic theme, portrays a waiter-musician 
in a New York Russian caie, Peter Stanislav- 
sky, whose ambition is to become the author of 
erudite tomes. Marrying Marcia, he is in- 
veigled into playing Bridge, a game which he 
always has considered childishly simple and 
silly. Systems mean nothing to him ; he bids 
"seven spades" regardless. 

Sent to a Park Avenue apartment as a 
waiter, he is induced by Lola, who has a sup- 
pressed yen for him, into becoming a "fourth." 
His opponent is the noted Van Dorn, author 
of a fool-proof system, who goes down to 
spectacular and laughable defeat before the 
"seven spades" onslaught. Overnight, he be- 
comes a sensation. Glaring headlines welcome 
the new pasteboard genius. They make Peter 
and his wife "America's Bridge Sweethearts." 
Phillip ghost-writes "The Stanislavsky Sys- 
tem," which readily shows how a husband and 
wife can be partners a,t bridge without a family 
brawl resulting. 

A nationwide tour, ballyhooed to the skies, 
follows. In the climax the Bridge Sweetheart's 
romance blows up and Phillip adds the crown- 
ing touch by exposing the whole thing as a 
fraud. 

Then the real fun begins. Determined to 
rehabilitate himself, Peter propositions Van 
Dorn, who after all is only an ex-Indian chief 
medicine-show man, to a championship tourna- 
ment, which is nothing but a gigantic bur- 
lesque on the famous Culbertson-Lenz epic. 
Broadcast by Roscoe Karns in the manner of 
a championship prize fight or a world's series 
ball game, the ballyhooed battle is on. Industry 
stops, airplanes pause in midair, speeding trains 
stop in their tracks, even the breaking waves 
stand still, and gangsters forget their rackets 
as Peter takes a terrific trouncing. 

With Phillip, Marcia listens in on the deba- 
cle as Peter's partners desert him. When things 
look blackest, she rushes to him and with the 
old "seven spades" system working again, they 
annihilate Van Dorn. 

Then for a climax is a bewhiskered black- 
out, so cleverly used that your audiences should 
leave the theatre shaking with laughter. 

The punch of satirical realism appears to be 
the picture's greatest value. In its short run- 
ning time it is full of entertainment and nat- 
ural showmanship. Everything from trick 
teaser gags, easily and inexpensively possible, 
through the use of ordinary playing cards, up 
to local championship Bridge tournaments pro- 
moted in your theatre, with the finals coming 
simultaneously with your playdates is strictly 
in order, burlesquing the Culbertson, Lenz or 
Work Bridge systems. 

"Grand Slam" should prove clever entertain- 



THE concept of this departmen-t 
is that the exhibitor is con- 
cerned not v/ith any critic's idea 
of "how good?" or "how poor?" 
but rather with the question of pre- 
cisely what the product is and what 
is to be done with it when and as 
it is played. The exhibitor, in gen- 
eral, is concerned with the special 
aspects of strength and of weakness 
In the product, its appeals and short- 
comings, that he may adequately 
deal with it when he becomes its 
sponsor to his public. These "review" 
pages aim to aid the exhibitor as 
the retailer of the merchandise con- 
cerned.— THE EDITOR. 



ment for the whole family. — McCarthy, Hol- 
lywood. 

Produced and distributed by Warner Bros. Based 
on the novel by B. Russell Herts. Screen play by 
David Boehm and Erwin Gelsey. Directed by Wil- 
liam Dieterle. Photography by Sid Hickox. Film 
editor, Jack Killifer. Dialogue director, Arthur Gre- 
ville ColHns. Art director, Jack Okey. Gowns by 
Orry-Kelly. Release date, undetermined. Running 
time, 65 minutes. 

CAST 

Peter Paul Lukas 

Marcia Loretta Young 

Phillip Frank McHugh 

Blondie Glenda Farrell 

Lola Helen Vinson 

Barney Walter Byron 

Radio announcer Roscoe Karns 

Van Dorn Ferdinand Gottschalk 

Detective Flynn DeWitt Jennings 

Alex Joe Cawthorne 

Dot Mary Doran 

Nick Paul Porcasi 

Gregory Lucien Prival 

Artie Tom Dugan 

Player George Cooper 

Player John Sheehan 

Paul Maurice Black 

Harry Lee Moran 

Muriel Ruthelma Stevens 

Sob Sister Emma Dunn 

Theodore Reginald Barlow 

Referee Harry C. Bradley 

Ivan Charles Levison 

Mary Esther Howard 



Hello Everybody 

(Paramount) 
Kate Smith 

For audience interesting purposes, "Hello 
Everybody" is all Kate Smith, and, considering 
the popularity which her radio broadcasting 
has won for her, it should be enough to insure 
its box office results. The story, which is really 
divided into two parts, has for its main objec- 
tive the creation of sympathy and admiration 
for the central character. 

The first part portrays Kate as a hardwork- 
ing farm girl, who is considered by her neigh- 
bors as the leader in their fight to prevent the 
power company from buying up the rights in 
their valley. Losing the first skirmish, after 
they have put up their life's savings, Kate 
pledges herself to see them through and as 
the result of a broadcast she has made on a 
"good-will" program, sponsored by the power 



company, she receives an invitation to sing for 
a big national chain. But not until the higher 
courts confirm the first decision does Kate em- 
bark for New York to become an instantaneous 
radio luminary. 

The second part, in New York, is gayly 
musical with Kate presenting songs in pleasing 
fashion and her life surrounded by all the 
color and glamor of a national favorite. In 
this part of the picture appears something that 
will permit unusual advertising. Those familiar 
with the Smithian proportions will be surprised 
to see her dancing. But she does, a snappy 
number, that brought a salvo of applause from 
the preview audience. 

Finally Kate is back home with a contract 
that enables her to cooperate with the power 
company and build a dam in a spot that will 
not affect the homes of her neighbors and her- 
self. 

While that story may not hold a terrific ap- 
peal to urban audiences, her screen work am- 
ply proves that she has a picture personality 
and strong atmospheric plugging of Miss Smith 
as a great radio star should be the angle to 
excite their interest. In the rural areas, a com- 
bination of her name with the theme of the 
story should have a powerful appeal. 

The show is good family entertainment, Kate 
being pictured as a self-sacrificing soul. There 
is also a neat little romance between her sister, 
Sally Blane, and Randolph Scott, and a topical 
line of "rural" comedy supplied by Charles 
Grapewin. 

That every possible radio and music tieup 
should be exercised in connection with this pic- 
ture should be understood. The advance cam- 
paign, particularly in the country districts, 
should be heavier than usual. Concentrate on 
the name Kate Smith and make the most of 
the song numbers. — McCarthy, Hollywood. 

Produced and distributed by Paramount. Directed 
by William Seiter. From a story by Fannie Hurst. 
Screen play by Dorothy Yost and Lawrence Hazard. 
Music and lyrics by Arthur Johnston and Sam Cos- 
low. Photographed by Gilbert Warrington. To be 
released in March. Running time, 70 minutes. 
CAST 

Kate Smith Kate Smith 

Hunt Blake Randolph Scott 

Lily Smith Sally Blane 

Jed Charles Grapewin 

Mr. Blair George Barbier 

Ettie Fern Emmett 

Thompson Frank Darien 

Mrs. Smith Julia Swayne Gordon 

Mr. Parker Wade Boteler 

Bobby Smith Jerry Tucker 

Betty Smith Marguerite Campbell 

Jonathan Reed Frank McGlynn 

Horton Erville Alderson 

Joe Jack Pennick 

Sinclair Eldridge Edward Davis 

Kate's Manager Ted Collins 

Mrs. Thompson Hallene Hill 

Lindle Paul Kruger 

Constable Long Poff 



The Intruder 



(Allied) 
Mystery Thriller 

There is so much thrill mystery and terror 
in "The Intruder" that handling it in the usual 
way may not create the desired reaction among 
patrons. As the show is exaggerated, so should 
the idea of your campaign be made novel. Try 
to get over the idea that it is more thrilling 
than any super-thriller of the past; that it has 
a different brand of terror than anyone ever 
conceived before ; that its mystery would puzzle 



January 14, 1933 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



31 



the greatest of detectives, either screen or real ; 
that its melodrama is of a different and more 
powerfully interesting sort, and cap the whole 
line with the news that instead of scaring them 
it will hand them more good laughter than 
many a comedy. You won't have to burlesque 
the picture to do this. 

The picture has been well worked out. The 
players occupy their respective roles in a man- 
ner that should be satisfactory to all. The 
running time is short and action and suspense 
have been packed into it. 

Proper handling will make the picture suit- 
able for both adult and juvenile consumption. 

Possessing plenty of entertainment value in 
its own right, it is also a picture that will per- 
mit exhibitors to indulge in much unusual in- 
terest-creating showmanship. In the first place 
it's a thrill mystery melodrama, and that fact, 
coming at a time when the public is pretty 
well sated with that type of entertainment, 
makes it necessary to surround it with a differ- 
ent atmosphere. 

Starting with a storm at sea, the yarn runs 
through a whole series of excitement-provok- 
ing episodes. There's a murder, followed by 
an inquisition in which a self acclaimed detec- 
tive usurps the Captain's authority, precedes a 
shipwreck; a landing on a desert island, where 
the little party is terrorized by all sorts of 
weird jungle noises; the discovery of a group 
of skeletons in a cave; the accusing of Brandt 
of the murder ; another murder, this time with 
the Captain and the two girls driven into the 
jungle by the killer ; a fanatical Wild Man ; the 
saving of the girls ajid the capture of the 
second murderer; rescue by a passing liner and 
the surprise climax. — McCarthy, Hollywood. 

Distributed by Allied Pictures. Directed by Albert 
Ray. Story and screen play by Frances Hyland. 
Photographed by Harry Neumann and Tom G'alli- 
gan. 

CAST 

Jack Brandt Monte Blue 

Connie Wayne Lila Lee 

Daisy Gwen Lee 

Reggie Wayne Arthur Housman 

Valet Sidney Bracy 

Wild Man Mischa Auer 

Cramer Harry Cording 

Samson William B. Davidson 

Mr. Wayne Wilfred Lucas 

Purser Lynton Brent 

Hanson Jack Beek 

Captain Allen Cavan 



Men and Jobs 



( Amkino ) 
Drama 

Coming from the producing company of 
Russia, Suyoskino, and released in this country 
by its agent, Amkino, "Men and Jobs," at- 
tempting a dramatic story, is at the same 
time undeniably propaganda for the Russian 
cause and more specifically for the Soviet five- 
year industrial plan. 

Russian dialogue is used throughout, with 
superimposed translations into English to aid 
the American audience. Indicated is the man- 
ner in which the Russians, in their attempt to 
solve the problem of the technical methods 
with which they are unfamiliar, have adopted 
the teachings of an American engineer, aiding 
as a consultant. 

In an effort to impart to the picture some- 
thing of a story form, there has been evolved 
the narrative of the Russian section foreman 
on the large construction job, who is taught 
by the American engineer the inefficiency of 
his methods and profits by the teaching to the 
extent of running an even race with the 
American in completing a portion of the job. 
The antagonism which the Russian had early 
felt for the American's blunt criticism, turns 
to friendship at the end. An incidental romance 
is again part of the attempt to overlay the 
propaganda. 

Except as a picture of the manner in which 
the Russians are attemtping to conquer that 
field of which they knew very little, the film 
has comparatively little marketing possibilities 
in this country. It might be run as a novelty, 
but there could be no promises of anything 
except exactly what is offered. The type and 
subject of the picture would seem to dictate 



its exhibition rather exclusively in those houses 
in the large metropolitan centers which make a 
practice of using foreign product. — Aaronson, 
New York. 

Produced by Soyuzkino, Distributed by Amkino. 
Directed by A. Macharet. Photographed by A. 
Galperin. Release date, January 1, 1933. Running 
time, 70 minutes. 

CAST 

Zakharov N. Okhlopkov 

Mr. Cline V. Stanitzyn 

Vasiushka S. Poliakov 



The Unwritten Law 

(Majestic) 
Drama 

There is moderate entertainment in this in- 
dependent production, with a bit of novelty 
imparted to the story in the form of mystery 
and a smattering of the inside of the motion 
picture studio at work. The names are reason- 
ably good, the performances satisfactory. 

Greta Nissen, foreign-accented blonde; 
Skeets Gallagher, as the noisy press agent at 
the sttidio ; Mary Brian, Louise Fazenda, Lew 
Cody, Purnell Pratt, Hedda Hopper, are all 
substantial names, with marquee possibilities 
best left to the judgment of the individual ex- 
hibitor according to what he knows his pat- 
ronage likes. 

Cody is the picture company boss who has 
cast Miss Nissen aside and plans to make Miss 
Brian a star. Pratt arrives as the high-priced 
novelist to write stories for her. Cody asks 
Miss Brian to marry him against the protest 
and warning of Theodore Von Eltz, the di- 
rector, in love with Miss Brian, and of Miss 
Brian's mother. Miss Hopper. Suddenly it is 
revealed that there is a tragic, strange past, 
involving Miss Hopper, Pratt, Cody; that Cody 
stole Pratt's wife, who is Miss Brian's mother. 
On location aboard ship, Pratt, through the 
recounting of a story he claims to have in 
mind, reveals that he plans to kill Cody, a 
plan real only to the people involved, and the 
audience. 

The exhibitor may capitalize on the mystery 
element, the behind-the-scene motion picture 
studio atmosphere, the mother-love thought, 
which leads the mother to commit murder and 
kill herself, rather than permit her daughter 
to marry the man who had ruined her life. 
There is a certain triteness in the revelation 
that Pratt is the father of Miss Brian, that 
Pratt finally finds Cody after a search of 19 
years, consequently it would perhaps be better 
to give little attention to this angle, concen- 
trating on the more novel aspects of the story. 
There is a certain amount of entertainment in 
the picture, but considerable work on the part 
of the exhibitor is required, since there is little 
outstanding "natural draw" in the film. It is 
obviously adult material. — Aaronson, New 
York. 

Produced and distributed by Majestic. Directed by 
Christy Cabanne. Story by John Krafft. Screen play 
by Edmund T. Lowe. Photographed by Ira Morgan. 
Recording engineer, Earl Crain. Film editor, Otis 
Garrett. Release date, November 15, 1932. Running 
time, 70 minutes. 

CAST 

Fifi LaRue Greta Nissen 

Pete Brown Skeets Gallagher 

Ruth Evans Mary Brian 

Lulu Potts Louise Fazenda 

Roger Morgan Lew Cody 

Jean Hedda Hopi)er 

Stephen McBain Pumell Pratt 

Val Lewis Theodore Von Eltz 

Abu Zeyd Mischa Auer 

Frank Woods Arthur Rankin 

Captain Kane Wilfred Lucas 

Ed Riley Ernie Adams 

The Steward Harold Foshay 

Script Girl Betty Tyree 

Deception 

(Columbia) 
Drama 

The punch and fast action of the wrestling 
arena serve to make this film at least in a 
measure entertaining. It is a story of the 
crookedness of the wrestling game, as it is 
promoted by accented Leo Carrillo, probably 
remembered for his gangster roles in the past. 
The manner in which a college football hero 



is framed into the game by offers of fat con- 
tracts, eventually discovers what has happened 
and finally wins the world's championship de- 
spite Carrillo, thereby smashing the crooked 
ring, forms the plot. 

The picture falls into the class of program 
fare, as to story, performance and execution. 
It is brought above the mediocre, however, by 
reason of the wrestling sequences, in which 
the players "do their stuff" with plenty of 
vigor, giving the bouts all the appearance of 
reality. One fight provides a measure of 
comedy with the amusing falls and tackles of 
the contestants. 

The exhibitor may sell the idea of an 
expose of the wrestling crookedness which has 
long been a factor in the sporting world. In- 
dicated are the methods employed by the pro- 
moter in "fixing" bouts to give the fans a 
good show. The cast offers Leo Carrillo, 
Thelma Todd, Barbara Weeks, Nat Pendleton, 
Henry Armetta for comedy and little Dickie 
Moore as marquee possibilities. The popular- 
ity of Carrillo a short while ago should still 
carry over sufficiently to make his name worth 
something in selling. 

Carrillo, finding his receipts dwindling, con- 
tracts Pendleton, builds him up by permitting 
him to win all bouts, without his knowing it. 
When the promoter finds his girl. Miss Todd, 
paying too much attention to the wrestler, 
Carrillo orders the champion to "give him the 
works." Ready to quit, Pendleton learns the 
truth, and Miss Weeks, his fiancee, urges him 
to attempt a comeback. Under the tutelage of 
an old wrestler, Pendleton learns the game, 
wrangles a return match from Carrillo as the 
"masked marvel," and wins the championship 
despite the effort of Caxrillo to stop him when 
he realizes Pendleton is wrestling to win. The 
bout is a fast action climax which has all the 
furious battle of the real thing. 

The women in the audience may not take 
too kindly to the brutality of the wrestling, 
consequently use of the romance angle and the 
comeback implication in the story may serve 
to bring them in. For the masculine portion 
of the patronage, indicate action, punch and 
.plenty of real wrestling to set them up in their 
seats. As a regular run picture, it has enter- 
tainment possibilities. — Aaronson, New York. 

Produced and distributed by Columbia. Directed 
by Lew Seiler. Story by Nat Pendleton. Screen play 
by Harold Tarshis. Assistant Director, Sam Katz- 
man. Supervisor, Ben Stolofl. Cameraman, Chet 
Lyons. Sound Engineer, Vernon Ashdown. Film 
editor, William Austin. Release date, November 4, 
1932. Running time, 67 minutes. 

CAST 

Jim Hurley Leo Carrillo 

Bucky O'Neill Nat Pendleton 

Lola Del Mont Thelma Todd 

Joan Allen Barbara Weeks 

Dickie Allen Dickie Moore 

Leo Frank Sheridan 

Nick Henry Armetta 

Ivan Stanislaus Hans Steinke 



Old New York 

(Educational) 
Good 

One of the "Do You Remember?" series, in 
which the library is tapped for pictures of New 
York in the nineties and thereabouts. It is of 
course amusing to see the big town in the day 
of mutton-leg feminine sleeves, top hats and tail 
coats, and feathered bonnets atop the "rat" of 
milady. The narrative, rendered by Lew Lehr, is 
meant to be amusing and succeeds quite well, al- 
though verging on the painful at odd moments. 
Subject has general appeal. Running time, 10 
minutes. 



Firehouse Honeymoon 

(RKO Radio) 

Amusing 

An amusing comedy situation is presented 
when Harry Sweet and his new bride can find 
no room at the hotel and are invited by a friend 
to spend their time at the firehouse. Harry 
sees very little of his wife as the firemen take 
possession of her, then both are dressed as fire- 
men to fool the suddenly arriving chief. They 
finally find a hotel room, but the firemen break 
in with hose and ax. — Running time, 18 minutes. 



.J 





ALL ABOARD FOR THE PARN- 
DEST SMASH OF THE YEAR! 



With ESTHER RALSTON, CONRAD VEIDT, Joan Barry, Harold HutK Gor- 
don Harker, Cedric Hardwicke, and many others. Directed by WALTER FORDE. 

A GAUMONT PICTURE 




34 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14, 1933 



ii' ii ill 



THEATRE RECEIPTS 



iii I 

iiiiiih 



•ill ■! 

liiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Theatre receipts from 125 houses In 20 major cities of the country for the 
calendar week ended January 7, 1933, aggregated $1,698,230, an increase of $228,- 
406 over the total for the preceding calendar week, ended December 31, 1932, when 
I 20 theatres in 20 cities reported a total gross of $ 1 ,469,824. One new high individual 
house record was established during the more recent seven-day period, one new low. 

(.Copyright, 1933: Reproduction of material from this department without credit to Motion Picture Herald expressly forbidden) 



Theatres 

Boston 

Fenway 1,800 

Keith's 3,500 

Keith- Boston .. 2,900 
Loew's Orpheum 2,200 
Loew'i State... 3,700 



Metropolitan 
Paramount . 



4,350 
1,800 



BufFalo 

Buffalo 3,500 

Century 3,000 

Court Street .. 1,800 

Erlanger 1,400 

Great Lakes .. 3,000 

Hippodrome ... 2,100 

Hollywood 300 

Lafayette 3.300 

Chicago 

Chicago 4.000 

McVickers .... 2,284 

Oriental 3.940 

Palace 2,509 

Roosevelt 1.591 

State Lake .... 2,776 

United Artists. 1.700 

Cleveland 

Allen 3,300 

MaU 753 

Ohio 1,500 

RKO Hippodrome 3,800 

RKO Palace .. 3,100 

State 3,400 

StjUman 1.900 

Warner's Lake. 800 

Denver 

Denham 1.700 

DenTer 2.500 

Hoffman's Rialto 900 



Orpheutn 
Paramount 



Detroit 

Downtown 



2.600 
2.000 



30c-50c 
30c- 50c 
25c-55c 
2Sc-S5c 
25c-5Sc 

35c-65c 
30c-50c 

30c-65c 
25c 
25c 
50c-$1.50 

25c-40c 
25c 

25c-40c 
25c 



35c-68c 
25c-SSc 
35c-68c 

35c-75c 
25c-55c 
2Sc-55c 
35c-68c 

15c-35c 

15c-2Sc 

S0c-$1.50 

15c-40c 

25c-40c 

25c- 50c 

25c-35c 
15c-50c 

15c-25c 
2Sc-S0c 
20c-40c 



25c-S0c 
2Sc-40c 



2,750 25C-50C 



Fisher 2,700 2Sc-65c 

Fox 5,100 2Sc-50c 

Michigan 4,000 2Sc-75c 

United Artists. 2,000 25c-75c 



Current Week 



Picture 



Gross 

14,000 



"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) and. 
"Handle With Care" (Fox) 
"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 21,000 



"Uptown New York" 

(World Wide) 
"Strange Interlude" (MGM) 

"Strange Interlude" (MGM) 



"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 

"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) and 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 



"No Man of Her Own" (Para.). 



20,500 
21,500 
25,000 

39,000 
16,500 

23,000 
7,000 



"Three on a Match" (F. N.) and 
"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) 

"Scarlet Dawn" (W.B.) 1,800 

(4 days) 

"The Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 8,500 

(2nd week) 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 11,000 

"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 6,900 

"Goona Goona" (First Div.) 2,600 

(2nd week) 

"Night Club Lady" (Col.) 6,000 

(4 days) 



"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) 54,000 

"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.).. 16,000 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 25,000 
(2nd week) 

"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 31,000 

"Fast Life'' (MQM) 12,000 

"Penguin Pool Murder" (Radio).. 11,000 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 13,000 

(2nd week) 

"Virtue" (Col.) 3,800 

"Kongo" (MGM) 13,500 

"The Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 8,000 

(2nd week) 

"Uptown New York" 7,600 

(Wbrld Wide) 

"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 13,500 

"Strange Interlude" (MGM) 21,500 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 6,100 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 3,000 

(5 days) 



"Strangers of the Evening" 4,500 

(World Wide) 
"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.) 



(Fox). 



"Virtue" (Col.) .... 

(3 days) 
"Sherlock Holmes" 
(4 days) 

"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 

(3 days) 
"Island of Lost Souls" (Para.). 

(4 days) 



9,000 

1,200 

1,800 

11,000 
3,000 

3,000 



"Animal Kingdom" 
(25c-40c) 



(Radio) 9,800 



"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.).. 11,200 
(25c-50c) 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 16,400 

"No Man of Her Own" (Para.).. 21,750 



"Cynara" (U. A.) 8,500 

(2nd week) 



Previous Week 



Picture 



Gross 



"Virtue" (Col.) and 14,000 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 

"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 21,500 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 22,000 
"Secrets of the French Police" (Radio) 
"Cynara" (U. A.) 21,000 



"Cynara" (U. A.) 



22,500 



"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 39,000 

"Virtue" (Col.) and 16,500 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 



"Rockabye" (Radio) 22,000 

"Prosperity" (MGM) 6,000 



"The Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 

(1st week) 
"You Said a Mouthful" (F. N.).. 



9,300 
9,700 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 5,900 



"Goona Goona" (First Div.) 2,900 

(1st week) 

"Those We Love" (World Wide) 4,500 

(4 days) 

"Her Mad Night" (Mayfair) 3,000 

(3 days) 



"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 26,000 

L. Rule).. 12,000 
(Para.).. 34,000 



"The Big Drive" (A, 

(2nd week) 
"A Farewell to Arms" 

(1st week) 



"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 27,000 

"Island of Lost Souls" (Para.).. 11,000 

"The Mummy" (U.) 11,500 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 18,000 

(1st week) 



"The Sport Parade" (Radio) and 4,500 
"Trailing the Killer" (World Wide) 

"He Learned About Women" 1,500 

(Para.) 

"The Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 15,000 
(1st week) 

"The Unwritten Law" (Majestic) 7,500 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 12,000 
"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 

"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 18,000 



'Call Her Savage" (Fox).. 
'Silver Dollar" (F. N.).... 



7,000 
6,500 



"Speed Demon" (Col.) 2.500 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 7,000 

(6 days) 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio)... 2,000 
(3 days) 

"Rackety Rax" (Fox) 1,500 

(4 days) 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 10,500 

"Payment Deferred" (MGM) 1,500 

(3 days) 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 3,500 

(4 days) 



"Sport Parade" (Radio) 10,500 

(2 days) 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 
"Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 
(5 days) 

"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) 12,600 

"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 25,500 

"Son-Daughter" (MGM) 22,400 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 9,200 

(1st week) 



High and Low Gross 

(Tabulation covers period from January, 1931 
to date) 



High 12-5 "Frankenstein" 27,000 

Low 3-25-32 "Explorers of the World". 16.000 

High 4-9-32 "Steady Company" 26,000 

Low 7-9-32 "By Whose Hand?" 16,500 

High 1-24 "Hell's Angels" 32.500 

Low 8-4-32 "Unashamed" 18,000 

High 6-18-32— 

"Hell Divers" "Possessed" andl 

"Sin of Madelon Claudet" / 26,000 

Low 7-18 "Man in Possession" 19,000 

High 1-31 "No Limit" 44,500 

Low 7-4 "I Take This Woman" 30,000 



High 3-28 "My Past" 39,500 

Low 12-23-32 "Under-Cover Man".... 14,300 

High 2-14 "Cimarron" 25,600 

Low 12-9-32 "Rain" 4,700 



High 8-8 "Politics" 35,100 

Low 11-25-32 "Night After Night" 7,808 

High 2-14 "Free Love" 26,300 

Low 7-16-32 "New Morals for Old" 4,200 



High 4-11 "Ten Cents a Dance"... 
Low 6-11-32 "The Secret Witness". 



24,100 
5,800 



High 1-23-32 "Two Kinds of Women". 67,000 

Low 12-22-32 "The Match King" 20,000 

High 2-7 "Doorway to Hell" 38,170 

Low 12-20-32 "The Big Drive" 15,000 

High 3-7 "My Past" 46,758 

Low 12-22-32 "Secrets of the French Police" 

13.000 

High 4-2-32 "Ckeaters at Play" 33.000 

Low 12-15-32 "False Faces" 14,000 

High 4-11 "Dishonored" 30,350 

Low 12-21-32 "They C:all It Sin" 10,000 

High 12-12 "Frankenstein" 44,000 

Low 6-25-32 "Is My Face Red" 7,000 

High 3-21 "City Lights" 46,562 

Low 11-18-32 "Magic Night" 8,200 



High 1-30-32 "Hell Divers" 26,000 

Low 1-7-33 "Virtue" 3,800 



High 5-2 "Laugh and Get Ricli" 40,000 

Low 12-30-32 "Little Orphan Annie" ) 

and "Half Naked Truth" J 12,000 

High 12-5 "Possessed" 30.000 

Low 6-20 "Vice Squad" 14,000 

High 10-3 "Fire Star Final" 15,000 

Low 7-4 "Big Business Girl" 2,000 



High 8-8 "Politics" 25,000 

Low 11-30-32 "If I Had a Million".... 8,000 



High MO "Hell's Angels" 22,000 

Low 6-25-32 "Forgotten Command- 1 

ments" and "Reserved for Ladies"/ 3,450 




If you made money on "Cock 
Eyed World" you can't fail with 
this ... 



Lupe, is, of course, Lupe blazing 
away as always . . . 




"Hot Pepper" fast comedy... 
McLaglen-Lowe team scores 
again ... 



Sure-fire comedy . . . hilarious re- 
ception afforded the entire picture 
by a San Diego preview audience... 



El Brendel adds more than his 
quota of laughs in his familiar 
dumb Swede bit . . . 



Credit John Blystone's direction 
for keeping things moving at top 
speed . . . 



A plentiful display of flesh, both 
on the part of Lupe and a fast 
chorus . . . 



Seems to have all the elements of 
which these rough and ready 
comedy hits are made . . . 



Edmund Lowe and Victor Mc- 
Laglen shine again as Quirt and 
Flagg... 




36 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14, 1933 



ETHEATCE CECEiPTS — CONT'D 1 



Theatres 



Current Week 



Picture 



Gross 



Hollywood 

Pantages 3,000 25c-40c 

W. B. Hollywood 3.000 25c-SSc 

Indianapolis 

Apollo 1.100 35c-SOc 

Circle 2,800 3Sc-50c 

Indiana 3,300 35c-6Sc 

Lyric 2.000 35c-50c 

Palace 2,800 3Sc-S0c 

Kansas City 

Liberty 1,000 lSc-25c 

Mainstreet 3,049 25c-40c 

Midland 4,000 2Sc-S0c 

Newman 2,000 2Sc-S0c 

Uptown 2,000 25c-40c 

Los Angeles 

Loew's State .. 2,416 25c-6Sc 

Paramount .... 3,S96 3Sc-70c 

RKO 2,700 2Sc-5Sc 

United Artists 2,000 25c-35c 

W. B. Downtown 2,400 2Sc-55c 

W. B. Western 2,400 25c-55c 

Minneapolis 

Century 1.640 2Sc-40c 

Lyric 1.238 2Sc-40c 

21KO Orpheum. 2,900 2Sc-SSc 

State 2,300 2Sc-SSc 

Montreal 

Capitol 2,547 2Sc-7Sc 

His Majesty's 1,600 30c-8Sc 

Imperial 1.914 lSc-50c 

Loew'i 3,115 25c-75c 

Palace 2,600 25c-7Sc 

Princess 2.272 2Sc-60c 

New York 

Astor 1,120 55c-$2.20 

Cameo 549 2Sc-75c 

Capitol 4,700 3Sc-$1.65 

Criterion 850 50c-$1.65 

Embassy 598 25c 

44th Street .... 1,482 25c-$1.10 

Hollywood 1,548 35c-99c 

Mayfair 2,300 35c-85c 

Palace 2,500 S5c-$1.65 

Paramount 3,700 40c-$1.10 

Rialto 1,949 40c-$1.10 

RiToU 2,103 40c-$1.10 

RKO Roxy .... 3,700 35c-$l-6S 

Roxy 6,200 35c-$l-10 

Strand 3,000 35c-$1.10 

Warner 1,490 25c-55c 



Winter Garden. 1,949 SSc-$1.10 



"Handle With Caie" (Fox) 13,000 

'Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 17,000 

"The Half-Naked Truth" (Radio) 4,000 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 6,000 

"No Man of Her Own" (Para.).. 13,000 

"Robbers' Roost" (Fox) 8,000 

"Strange Interlude" (MGM) 8,000 



"Age of Consent" (Radio) 2,500 

(2nd week) 

"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 6,000 

"Strange Interlude" (MGM) .... 50,000 

(7 days and Sat. midnite show) 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.) 14,000 

(8 days) 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 6,000 



"Son-Daughter" (MGM) 22,000 

"No Man of Her Own" (Para.).. 30,000 

"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 11,600 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 11,900 

(25c-55c) 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 16,750 



"The Match King" (F. N.). 



8,000 



"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 4,500 

"Air Mail" (U.) 2,500 

"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 14,000 

"A Fareweli to Arms" (Para.).. 8,000 



"The Conquerors" (Radio) and... 12,000 
"Most Dangerous Game" (Radio) 

"The End of the Road" 9,500 

(Hygiene) (6 days) 

"Enlevez-Moi" (French) and 4,000 

"Cain" (French) 

"Secrets of the French Police".. 14,000 
(Radio) 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 13,500 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 12,000 
and "Speed Demon" (Col.) 



"Rasputin and the Empress" 20,159 

(MGM1 (2nd week) 

"Men and Jobs" (Amkino) 3,800 

"Son-Daughter" (MGM) 56,625 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 12,500 

(4tli week-8 days) 

All Newsreel 6,962 

"Maedchen in Uniform" 6,500 

(Krimsky & Cochran) (16th week) 

"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) 7,500 

(2nd week) 

"The Half Naked-Truth" (Radio) 24,750 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 14,000 

(7th week-9 days) 

"No Man of Her Own" (Para.).. 65,700 

"Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 9,700 

(5th week) 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 36,800 

(2nd week) 

"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 71,267 

"No More Orchids" (Col.) 39,487 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 32,802 

(2nd week) 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 2,413 

(2nd week) 

"Laughter in Hell" (U.) 10,315 



Previous Week 

Picture Gross 

"Divorce in the Family" (MGM) 8,325 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 10,403 

"The Conquerors" (Radio) 3,000 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 6,000 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 11,000 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 7,000 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 4,000 



'Age of Consent" (Radio) 2,000 

(1st week) 

'Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 5,000 
"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 9,000 

(7 days and Sat. midnite show) 

"Madame Buttetrfly" (Para.).... 6,000 
(5 days and Sat. midnite show) 

"You Said a Mouthful" (F. N.).. 3,200 



"Strange Interlude" (MGM) 16,213 

"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 29,000 

"Half Naked Truth" (Radio) and 6,300 
"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) 

"Divorce in the Family" (MGM) 3,910 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 9.877 

"Central Park" (F. N.) 3,292 



"Handle With Care" (Fox) 4,500 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) 2,000 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 12,000 
"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 

"Tess of the Storm Country" 7,500 

(Fox) 



"You Said a Mouthful" (F. N.).. 11,000 
and "They Call It Fate" (F. N.) 



"Shanghai Express" (Para.) and 3,000 
"Le Clhien Jaune" (French) 

"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 13,000 

"Tess of the Storm Country" (Fox) 12,000 

"Frightened Lady" (British) and 7,500 
"Mischief" (British) 



"Rasputin and the Empress" 22,522 

(MGM) (1st week) 

"Devil's Playground" (Principal) 3,550 

(8 days) 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 49,196 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 15,500 

(3rd week) 

All Newsreel 6,773 

"Maedchen in Uniform" 7,000 

(Krimsky & Cochran) (15th week) 

"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) 12,060 

(1st week) 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 7,900 
"Penguin Pool Murder" (Radio) 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 14,000 

(6th week) 

"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 62,500 

"Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 13,500 

(4th week) 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 46,500 

(1st week) 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 42,198 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 39,396 

(1st week) 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 6,309 

(1st week) 

"Afraid to Talk" (U.) 7,234 

(2nd week) 



High and Low Gross 

(Tabulation covers period from January, 1931 
to date) 



High 4-30-32 "Careless Lady" 22,400 

Low 12-7-32 "Rain" 6,300 

High 2-7 "Little Caesar" 30,006 

Low 11-7 "Honor of the Family" 7,000 



High 6-13 "Daddy Long Legs" 10,000 

Low 8-20-32 "Jewel Robbery" 2,500 

High 2-14 "Cimarron" 13,000 

Low 7-30-32 "Westward Passage" 3,500 

High 1-17 "Her Man" 25,000 

Low 9-10-32 "Bring 'Em Back Aliye".. 5,000 



High S-2 "Trader Horn". 

Low 12-30-32 "Fast Life" 



22,000 
4,000- 



High 1-9-32 "Peach o' Reno" 2,5,500 

Low 12-29-32 "Little Orphan Annie" I 

and "The Half Naked Truth") 5,000 

High 1-23-32 "Hell Dirers" 30,400 

Low 12-8-32 "Man Against Woman"... 6,000 

High 2-27-32 "Shanghai Express" 25,000 

Low 12-8-32 "Evenings for Sale" 5,000 

High 1-10 "Girl of the Golden West" 8,000 

Low 5-21-32 "Lena Rivers" 2.000 



High 10-25 "Susan Lenox" 39,000 

Low 3-5-32 "The Silent Witness" 6,963 

High 10-31 "Beloved Bachelor" 41,000 

Low 2-6-32 "Tomorrow and Tomorrow" 7,500 



High 9-26 "Monkey Business" 32.000 

Low 2-6-32 "Sky Devils" 3,000 

High 2-7 "Little Caesar" 27,000 

Low 4-23-32 "Destry Rides Again" 6,200 



High 5-30 "Kild" 4,000 

Low 1-24 "Men on Call" 1,200 

High 12-14 "Cimarron" 30,000 

Low 12-24-32 "The Sport Parade" 11,000 

High 1-2-32 "Sooky" 10,000 

Low 12-24-32 "Rain" 6,000 



High 1-10 "Just Imagine" 18,000 

Low 12-23 '"Ths fli,orA<,m^^'> 1 



The Guardsman" and 1 
"The Tip-Oil"/ 



8,000 

High 1-17 "Office Wife" 10,008 

Low 12-23-32 "Cendrillon de Paris" ) 

and "Lc Fils de 1' Autre" ) 1,800 
High 4-2-32 "Fireman, Sare My Child" 16,500 

Low 7-18 "Stepping Out" 9,000 

High 4-2-32 "One Hour With You"... 19,500 

Low 12-23-32 "Life Begins" 8,500 

22,500 



High 4-1 "City Lights' 

Low 12-23-32 "The Crusader" and \ 
and "Hearts of Humanity" ) 



High 1-2-32 "Hell Divers" 
Low 11-14 "The Champ". 



6,000 



24,216 
18,759 



High 1-9-32 "Mata Hari" , 

Low 7-2-32 "New Morals for Old". 
High 1-3 "Reaching for the Moon" 

Low 5-24-30 "Silent Enemy" 

High 1-3 Newsreels 

Low 11-3-32 Newsreels 



.110,466 
. 29.767 

. 22,675 
. 10,800 
. 9,727 
. 5,200 





High 12-12 
Low 4-30-32 
lywood . 


"Cohens and Kellys in Hol- 


53,800 
7,600 







High 2-7 "Finn and Hattie" 85,900 

Low 12-23-32 "The Devil Is Driving".. 35,200 

High 2-27-32 "Shanghai Express" 64.600 

Low 6-27 "Dracula" and ) 

^. ^ "Hell's AngeU" f 4,500 

High 1-9-32 "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" 67,100 

Low 7-29-32 "Igloo" 8 000 



High 
Low 
High 
Low 

High 
Low 



High 
Low 



1-1-32 "Delicious" 

12-22-32 "Man Against Woman". 

1-17 "Little Caesar" 

4-2-32 "The Missing Rembrandt' 

1-3 "Viennese Nights" 

8-22 "Disraeli," "General Crack," 
"Noah's Ark," "Weary River " 
"Son of the God," "On With 
the Show," "Gold Diggers of 
Broadway" 

9-19 "Fire Star Final" 

8-2(^.32 "Hollywood Speaks".... 



.133,000 
23,000 
74,831 
8,013 

16,968 



1,646 



59,782 
5,690 



HENOMENALf 

m increase above normal business" ^ 



N. A. Mechanic 
NEW THEATRE 
BALTIIVIORE, M D 




,V,u' 



s9® 



opened 
to Record- 
Breaking 
Crowds at 

RADIO CITY 
MUSIC HALL 



TELEGRAM ! 



COLUMBIA PICTURES CORP 

729 SEVENTH AVE NEW YORK NY 

BITTER TEA OPENED YESTERDAY TO 
TREMENDOUS BUSINESS IN SPITE OF 
HEAVY OPPOSITION STOP SRO CHAIN 
WENT UP AT ONE OCLOCK AND REMAINED 
UNTIL TEN LAST NIGHT STOP BIGGEST 
OPENING ANY PICTURE TO DATE STOP 
YOU HAVE MADE A GREAT PRODUCTION A 
PICTURE EVERY EXHIBITOR AND THE 
INDUSTRY AS A WHOLE SHOULD BE PROUD 
OF STOP YOU ARE TO BE CONGRATULATED 

W.T. MURRAY 
RIALTO THEATRE ATLANTA GA 




^ Q NILS ASTHER -WALTER CONNOLL) 



A 



O a V i n O o r d o n * To s K i a Mori 

From tke Novel iy C race Zaring Stone 

A FRANK CAPRA PRODUCTION 
✓7 




PICTURE 



38 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14, 1933 



CTHEATCE KECCIPTS — CONT'D 1 



Theatres 

Oklahoma City 

Capitol 1,200 

Criterion 1,700 

Liberty 1,500 

Mid-West l.SOO 

Omaha 

Orpheum 3,000 



10c-40c 
lOc-SSc 
10c-35c 

lOc-SSc 
25c-55c 



Current Week 



Picture 



Gross 



Paramount 2.900 25c-50c 

Sute 1.200 25c 

Worid 2,500 25c-40c 

Philadelphia 

Aldine 1,300 50c-$1.50 

Arcadia 600 30c-S5c 

Boyd 2,400 3Sc-75c 

Earle 2,000 40c-65o 

Fox 3,000 3Sc-75c 

Karlton 1,000 30c-55c 

Keith's 2,000 15c-3Sc 

Stanley 3,700 35c-75c 

Stanton 1,700 30c-55c 

Portland, Ore. 

Fox Broadway.. 1,912 2Sc-65c 

Fox Liberty .... 1,800 lSc-2Sc 

Oriental 2,040 25c-35c 

RKO Orpheum 1,700 2Sc-S5c 

United Artists . 945 2Sc-35c 

San Francisco 

Filmarte 1,400 25c-50c 

Geary 1,551 25c-85c 

Golden Gate ... 2,800 25c-65c 

Paramount .... 2,670 2Sc-7Sc 

United Artists. .1,200 25e-55c 

Watfield 2,700 3Sc-90c 

Warner Bros. .. 1,380 35c-7Sc 

Seattle 

Fifth Avenue .. 2,750 25c-S5c 

Liberty 2,000 10c-25c 

Music Box 950 25c-50c 

Paramount 3,050 25c-55c 

Washington 

Columbia 1,232 25c-40c 

Earle 2,323 25c-66c 

Fox 3,434 2Sc-66c 

Loew's Palace.. 2,363 35c-55c 

Metropolitan .. 1,600 25c-55c 

Rialto 1,900 2Sc-55c 

RKO Keith's... 1,832 25c-55c 



"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) 3,300 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 8,600 
(10c-75c) 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 1,400 

(4 days) 

"Afraid to Talk" (U.) 950 

(3 days) 

"Tess of the Storm Country"...; 3,500 
(Fox) 

"Rockabye" (Radio) 5,500 

(4 days) (25c-40c) 

"Hell's Highway" (Radio) 6,000 

(3 days) 

"No Man of Her Own" (Para.).. 6,500 

"Robbers' Roost" (Fox) 800 

(5 days) 

"Call Her Savage" (Fox) and... 6,000 

"Three on a Match" (F. N.) 



"The Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 9,500 

(2nd week -6 days) 

"False Faces" (World Wide).... 1,300 

(3 days) 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).... 15,000 
(6 days) 

"Breach of Promise" 29,000 

(World Wide) (6 days) 

"Daring Daughters" (Monogram) 22,000 

(6 days) 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 7,000 

(7 days) 

"Self Defense" (Monogram) 11,500 

(6 days) 

"The Wife He Bought" (MGM) 14,000 
(6 days) 

"Lawyer Man" (W. B.) 7,500 

(5 days) 

"No Man of Her Own" (Para.).. 11,000 

"Evenings for Sale" (Para.) 1,000 

"Three on a Match" (F. N.).... 2,500 

"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 9,000 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 4,000 
(2nd week) 

"Queen of San Souci" (Foreign).. 1,350 

"Maedchen in Uniform" 8,300 

(Krimsky & Cochran) (2nd week) 

"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 21,000 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 20,000 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 16,000 

(2nd week) 

"The Devil Is Driving" (Para.).. 19,000 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 6,000 

"Me And My Gal" (Fox) and.... 7,500 
"Fast Life" (MGM) 

"Self-Defense" (Monogram) 3,750 

"Trouble in Paradise" (Para.).... 3,500 
(2nd week) 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.)... 9,500 



"Heritage of the Desert" (Para.) 3,250 

"Frisco Jenny" (F. N.) 20,000 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 26,500 

"Strange Interlude" (MGM) 17,250 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 4,500 

(2nd week) 

"The Mummy" (U. ) 5,000 

(2nd week) 

"The Half-Naked Truth" (Radio) 1,500 

(2 days) 

"Animal Kingdom" (Radio) 12,000 

(5 days) 



Previous Week 



Picture 



Gross 



"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 3,500 

"Cynara" (U. A.) 5,200 

"Thirteenth Guest" (Monogram) 1,400 
(4 days) 

"That's My Boy" (Col.) 1,100 

(3 days) 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 6,000 



Little Orphan Annie" (Radio) and 6,500 

" -- { -- — - ■■ - - 



"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 

(5 days) (2Sc-40) 
"Penguin Pool Murder" (Radio).. 

(3 days) 

"A Successful Calamity" (W. B.) 
(3 days) 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 
(7 days) 

"Under-Cover Man" (Para.) .... 

(4 days) 

"Follow the Leader" (Para.) 1,200 

(5 days) 

"Cabin in the Cotton" (F. N.) and 
"Me and My Gal" (Fox) 



8,250 
2,200 
7,750 
800 



6,250 



"The Sign of the Cross" (Para.) 11,000 

(1st week-6 days) 

"Prosperity" (MGM) 4,000 

(8 days) 

"The Match King" (F. N.) 9,000 

(5 days) 

"Central Park" (F. N.) 15,000 

(6 days) 

"Handle With Care" (Fox) 23,000 

(6 days) 

"He Learned About Women".... 4,500 
(Para.) (7 days) 



"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 13,000 

(6 days) 

"Mask of Fu Manchu" (MGM).. 9,000 

(6 days) 



"Flesh" (MGM) 12,500 

"Fast Life" (MGM) 1,000 

"Little Orphan Annie" (Radio).. 2,000 

(4 days) 

"Trouble in Paradise" (Para.).... 1,500 
(3 days) 

"Rockabye" (Radio) 10,000 

"A Farewell to Arms" (Para.).. 4,500 
(1st week) 



"A Nous La Liberie" (Foreign).. 800 

"Maedchen in Uniform" 9,500 

(Krimsky & Cochran) (1st week) 

"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 17,000 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 16,000 

"The Kid From Spain" (U. A.).. 20,000 

(1st week) 
"Handle With Care" (Fox) ... 



"He Learned About Women". 
(Para.) 



14,000 
3,500 



"Wild Horse Mesa" (Para.) and 6,500 
"Handle With Care" (Fox) 

"Texas Bad Man" (U.) 5,000 



"Trouble in Paradise" (Para.)... 



4,500 



'Flesh" (MGM) 8,500 



"Rackety Rax" (Fox) 2,875 



''Lawyer Man" (W. B.). 
'Cynara" (U. A.) 



18,000 

28,500 

"Madame Butterfly" (Para.) 11,200 

"Silver Dollar" (F. N.) 9,250 

(1st week) 

"The Mummy" (U.) 10,000 

(1st week-S days) 

"The Sport Parade" (Radio).... .?,200 

(3 days) 

"The Half Naked Truth" (Radio) 5,000 
(5 days) 



High and Low Gross 

(Tabulation covers period from January, 1931 
to date) 



High 2-7 "Illicit" 11,000 

Low 12-24-32 "The Devil Is Driving".. 3,009 

High 2-21 "Cimarron" 15,500 

Low 8-1-32 "Downstairs" 3,000 

High 1-24 "Under Suspicion" 7,200 

Low 6-20 "Big Fight" and j 

"Drums of Jeopardy" 900 

High 9-19 "Young As You Feel" 11,000 

Low 12-24-32 "They Call It Sin" 3,000 



High 2-14 "Cimarron" 25,550 

Low 6-18-32 "Night World" 8,500 



High 4-23-32 "Tarzan, the Ape Man". 13,750 
Low S-21-32 "Wet Parade" and "If s f 

Tough to Be Famous J 4,000 

High 3-14 "Trader Horn" 10.000 

Low 11-18-32 "Faithless and } 

"The Painted Lady" J 1.100 

High 4-11 "Men Call It Lore" 16,000 

Low 11-28 "The Cisco Kid" 4,500 



High 12-17 "The Guardsman"... 
Low 10-1-32 "Make Me a Star". 



6,500 
1.500 



High 1-5-33 "Breach of Promise".... 

Low 7-23-32 "Miss Pinkerton" 

High 2-7 "Man Who Came Back".... 

Low 6-18-32 "Mystery Ranch" 

High 5-2 "City Lights" 

Low 11-24-32 "Cabin in the Cotton" I 
and "Age of Consent" J 

High 1-30-32 "Arrowsmith" 

Low 5-28-32 "Steady Company" 

High 12-19 "Frankenstein" 

Low 7-25 "Rebound" 

High 3-21 "Last Parade" 

Low 11-17-32 "All American" 



High 1-10 "Min and Bill". 
Low 10-1-32 "The Crash". 



29,000 
12.500 
40.000 
15,000 

8.000 

3.N0 

27.000 
6,500 
31.000 

8.000 
16,500 

6.000 



21.000 
2.800 



High 2-14 "Cimarron" 20,000 

Low 11-23-32 "The Old Dark House".. 4,700 

High 1-10 "Hell's Angels" 12,500 

Low 11-2-32 "Payment Deferred".... 1.900 



High 8-4-25 "Bring 'Em Back Aliye".. 24,000 

Low 6-11-32 "Lena Rivers" 7.000 

High 1-9-32 "The Champ" 35,600 

Low 8-12-32 "Devil and the Deep" 9,500 

High 3-14 "Parlor, Bedroom and Bath" 28,000 

Low 12-29-32 "Handle With Care" 14,000 

High 3-26-32 "Fireman, Save My Child" 19,000 
Low 12-29-32 "He Learned About Women" 3,500 



High 7-30-32 "Milion Dollar Legs" 18.500 

Low 12-30-32 "Wild Horse Mesa" and) 

"Handle With Care" J 6,500 

High 1-10 "The Lash" 11.500 

Low 11-11-32 "Amazon Head Hunters" 3,000 

High 2-28 "City Lights" 14,000 

Low 11-25-32 "The Crooked Circle".. 3.000 

High 1-10 "Paid" 18,000 

Low 4-9-32 "No One Man" and.. \ 

"Devil's Lottery" f 7,000 



HOWtS WHEItE 



In your theatre — not 
on the back fence! 




""'"■^ly HIT. ^ ^^S^ ONE « ^ ^°^^«Hr 



L_4 l£ 

"TORCHY'S KITTY COUP- 
would make an excellent 
showing as a laugh get- 
ter on any program. At 
the Fairfax theatre pre- 
view, the audience just 
■ HOWLED at the antics 
of Torchy, and 
Franklyn Pangborn. " 

HOLLYWOOD FILMOGRAPH 




TORCHY'I 
KITTY COUP 




with RAY COOKE 

MARION SHOCKLEY • FRANKLYN PANGBORN 

a TORCHY COMEDY 

Produced and Directed by C. C. BURR 





THERE ARE HOWLS OF LAUGHTER 
IN EVERY ONE OF THESE NEW 1933 COMEDIES 





EDUCATIONAL FILM EXCHANGES, Inc, 

E. W HAMMOMS. President 



A VANITY COMEDY 
with a hundred 
beautiful co-eds 

And more of them coming 
every week from 



"THE SPICE OFTHE PROGRAM" 



40 



MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



January 14, 1933 



JCNriNS* CCLTUM m TBAVELERS... 



Waco, Texas 

DEAR HERALD: 

There may be better towns in Texas than 
Waco, but for the size of it we doubt it. 
Waco has seven theatres, and like other 
towns it has too many, but that's Waco's 
business. Our judgment would be that four 
would be aplenty. We met two very delight- 
ful people here in Waco, Mr. T. D. White- 
horn, who is the special investigator for 
the Griffith circuit in Oklahoma, and the 
Paschall circuit here in Texas, and Mr. 
J. P. Harrison, manager for the Paschall 
theatres in Waco. 

If there was anything in connection with 
the motion picture business that we failed 
to discuss it was because the matter was 
overlooked. We don't know whether they 
thought we knew anything about it or not, 
but they asked us some leading questions, 
one being our judgment as to the greatest 
menace to the business today and, we an- 
swered it in one word, "Radio." We expected 
this to start an argument, but it didn't, they 
both agreed with us. 

Then we said that the next greatest 
menace would be the return of beer, and 
they agreed with that also, which proves 
that three great minds run in the same 
channel, but which will cause a host of 
people to say, "Those guys are crazy." 

In a recent issue of the Herald, Uncle 
Carl Laemmle made a statement with refer- 
ence to the return of the saloon that this 
industry would do well to take cognizance 
of. The argument that the return of beer 
will bring prosperity to the country is an 
argument that we can't savvy. 

We'll know full z&ell good times are here 

When Pa comes home chock full of beer 
And has a glorious time. 

He'll neglect to bring the kids some shoes 

But he'll come home lit up with booze 
And that will just be fine. 

V 

We found W. H. Cluck of the Beltonian 
theatre at Belton just recovering from a 
severe attack of "flu." He looked it, in fact 
his proper place was in bed, although he 
was keeping pretty close to the house and 
not very far from the bed. He has the only 
theatre in a town of about five thousand 
and he ought to be doing a nice business. 
We judge he is, for he impressed us as a 
swell theatre manager. 

V 

C. J. Stevens has a unique theatre front 
in his Little theatre at Temple. It is built 
up with rustic rocks and impresses one 
as the entrance to a cave rather than a 
theatre. It is very pretty and the novelty 
is quite striking. He has promised to send 
Chick Lewis a picture of it for his "Round 
Table" department. Mr. Stevens has also 
built two very nice bungalows, out of the 
same material, which are the show places 
of Temple and make one feel that he wants 
to move right down there and occupy one 
of them. He's been out of the Herald fam- 
ily altogether too long, but he is in now. 

V